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Old 06-18-2013, 02:09 AM   #151
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But, to get back to the topic.....what I learned today

I learned that I have a sister who did the same disgusting thing that Addie's daughter use to do. I really do hope my sister grew out of being such a slob.
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Old 06-18-2013, 04:54 PM   #152
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What I learned today: Writing cookbooks is labor intensive. This is my 5th, and possible best. It's for a local Farmer's Market, and when couple with the pictures I've taken at the market, and foods cooked to show the recipes, it should be a great cookbook with valuable info for those who maybe aren't as well versed. I've gotten 1 critique on what's completed so far, and it was very favorable. But it takes about an hour for two recipes. I've got 24 pages of recipes and techniques so far, and that's just for eggs and fish. I think I'm just completing the fish chapter. Next, I think I'll do a chapter on lamb, pork, and poultry. After that, it should be time for veggies to start showing up in the market. But I want to sell this thing, this year. I've got so many recipes to cook already, so I can place a picture with the recipe. So little time, and not enough cash are the biggest obstacles. And I haven't even proofread it yet! But, it will get done, and will be worth what I charge for it, maybe more. I get to spend about an hour per day on this project, usually, my lunch hour.

Writing in general is labor intensive.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-18-2013, 05:06 PM   #153
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
What I learned today: Writing cookbooks is labor intensive. This is my 5th, and possible best. It's for a local Farmer's Market, and when couple with the pictures I've taken at the market, and foods cooked to show the recipes, it should be a great cookbook with valuable info for those who maybe aren't as well versed. I've gotten 1 critique on what's completed so far, and it was very favorable. But it takes about an hour for two recipes. I've got 24 pages of recipes and techniques so far, and that's just for eggs and fish. I think I'm just completing the fish chapter. Next, I think I'll do a chapter on lamb, pork, and poultry. After that, it should be time for veggies to start showing up in the market. But I want to sell this thing, this year. I've got so many recipes to cook already, so I can place a picture with the recipe. So little time, and not enough cash are the biggest obstacles. And I haven't even proofread it yet! But, it will get done, and will be worth what I charge for it, maybe more. I get to spend about an hour per day on this project, usually, my lunch hour.

Writing in general is labor intensive.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief do you use a template for your cookbook and if so could you share that information.

I have been working on three different ones, not for sale. A cookbook of family favorites, a food diary that goes week by week through the year and a low cost food pantry book for seniors and singles.

You are correct it is tedious but, if keeps me off the streets!
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Old 06-18-2013, 06:46 PM   #154
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Mad Cook, his Mom raised his right. Once the kids came along I stayed at home and spoiled him rotten. During his working years I ruined him terribly; now that he's home all time time I'm afraid he's broken. That old dog is not interested in relearning old tricks. Perhaps I'll feed him PB&J sandwiches until he pitches in.
\My maternal grandmother did everything for the men in her family even to the extent of cleaning her sons' muddy work boots every day. On my parents' wedding day in 1942, mum's father-in-law took her on one side and said "Don't ever let me see you cleaning your husband's shoes. He's marrying you to look after you - you are not marrying him to be his servant."

My parents had a very good marriage and shared everything fairly. Dad retired before Mum and he took over the running of the household. When he became ill and Mum retired she took over but Dad always tried to do his bit.

I have to confess that I've been spoiled by their example and I am very hard to please.
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Old 06-18-2013, 07:55 PM   #155
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Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
Chief do you use a template for your cookbook and if so could you share that information.

I have been working on three different ones, not for sale. A cookbook of family favorites, a food diary that goes week by week through the year and a low cost food pantry book for seniors and singles.

You are correct it is tedious but, if keeps me off the streets!
Here's the basic outline:

Header with Copyright. Page number in lower right corner of pages.
Title
Introduction
Table of Contents
(made as I create chapters)
Chapter subject (types of foods in chapter, as in Poultry, Red Meat, Veggies, etc.)
Any special Sauces or techniques that will be used in the book
Intro to recipe
Appropriate Pictures
technique

tools
Ingredients
Text explaining procedures


Next Chapter subject (types of foods in chapter, as in Poultry, Red Meat, Veggies, etc.)
Any special Sauces or techniques that will be used in the book
Intro to recipe
Appropriate Pictures
technique

tools
Ingredients
Text explaining procedures

Repeat as needed

Recipe Index
Glossary of Terms

And there you have it, the format of my cookbooks. I like to add conversational sentences into the instructional text, along with anecdotes, light humor, and the occasional pun, just to keep things light, and not like reading a textbook. I also give a bit of the history of recipes, if they have a unique story.

