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Old 01-06-2012, 09:55 AM   #531
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I have to agree with you Tim. I got used to the idea when I lived in Hawaii. It wasn't for my palate, but then neither are ants or grasshoppers.
Dog is eaten in Hawaii? I hadn't heard that before.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:00 AM   #532
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Dog is eaten in Hawaii? I hadn't heard that before.
Lots of mysterious dog disappearances occurred here years ago after an influx of immigrants...took them a while to learn that Americans don't eat their dogs. Their first Generation born are now pet owners instead of food handlers.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:03 AM   #533
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Dog is eaten in Hawaii? I hadn't heard that before.
It was said to be common among the Filipinos. That's why you kept your dogs on a leash at all times.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:08 AM   #534
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Lots of mysterious dog disappearances occurred here years ago after an influx of immigrants...took them a while to learn that Americans don't eat their dogs. Their first Generation born are now pet owners instead of food handlers.
The same thing happened at the last Army Posting I had. The dogs on the base started disappearing and the Post Commander had to put out a notice about the issue. I had lots of Korean friends on base and I was told once that I had shared a meal with a family that was dog in a type of stew. I have no idea which meal or family it was, but I must have enjoyed it. The women in the Korean families I shared meals with were all great cooks. It's where I got addicted to kimchi. The wife of my best friend at the time "Sookie", made awesome kimchi. Spicy enough to remove paint, but incredibly tasty! I think it might have been their home where I must have eaten the dog.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:15 AM   #535
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Food taboos are pretty interesting. Some religious taboos aren't much of a burden. Jews and Muslims can't eat bats. Today, at least, few in Europe and near east would want to, but some minority non-Muslim in Indonesia prize them as food.

Some African cultures avoid fish. It may be that they were herders and institutionalized a fish taboo to prevent the major change in culture that would result from adopting fishing, a fixed occupation.

It's no more true that "they eat dogs in Asia" than "they eat squirrels in America." Dogs as food are limited to a few regions and not really seen much outside of China, Vietnam, and Korea. Most Asian cultures reject it on various grounds, some religious, as do Hindi, Muslims, and Jews. I think it's possible that the taboos arose where dogs were developed form wolves as extremely valuable to hunting and protecting crops where large herbivores were numerous. Too much value to eat. If a people gave up hunting very early, they weren't so valuable any more. The beef taboo in some places is on account of the opinion that it's ungrateful to eat such an otherwise helpful and productive animal.

The eating of cats in China has some especially odd aspects. It's centered in one region, and Chinese in many other regions object to it. Even where they are popular, it's often referred to by euphemisms, like "roof hare," just as other cultures referred to human meat as "long pig." They are eaten, but not proudly.

Sometimes, it's more a matter of having nothing else. In ancient Mexico, there were no large domesticated animals. Dogs and turkey were about it, so dogs had value as food but not as hunters. It's not always that way. Plains Indians were hunters and gatherers but enjoyed their dog stew. But they were subject to annual periods of near starvation, so the habit kept being reinforced. Jews can't eat camel. But Muslims can, a departure from the cloven hoof rule, maybe because there aren't many sources of meet where they were living.

There are even vegetable taboos, mostly onion type plants. But some taboo root vegetables, because you have to kill the plant to eat them.

Sheep and goats seem to be okay everywhere, except for institutional vegetarians, like Zoroastrians.
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Old 01-06-2012, 11:45 AM   #536
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Dog meat is a common food throughout Asia. You will see dogs kept in cages in marketplaces.
For 10 years +, my unpaid job was caring for Saint Bernards that people threw away. I have the urn of ashes of each one that did not make it because of the neglect suffered. I do not wish to discuss cultural differences. I respect that the cow is sacred in India, but do not respect that animals are tortured before slaugther in Asian countries. I've held dogs in my arms that have cried like babies because of pain and suffering. Don't even go there with me.
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Old 01-06-2012, 12:56 PM   #537
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North

I first entered the world of cooking at the tender age of 4 years. At the time, I stayed with my mother on week-days, and with my father on week-ends. They were divorced and lived on opposite sides of the town (small town). I was at Mom's house and she was baking stuffed acorn squash in the oven. This was back in 1959. I made my way to the stove/range and twisted the oven dial a bit. I increased the oven temperature, innocently of course. The squash was burned and I got the strap, literally. I still remember how much it stung on my little bare bottom. I never touched the stove again, without close adult supervision until I was about 12. By then, I knew how to make pancakes, fried eggs, and could could heat up a can of beans with hot dogs as well as anyone, not to mention "Chef Boy-Ar-Dee" (sp) pizza kits. But it was the breaded, fried sardines that caught my parents attention. And I've been experimenting ever since.

Now I'm sure that many of my early experiments would be things not wanted on any plate. But my rule was, and is - if I make it, I gotta eat it.

How many of you can remember cooking that first, perfect grilled cheese sandwich, or your first perfect beef roast on the charcoal grill, with everything from well done, to rare on the same roast, something for everyone.

