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Old 11-14-2006, 02:21 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkath
Here in southern California, two things come to mind:
......
boufa, do you have a recipe for Spetzofai?
Posting the recipe for the sausage dish:

SPETZOFAI

Ingredients:
2 pieces Greek spicy sausages or equivalent (purchased from your local butcher) - cut into slices
2 Florina peppers or sweet red peppers - cut into thick long strips (optional)
10-15 Greek green peppers - halved and seeded (or 3 capsicums)
2-3 tomatoes - chopped
1 onion - chopped
1 tsp tomato paste
1/2 tsp chilli paste or 1/4 tsp chilli powder
1 cup olive oil
Salt

Method:
Fry peppers in 1/2 cup of oil to brown well. Remove from pan and fry the sausages. After frying well, remove from pan. Add the rest of the oil. Add onion, tomatoes, salt and chilli paste. Allow the sauce to simmer for about 20 minutes.

Add peppers and the sausage and continue to simmer for a while longer till the sauce thickens.

Note: Florina peppers are included to give the dish added taste.
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Old 11-14-2006, 04:18 AM   #12
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okonomiyaki is the local spacialty here. and may i say, with no undue modesty, that mine is far better than most.
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Old 11-14-2006, 04:48 AM   #13
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Lancashire hot pot, lamb slow cooked with vegetables.

Black pudding, boiled and eaten with piccallilli (a yellow mustard pickle which you either love or hate)

Potato pie, made with lamb and a puff pastry lid

Cheese and onion pie
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Old 11-14-2006, 04:51 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philso
okonomiyaki is the local spacialty here. and may i say, with no undue modesty, that mine is far better than most.
How about sharing your special recipe with us?
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Old 11-14-2006, 04:55 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyles
Lancashire hot pot, lamb slow cooked with vegetables.

Black pudding, boiled and eaten with piccallilli (a yellow mustard pickle which you either love or hate)

Potato pie, made with lamb and a puff pastry lid

Cheese and onion pie
kyles, Is your potato pie a richer version of Shepherd's Pie?
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Old 11-14-2006, 07:50 AM   #16
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Wild rice hotdish, anything made with venison, meat and potatoes.
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Old 11-14-2006, 08:07 AM   #17
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Just a few of our local delicacies (some more 'delicate' than others!)

Haggis
White pudding (savoury)
Black pudding
Steak Pie
mutton pies
Bridies
Venison
Wonderful beef, for steak and for casseroles etc
Great lamb
Ayrshire bacon
Larne Sausage (also known as square sausage)
Porridge
Full Scottish breakfast
Tattie scones
Oatcakes
Mince n tatties
Shepherds/cottage pie

Soups such as Scotch broth, lentil soup, cock a leekie, cullen skink

Scotland is famed for its baking:
Shortbread
Scones - sweet and savoury
Dundee cake
Selkirk bannock
Bannocks
Clootie dumplings
Cranachan
Apple and other fruit pies/crumbles and puddings

Our soft fruits, in season are wonderful

Fish
Shellfish of all types - most of which, sadly, gets exported to France and Spain!
Arbroath smokies
Finnan haddies
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Old 11-14-2006, 08:42 AM   #18
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Well, we certinaly have our whitefish and shellfish here in New England (along with Maine Lobster of course). Personally my favorite local seafood are the Sea Scallops that are incredibly succulent and can approach the size of a tennis ball. Of course New England Clam Chowder is a real biggie, but I'm an oddball that doesn't like clams much. I prefer fish chowder made with haddock or cod.

New England boiled dinner is also big. Corned Beef is traditional, but I grew up with smoked pork shoulder (which I prefer). Boston baked beans is another traditional dish made in crocks with molasses, brown sugar, and salt pork (some use bacon for a smokey flavor).

When it comes to Autumn, I can't think of another place I'd rather be. Turkey's, apples, pumpkins, squash, potatoes, etc. Pretty much feels like Thanksgiving once September 1st hits in my area.

During the summer, sweet corn and berries flood the market. Local farmers usually churn out zucchini and cukes too (in ridiculus numbers). Everything grows fast and furious! It's usually customary in my area to see street vendors working out of vans in oddball places selling their garden crops.

Eastern European (Polish/Lithuanian/etc), Portuguese, and Irish traditions play a pretty big influence in various parts of my state.

I guess to sum it up, hearty "Crock" type dishes, uber-fresh seafood, apples, root/cold weather vegetables, and wild berries are what constitute my area's traditional cuisine. Lots of great Dairy products come out of Vermont as well (along with arguably the best Maple Syrup around).
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Old 11-14-2006, 09:59 AM   #19
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I'm at school right now, so the known foods here are burgers, chicken burgers, fish, fries, poutin, salads, chicken wraps, fruit salads, pastas, soups, cookies, danishes, cinnamon buns, carrot cake, and doughnuts.

hehe
I think I'll get a chicken burger and chocolate milk for lunch
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Old 11-14-2006, 10:59 AM   #20
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Wow, what a great thread! I live quite near Cheddar so of course cheddar features heavily. This little corner of the southwest has massive milk production to, so lots of other cheeses, cream and set creamy puddings are available, like junkets and fools. There is less arable farming in my immeadiacy, more meat, a lot of beef, lamb and most traditionally pork. Somerset is also one of Englands orchard counties. Apples, cider/scrumpy....with pork a real marriage. Many, many local ales and "scrumped" wines (really hedgerow of fruit wines) This time of year the butchers are full of game birds, we even have a cock phesant who has moved in to our hen house. Venison too, is prevalent. We have lots of rabbit too. Chutnies and jams of every sort imaginable are available.Coastal towns have traditional fishes and shell fish, and a nearby town has an annual eel festival where as well as proper eels the delicate elvers are available, neither are to my taste

Of course the cream tea in the south west of UK is famous and heatedly "discussed" amoung the counties.I live on the edge of three counties, Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire. In Dorset you get the Dorset Knob, a sort of dried out round biscuit. I am not keen, frankly they taste like old hard scones to me. Lardy cake is popular here, (though where in UK it originates I am embarrassed to plead ignorance) really there are very, very many local foods here, all being rrediscovered.
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