Good luck writing you cookbook. It's sure to become a family heirloom.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:05 PM   #156
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...
I like to add conversational sentences into the instructional text, along with anecdotes, light humor, and the occasional pun, just to keep things light, and not like reading a textbook. I also give a bit of the history of recipes, if they have a unique story...
My absolutely favorite cookbook (one of three given to me as a shower gift from a friend's personal collection ) has a lot of recipes, but not one of them is formatted the usual way. It reads like a novel full of love for friends and food, with the recipes in the body of the "story", maked with a recipe title in bold caps.

If you ever run across the book at a used book store I highly recommend picking it up. It is by Edward Harris Heth; the copy I have is titled "The Wonderful World of Cooking". I googled it and found a few copies on Amazon by that title but also found an entry saying it was reissued under the title of "The Country Kitchen Cookbook". It even has a Kindle version!
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Old 06-19-2013, 05:45 AM   #157
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My absolutely favorite cookbook (one of three given to me as a shower gift from a friend's personal collection ) has a lot of recipes, but not one of them is formatted the usual way. It reads like a novel full of love for friends and food, with the recipes in the body of the "story", maked with a recipe title in bold caps.

If you ever run across the book at a used book store I highly recommend picking it up. It is by Edward Harris Heth; the copy I have is titled "The Wonderful World of Cooking". I googled it and found a few copies on Amazon by that title but also found an entry saying it was reissued under the title of "The Country Kitchen Cookbook". It even has a Kindle version!
That is a wonderful cookbook!

If you can find a copy check out the dill crock.

He is kind of a cross between Euell Gibbons and Edna Lewis.
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Old 06-19-2013, 02:25 PM   #158
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That is a wonderful cookbook!

If you can find a copy check out the dill crock.

He is kind of a cross between Euell Gibbons and Edna Lewis.
I'm looking at it right now! I have the book sitting right on my computer table. I don't use it for cooking much but I have a couple favorite recipes I go to on occasion. This winter I have to sit and read the entire book like a novel.
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Old 06-21-2013, 09:51 AM   #159
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The only one that wins is the one not keeping score.
That is so true!
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Old 06-21-2013, 10:28 AM   #160
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What I learned years ago:
When purchasing a car, used, or new, from a dealer, laugh at the sticker price. It's inflated to allow the salesman to dicker. You can also find out how much the dealership spent to purchace the new cars on his/her lot, from the manufacturer. That gives you bargaining power. Only uninformed people purchase a car at sticker price.

Example: I was in the market for a used Dodge Caravan, when my children were young. I went to a local dealership and found a vehicle that interested me. DW thought the price was reasonable. I began speaking with the salesman, and pointed out rust bubbles under the paint in a few locations, and worn tread on the tires. I also noticed excessive grease/oil on top of the engine. I said that I would purchase the vehicle at the suggested price, if the rust was removed, and the paint matched against the existing paint, new tires were put on the vehicle, and the gasket that allowed oil seepage was replaced. The dealership happily did the work and accepted my cash.

You can also bargain for big ticket items such as large appliances, such as dishwashers, refrigerators, and other such items, sometimes, even in big ticket stores such as Sears. If they can't lower the price, you can often get them to throw in other items for the price of the appliance. This usually works with furniture stores as well.

The seller's job is to take as much of your money away as you will allow. your job is to hang on to as much of your money as you can, while still paying a fair price. Therein lies the principle of dickering. DW was very surprised how much you can get from a dealership, if you go in with knowledge, and take a good look at what you're purchasing.

Oh, one more thing, if you are truly excite about purchasing something, keep your emotions invisible. That is a surefire way to get the seller to put pressure on you to spend more than you need to. Try to look objective, and like you know what you are doing. Remember, if they can take more cash away from you, they will.

I would trust a good, local, known mechanic to not overcharge me. Their is still integrity in the world. But it rarely exists in dealerships, or big business, at least as I've observed.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Unfortunately I hate bargaining.

Luckily, I have solved the mechanic and car buying. I have a Volvo. I was rear ended in my first Volvo and that made me a believer. . A friend recommended Swedish Auto. The owner and most of the employees have worked for Volvo. They are competent and really nice.

They also sell used Volvos. They don't over inflate the prices for me.

I know a professional car inspector and always pay to have him check out a car I am considering buying. He also checks if the price is reasonable.
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