I can cook so many more kinds of food than could my parents. But I can't make goulash, Great Lakes style, or pan fried, fresh, Lake Superior Brook Trout as good as my Dad could(of course that may have something to do with the quality of the fish). Nor can I top my Mother's chili, or baked foods (though I can make baked goods as good, and better pasties).

What my parents and grandparents made, they made very, very good. I've just branched out more into the world's cuisines than they did.

Do I love cooking? My wife gave up on cooking early in our marriage as I was always pestering her to try this, and change that, and add a bit of this, to her already good recipes. She threw up her hands one day and said, "That's it. I quit. The kitchen is yours." I've been the chef in my house ever since (chef means chief of the kitchen, and in my house, that's me.).

Here's a challenge for you. My oldest sister and I used to see who could make, and eat the most ridiculous sandwich. One would make it, and the other had to eat it. The challenge is to take a bit of anything available from the fridge and make a sandwich out of it. Then the person you are playing with must eat it, and return the favor. Mooohuahahahaha.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I also started cooking at a young age- my mom would assign us all jobs, starting with stirring things, and peeling vegetables, and getting more complex as we got older. It was great that she was patient with us and insisted we be in the kitchen to learn and witness how things work. I have a friend whose mother wouldn't let her in the kitchen because she was viewed as a pest, and I am not exaggerating, she can barely cook Mac and cheese.
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Old 01-06-2012, 02:23 PM   #538
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It wasn't so much that I was encouraged to cook, expecially at my Mom's. Rather, I tended to be very independant. If there was no one else to cook for me, I just did it myself. My Dad taught me to make pancakes, and heat up beans and hot dogs, and a pan-fried steak, but that's about it.

At Mom's house, her favorite saying was "get outside and let the wind blow the stink off of ya." Second to that was "Kids are to be seen and not heard." Maybe that's why I was so fiercely independant. When there's no one to teach you how to do things, or to entertain you, you learn to do everything yourself.


I have always been that guy that had to know how to do everything. And when I was introduced to new foods and flavors, I had to learn how to make them. It's just who I am, and what I do.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:14 PM   #539
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For 10 years +, my unpaid job was caring for Saint Bernards that people threw away. I have the urn of ashes of each one that did not make it because of the neglect suffered. I do not wish to discuss cultural differences. I respect that the cow is sacred in India, but do not respect that animals are tortured before slaughter in Asian countries. I've held dogs in my arms that have cried like babies because of pain and suffering. Don't even go there with me.
You've made me curious CWS. These people keep these animals as food stock. How and why would they "torture" the animals prior to it's intended use? It just makes no sense to me.

Excuse me if this sounds insensitive, but cows are not treated very well prior to slaughter either. They keep them in pens, walking around in feces, over crowded, and then shoot a bolt of steel through their heads to kill them. This is done about 100,000 times a day in just the USA.

I'm very sorry for you having had your terrible experiences, but I don't see any difference between "Humanely" murdering a cow by shooting it in the head, and killing dogs to eat them.

Imagine how you would feel if you really loved cows and rescued a few of them from a slaughterhouse before they got shot in the head.

I'm looking at this realistically, not emotionally. Seriously, if you had to shoot a cow in the head, skin and butcher it and wrap each "still warm" piece of it in freezer paper, how would you feel about eating hamburger?

Surely you don't think a cow enjoys it's treatment prior to being murdered? I watched a clip about Kobe Beef Cows that showed a young cow romping and having so much fun in its field. Standing so still while this Japanese guy brushed it's skin with a soft brush while petting it.

The little thing was obviously having a great time playing while being fattened up for murdering.

All kidding aside; what's the difference? Cows have feelings too!

As do all creatures that we accept the killing of. I think your upset is because of your personal experience with a few of the dogs you've cared for. I understand your feelings, but don't understand how you condone the slaughter of all the billions of other creatures.

We become numb to cruelty in huge numbers. We all think that because we *want* that steak on our plate, cooked rare with taters slid up next to it, that the cow was treated as good as possible prior to slamming a steel bolt into it's head.

I think that's nothing more than selective reasoning and a case of fooling oneself. Mankind has killed creatures for food for millions of years, never caring much about how it must feel for the creatures he murders.

My niece, who is a animal loving person who also works with Great Dane rescue, explained this all to me one day while we were discussing her being a vegan.

I understand her point of view and I understand yours as well, but that part of me is going to remain numb so I can enjoy my steaks.

I'm very sorry if this topic upsets you, but I won't be scolded for thinking the same exact way everyone who eats beef thinks, weather they admit it or not.

In many countries, a dog is thought of exactly as a cow is thought of in the USA... Food. Nothing more, nothing less. It's handlers care no more about it's feelings than someone who works in a cow slaughterhouse cares about a cows feelings.
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:39 PM   #540
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Tim, I think a lot of the emotion comes from how dogs are loved as members of the family in this country. Cows are not.

Think back to the Michael Vick/dog fighting/killing business of a few years ago. He was vilified and received a stiff prison sentence. A much harsher sentence than another pro football player who killed a human while drunk driving. Vick is still hounded by people because of his crimes.

You can't take the emotion out of it.
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