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Old 01-04-2012, 08:53 PM   #511
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I think I can top that although I've never had this so not sure. Just read the description for Poutine (Canadian dish).

I'm pretty sure I don't want to see Mushy Peas or Poutine on my plate.
Oooooohhhhh! I haven't had poutine in AGES. Now I want some. Gourmet Greg, you can just pass your plate to me and I'll look after the poutine for you.

For me, cottage cheese can remain on store shelves. Blech. There aren't many other things I won't at least try. Cottage cheese remains on my "do not eat" list though.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:00 PM   #512
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Oh, you had the original, real stuff, before it got popular in Montreal. It was eaten in small places all over Quebec way before it hit Montreal. Do you remember where you had it? I had my first poutine in or near Rivière du Loup. I was hooked too.
That's where we stopped! They had about 12 different (if not more) options for toppings. It was SOOOO good. Homemade gravy, handcut fries, and fresh curds...still remember it as one of the very best poutines ever. Locally, the chip wagon puts ground beef on the poutine and calls it Morrisburg poutine.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:03 PM   #513
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This is my first post on this very long thread, as there really is little within reason that I can't tolerate on my plate, including fried Mountain Oysters.
It depends on how much beer you've consumed <g>. In MN, we'd have fried smelts when the smelt were running at keggers.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:34 PM   #514
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i've never had mushy peas, but it probably won't surprise anyone who knows me here, that i would love to try them. and i'll almost certainly like them once i do. i make my pea soup with whole dried peas, which can be difficult to find at times. one time when i was out of regular dried peas, i used marrofat peas for my soup. this resulted in a soup with a deeper and more satisfying flavor than my usual. but those marrofat peas were soo expensive....
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:10 PM   #515
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Originally Posted by Alix View Post
Oooooohhhhh! I haven't had poutine in AGES. Now I want some. Gourmet Greg, you can just pass your plate to me and I'll look after the poutine for you.

For me, cottage cheese can remain on store shelves. Blech. There aren't many other things I won't at least try. Cottage cheese remains on my "do not eat" list though.
I'm pleased that my comments struck a responsive chord. I'd love to think that I have a friend in Edmonton who would feed me. There's no better friends in the world above friends who would feed you.

The poutine recipe struck me as too fatty, too starchy. I consider both to be dietary sins, not upon nature but merely that I fancy my waste line and I struggle to maintain thinness and fitness even through my senior years. I think poutine would make me fat if I consumed it regularly. That's why I put it on my "do not" list. Maybe I'm wrong. (I have a lot of experience in that.)
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:20 PM   #516
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Isn't it marvelous how many different cultures are represented here on DC with likes and dislikes spread across the spectrum?

We should all remember that no matter how much we may dislike something, to someone else, it's nectar of the Gods or manna from Heaven.

That's one of the reasons I love to watch Andrew Zimmern's Bizarre Foods show. He shows the foods that are loved by people in far off lands who will never know how revolting their foods are to some of us in our own lands.

The endless variety of life sometimes fascinates me.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:27 PM   #517
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Gourmet Greg, you are welcome at my table anytime! We eat fairly healthy most of the time, but I will admit to indulging in complete and total crap from time to time. Poutine fits squarely in the indulgence category.

Make sure you visit in the summer so I can make sure to showcase all the healthiest recipes in my repertoire!
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:53 PM   #518
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Alix and Timothy, I'd love to dine with either of you. I'm somewhat unused to discussing cooking with real, enthusiastic chefs. That's one of the best things that I got out of this forum, being able to discuss cooking with fellow enthusiasts. At present I have only one friend who is an ardent chef, and all the rest of the people I know are either foodies, non-foodies, and none of them but one are chefs at all. I sometimes think that I'm the only chef/cook out there, just thankful that many of my friends are foodies even though they are not interested in cooking.

People who enjoy cooking are rare in life if my experience is any indication. Barring professional chefs most people divide into either foodies or gourmands, and few if any of them have any interest at the stove. Me and thee excepted of course!
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:28 PM   #519
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Alix and Timothy, I'd love to dine with either of you. I'm somewhat unused to discussing cooking with real, enthusiastic chefs. That's one of the best things that I got out of this forum, being able to discuss cooking with fellow enthusiasts. At present I have only one friend who is an ardent chef, and all the rest of the people I know are either foodies, non-foodies, and none of them but one are chefs at all. I sometimes think that I'm the only chef/cook out there, just thankful that many of my friends are foodies even though they are not interested in cooking.

People who enjoy cooking are rare in life if my experience is any indication. Barring professional chefs most people divide into either foodies or gourmands, and few if any of them have any interest at the stove. Me and thee excepted of course!
I first entered the world of cooking at the tender age of 4 years. At the time, I stayed with my mother on week-days, and with my father on week-ends. They were divorced and lived on opposite sides of the town (small town). I was at Mom's house and she was baking stuffed acorn squash in the oven. This was back in 1959. I made my way to the stove/range and twisted the oven dial a bit. I increased the oven temperature, innocently of course. The squash was burned and I got the strap, literally. I still remember how much it stung on my little bare bottom. I never touched the stove again, without close adult supervision until I was about 12. By then, I knew how to make pancakes, fried eggs, and could could heat up a can of beans with hot dogs as well as anyone, not to mention "Chef Boy-Ar-Dee" (sp) pizza kits. But it was the breaded, fried sardines that caught my parents attention. And I've been experimenting ever since.

Now I'm sure that many of my early experiments would be things not wanted on any plate. But my rule was, and is - if I make it, I gotta eat it.

How many of you can remember cooking that first, perfect grilled cheese sandwich, or your first perfect beef roast on the charcoal grill, with everything from well done, to rare on the same roast, something for everyone.

I can cook so many more kinds of food than could my parents. But I can't make goulash, Great Lakes style, or pan fried, fresh, Lake Superior Brook Trout as good as my Dad could(of course that may have something to do with the quality of the fish). Nor can I top my Mother's chili, or baked foods (though I can make baked goods as good, and better pasties).

What my parents and grandparents made, they made very, very good. I've just branched out more into the world's cuisines than they did.

Do I love cooking? My wife gave up on cooking early in our marriage as I was always pestering her to try this, and change that, and add a bit of this, to her already good recipes. She threw up her hands one day and said, "That's it. I quit. The kitchen is yours." I've been the chef in my house ever since (chef means chief of the kitchen, and in my house, that's me.).

Here's a challenge for you. My oldest sister and I used to see who could make, and eat the most ridiculous sandwich. One would make it, and the other had to eat it. The challenge is to take a bit of anything available from the fridge and make a sandwich out of it. Then the person you are playing with must eat it, and return the favor. Mooohuahahahaha.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:39 PM   #520
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Okra unless they are pickled and anything cooked with an anise flavor. I don't even like the word liquorice! I love all veggies unless they are cooked to mush.
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