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Old 01-13-2012, 12:41 PM   #631
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Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
taxlady, I'm right there with you on that one! I can't stand cooked salmon other than smoked. I love smoked salmon. I think I could eat my own body weight of it.
I love cold smoked salmon. I adore gravad laks. Just don't go spoiling my salmon by cooking it.

BTW, have you ever tried gravad laks? It's very similar to smoked salmon with a subtler/more refined flavour. And, you can make it at home in your fridge!
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:46 PM   #632
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I love cold smoked salmon. I adore gravad laks. Just don't go spoiling my salmon by cooking it.

BTW, have you ever tried gravad laks? It's very similar to smoked salmon with a subtler/more refined flavour. And, you can make it at home in your fridge!
Not only have I never tasted it, but until now, I'd never even heard of it.

Please tell me more! Do you have a recipe for making it?

This is what I found on Wiki:

"During the Middle Ages, gravlax was made by fishermen, who salted the salmon and lightly fermented it by burying it in the sand above the high-tide line. The word gravlax comes from the Scandinavian word grav, which literally means "grave" or "to dig" (in Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch and Estonian), and lax (or laks), which means "salmon", thus gravlax means "buried salmon".

Today fermentation is no longer used in the production process. Instead the salmon is "buried" in a dry marinade of salt, sugar, and dill, and cured for a few days. As the salmon cures, by the action of osmosis, the moisture turns the dry cure into a highly concentrated brine, which can be used in Scandinavian cooking as part of a sauce. This same method of curing can be used for any fatty fish, but salmon is the most common."

EDIT: Just found a simple recipe for making it:

http://www.hub-uk.com/tallyrecip01/recipe0042.htm
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:24 PM   #633
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
Not only have I never tasted it, but until now, I'd never even heard of it.

Please tell me more! Do you have a recipe for making it?

This is what I found on Wiki:

"During the Middle Ages, gravlax was made by fishermen, who salted the salmon and lightly fermented it by burying it in the sand above the high-tide line. The word gravlax comes from the Scandinavian word grav, which literally means "grave" or "to dig" (in Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch and Estonian), and lax (or laks), which means "salmon", thus gravlax means "buried salmon".

Today fermentation is no longer used in the production process. Instead the salmon is "buried" in a dry marinade of salt, sugar, and dill, and cured for a few days. As the salmon cures, by the action of osmosis, the moisture turns the dry cure into a highly concentrated brine, which can be used in Scandinavian cooking as part of a sauce. This same method of curing can be used for any fatty fish, but salmon is the most common."

EDIT: Just found a simple recipe for making it:

Gravlax, Gravad laks, Gravlaks Recipe - Recipes by Tallyrand
I agree with everything except the last paragraph that you quoted.

Here's one of the recipes that I use: Gravlaks. I have also used Julia Child's recipe from The Way to Cook with good results. I have never made it in less than three days. I also cut down the recipe a whole lot and make a much smaller amount. Here's another modern Scandinavian recipe for it: Gravlaks

BTW, I buy frozen salmon. Commercially frozen salmon should be parasite free. If you buy fresh salmon for this, either buy sushi grade or google to see how long you need to freeze it at home to make sure any parasites are dead.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:26 PM   #634
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I love cold smoked salmon. I adore gravad laks. Just don't go spoiling my salmon by cooking it.

BTW, have you ever tried gravad laks? It's very similar to smoked salmon with a subtler/more refined flavour. And, you can make it at home in your fridge!
I love creamed salmon and peas over mashed taters. A traditional dish for July 4th. Will pick at smoked salmon. BRW, Mom and Pop stores during the salmon run in the NW, keep a tray of smoked salmon on their countertop and the kids buy it by the square piece on the way to school in the morning. Sort of like I used to buy oily pizza as a teenager.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:55 PM   #635
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I agree with everything except the last paragraph that you quoted.

Here's one of the recipes that I use: Gravlaks. I have also used Julia Child's recipe from The Way to Cook with good results. I have never made it in less than three days. I also cut down the recipe a whole lot and make a much smaller amount. Here's another modern Scandinavian recipe for it: Gravlaks

BTW, I buy frozen salmon. Commercially frozen salmon should be parasite free. If you buy fresh salmon for this, either buy sushi grade or google to see how long you need to freeze it at home to make sure any parasites are dead.
Thank you so much for this recipe. Gravlaks , of those I've read now, this one is my favorite. I'll be doing this soon!

btw, any meat frozen at minus 4F for 7 days will be free of parasites. I have a sushi freezer I use for this that maintains -20F

I'll buy fresh fillets and freeze them prior to making this recipe.
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Old 01-13-2012, 02:09 PM   #636
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
Thank you so much for this recipe. Gravlaks , of those I've read now, this one is my favorite. I'll be doing this soon!

btw, any meat frozen at minus 4F for 7 days will be free of parasites. I have a sushi freezer I use for this that maintains -20F

I'll buy fresh fillets and freeze them prior to making this recipe.
Sushi freezer

I wouldn't bother turning the salmon more than every 12 hours, unless you want to turn it every 6 hours. Sometimes I want to check on it

I tried the mustard sauce and didn't much like it. YMMV. Oops, I haven't tried that one. It was a different recipe I didn't like.
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Old 01-13-2012, 02:49 PM   #637
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i made refrigerator gravlax a year or two ago using a recipe from cooking for engineers.

it was ok, but too salty for me. maybe i let it salt too long, or didn't rinse it well enough.
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Old 01-13-2012, 03:40 PM   #638
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Gravlaks. A friend of mine (who happens to be from Greenland), makes excellent Gravlaks. I like mine with lots of fresh dill, so besides the salmon, I need to be able to get fresh dill as well. TL--is there a type of salmon you prefer (Atlantic vs. Pacific vs. Alaskan)? This is on my 2012 Bucket list--to make gravlaks. I've been nervous about doing so because I question the freshness of the salmon available. But I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE gravlaks.
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Old 01-13-2012, 04:49 PM   #639
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cws, the recipe i used has you wrap the salmon in a load of dill, then encase it in salt. the dill is a must, imo.
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Old 01-13-2012, 05:08 PM   #640
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Several years ago, I made gravlax from salmon we caught from Lake Huron. It was really good. Fresh dill was key.
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