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Old 12-20-2013, 06:11 PM   #21
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It was one from Costco Dawg, and I expected it to be outstanding considering the eye popping cost of that pig thigh.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:17 PM   #22
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Ah! That's a bummer, Kayelle! Maybe free hams are moister?
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:27 PM   #23
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So is it carved before cooking? It sounds as though some of you cook the ham after it's carved into the spiral. Doesn't that make it dry?

It's cooked first then sliced. It just has to be heated through when you're ready. Though I'm not a big fan of ham, I find them very tasty.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:31 PM   #24
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It's cooked first then sliced. It just has to be heated through when you're ready. Though I'm not a big fan of ham, I find them very tasty.
You say heat, I say warm

I'll bet most people who think hams are dry are actually cooking them as if they are raw.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:36 PM   #25
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I've found that you have to warm them face down so all of the slices stay together and it will stay moist. If you warm it on its side like it is pictured for serving, the slices will slump and spread open allowing it to dry out. Cook face down, turn on its side to serve has worked for me.

I also have a thin, long flexible knife that I run around the bone so that slices can be just lifted off.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:39 PM   #26
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Yep, warm. Or heat. Mine says 325 for 10-12 minutes per lb.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:41 PM   #27
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I've found that you have to warm them face down so all of the slices stay together and it will stay moist. If you warm it on its side like it is pictured for serving, the slices will slump and spread open allowing it to dry out. Cook face down, turn on its side to serve has worked for me.

I also have a thin, long flexible knife that I run around the bone so that slices can be just lifted off.
Good point, Bakechef. That's how I've done mine too.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:02 PM   #28
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I've found that you have to warm them face down so all of the slices stay together and it will stay moist. If you warm it on its side like it is pictured for serving, the slices will slump and spread open allowing it to dry out. Cook face down, turn on its side to serve has worked for me.

I also have a thin, long flexible knife that I run around the bone so that slices can be just lifted off.
Ahh Haa BC......I think you have the secret. Wonder why I didn't think of that? No doubt about it, if it's heated on the side, it dries out by the time it's hot enough to serve. I want the ham hot, although I know some people serve it at room temp. Ack...
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:06 PM   #29
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Ahh Haa BC......I think you have the secret. Wonder why I didn't think of that? No doubt about it, if it's heated on the side, it dries out by the time it's hot enough to serve. I want the ham hot, although I know some people serve it at room temp. Ack...
Last year we were served a Honey Baked Ham straight out of the fridge at a friend's house, I so wanted to warm it up, but didn't want to offend the host.

Yeah, I've seen spiral ham jerky and it definitely not good eats!
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Old 12-20-2013, 11:02 PM   #30
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Good description. If you could remove it from the bone in one piece, you'd have a ham slinky.

The idea of a ham slinky is hysterically funny for some odd reason! Thanks for the giggle :crazy:
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