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Old 09-06-2013, 10:49 AM   #711
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Sweet potatoes and/or yams mixed with marshmallows seems so gross to me that I've sometimes convinced other people to cook something else if I'm invited, or let me bring the yams.

Yams are already sweet. No need to add candy to them.

One year for Thanksgiving instead of making them candied I sliced them and baked them in a sauce similar to scalloped potatoes. I was the only one who ate them. I will make them candied for my family, but I will only eat them plain myself.
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Old 09-06-2013, 12:26 PM   #712
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I have never even heard of these foods, except for chubs. I heard of them but don't really know what they are. I would not want to be pulling the head off of anything.
You have be Scandinavian or have Scandinavian roots or live where there are Scandinavians. Not far from where my parents live there is a lefse factory. Around Christmastime, the local Sons of Norway hosts a lutefisk dinner. You can buy lutefisk in the local grocery stores and at the Locker Plant. The local bakeries sell the baked goods mentioned. And, all the restaurants with salad bars have at least one kind of pickled herring on the salad bar year around. I learned how to make the various Christmas baked goods from my grandmother who was 100% Swedish. But I never developed a taste for lutefisk. The lutefisk I tasted was definitely not tasteless and the texture left a lot to be desired.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:31 PM   #713
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You have be Scandinavian or have Scandinavian roots or live where there are Scandinavians. Not far from where my parents live there is a lefse factory. Around Christmastime, the local Sons of Norway hosts a lutefisk dinner. You can buy lutefisk in the local grocery stores and at the Locker Plant. The local bakeries sell the baked goods mentioned. And, all the restaurants with salad bars have at least one kind of pickled herring on the salad bar year around. I learned how to make the various Christmas baked goods from my grandmother who was 100% Swedish. But I never developed a taste for lutefisk. The lutefisk I tasted was definitely not tasteless and the texture left a lot to be desired.
I used to go to a Swedish church. The only things I heard of there was Swedish Meatballs, Swedish Rye Bread and Potatis Korv. I loved it then, but I had it recently and it was too greasy for me.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:04 PM   #714
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I have never even heard of these foods, except for chubs. I heard of them but don't really know what they are. I would not want to be pulling the head off of anything.
A reasonable part of chef duties is doing the butchering. Often a chef encounters the full animal (whether fish, chicken, rabbit or whatever) and has to butcher the meat or fish into cookable portions.

I'm fortunate that as a child I was expected to clean my own trout when my family went camping and fishing. Recently I had to clean my own whole squid and my anti-gag training cleaning trout came through!

I often prefer to purchase a whole chicken and part it out myself. Supermarket butchers have one credo: "do not throw away a single part, put every last bit in a weighed package for sale to customers." As the customer you end up buying a whole bunch of stuff you would toss out or make stock or render the fat and make soap.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:06 PM   #715
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I have never even heard of these foods, except for chubs. I heard of them but don't really know what they are. I would not want to be pulling the head off of anything.
Oh I forgot, chubs invaded the Eastern Sierra (the High Sierras in eastern California) about 25-30 years ago. They are a voracious fish that is well known to fisherman because of their huge amount of bones compared to meat. As far as I know all fisherman just kill chubs when they catch them, and toss them in the trash.

Just to be clear, these fish are not native to the Sierras and were introduced by man whether intentionally or unintentionally I do not know. The only purpose they serve is that they kill game fish and they compete with game fish for food.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:10 PM   #716
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The insects also. Uuuurrrpppp!

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~Cat
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:08 PM   #717
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No, insects are totally off my table, off my plate. I refuse to voluntarily eat insects, although as a matter of practical camping and outdoor cooking I'm certain I have unintentionally eaten insects.

Also, "insect parts" is an ingredient in most grains, usually stated as a minimum. Even the USDA realizes that you can't produce grain without a miniscule amount of insect parts. We're talking about a few ppm (parts per million) here.
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Old 09-07-2013, 01:46 AM   #718
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My college mascot was the Norsemen ( now to be PC it is the Norsk). My home church always has a Christmas Norwegian supper: boiled potatoes, meatballs, fruit soup and all the lefsa one can eat! I love making lefsa. Our family rices boiled potatoes rather than using mashed. However, I can't stand picked herring. But then I'm only 1/8 Norwegian descent! Lol. Not enough Olson fisherman blood in these veins...
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:26 AM   #719
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Originally Posted by Raspberrymocha55 View Post
My college mascot was the Norsemen ( now to be PC it is the Norsk). My home church always has a Christmas Norwegian supper: boiled potatoes, meatballs, fruit soup and all the lefsa one can eat! I love making lefsa. Our family rices boiled potatoes rather than using mashed. However, I can't stand picked herring. But then I'm only 1/8 Norwegian descent! Lol. Not enough Olson fisherman blood in these veins...
Is the area particularly of Norwegian descent, as opposed to Scandinavian?

Norsemen means Northerners/Vikings. Norsk means Norwegian. I've noticed that English speakers get Norse/Norsk confused. E.g., Old Norse isn't Old Norwegian, it's Old Scandinavian/Nordic.
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:11 AM   #720
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My college mascot was the Norsemen ( now to be PC it is the Norsk). My home church always has a Christmas Norwegian supper: boiled potatoes, meatballs, fruit soup and all the lefsa one can eat! I love making lefsa. Our family rices boiled potatoes rather than using mashed. However, I can't stand picked herring. But then I'm only 1/8 Norwegian descent! Lol. Not enough Olson fisherman blood in these veins...
We start with mashed potatoes (cold from the day before) that we then push through the ricer. I must admit, it is the only time I ever think to use my ricer. I do use my lefse grill and stick when I make tortillas. When I was in high school, pickled herring, coleslaw, and gherkins were "road food" when we went to ND to go shopping. I love pickled herring but won't eat it if the jar/container has been opened and been sitting in the fridge more than 12 hours.
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