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Old 11-19-2006, 06:55 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
Well, we certinaly have our whitefish and shellfish here in New England (along with Maine Lobster of course). Personally my favorite local seafood are the Sea Scallops that are incredibly succulent and can approach the size of a tennis ball. Of course New England Clam Chowder is a real biggie, but I'm an oddball that doesn't like clams much. I prefer fish chowder made with haddock or cod.

New England boiled dinner is also big. Corned Beef is traditional, but I grew up with smoked pork shoulder (which I prefer). Boston baked beans is another traditional dish made in crocks with molasses, brown sugar, and salt pork (some use bacon for a smokey flavor).

When it comes to Autumn, I can't think of another place I'd rather be. Turkey's, apples, pumpkins, squash, potatoes, etc. Pretty much feels like Thanksgiving once September 1st hits in my area.

During the summer, sweet corn and berries flood the market. Local farmers usually churn out zucchini and cukes too (in ridiculus numbers). Everything grows fast and furious! It's usually customary in my area to see street vendors working out of vans in oddball places selling their garden crops.

Eastern European (Polish/Lithuanian/etc), Portuguese, and Irish traditions play a pretty big influence in various parts of my state.

I guess to sum it up, hearty "Crock" type dishes, uber-fresh seafood, apples, root/cold weather vegetables, and wild berries are what constitute my area's traditional cuisine. Lots of great Dairy products come out of Vermont as well (along with arguably the best Maple Syrup around).

This is a wonderful description of traditional New England fare! Here in southwestern Connecticut, we are lucky enough to enjoy all the New England favorites but, we're also lucky in being only an hour or two away from New York City that we get a huge influence of multi-cultural fare as well. I'd have to say that Italian-American food is incredibly popular here with a pizza place on almost every corner (mostly thin crust New York style, you know the kind you can fold). And of course, there's New Haven style pizza too.

Almost every deli here will have New England clam chowder on the menu, but we also get a lot of the Manhattan style clam chowder too. A great place to be!
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Old 12-02-2006, 10:51 PM   #52
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Cincinnati chili is huge! Also Goetta and Graeter's Ice Cream.
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Old 12-02-2006, 11:18 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by BlueCat
Italian beef sandwiches seem to be a popular regional food here in the Chicago area. They're delicious. It's slow cooked beef in a broth with Italian spices, served with hot or mild peppers on a crusty French type of bread, sliced lengthwise. I like mine with sweet onion and hot peppers.

BC
Chicago pizza mmmmmmmmmmmmm especially Giordanos :)
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Old 12-02-2006, 11:22 PM   #54
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Something called a horeshoe. Yes and its not that game you play :). Its two pieces of flag bread (toasted or not toasted) with usually some type of meat on the top (i like hamburgers) which they then put fries on top of that. Finally the pour cheese sauce over the top. Everyone i have ever hear of loves them (unless you don't like cheese of course) and they are awesome. Its all in the cheese sauce.
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Old 12-03-2006, 02:13 PM   #55
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Here in central Illinois the major food eaten is "Brand Names". If it is not associated with a brand name, you are not going to find it! People who have lived here for years eat a lot of hot dogs...commerical bun, oscar mayer dog, french's mustard, favorite brand name ketchup, and sometimes relish. And some like it with brand name chili. Side dish would be another hot dog. I love living here and this is just about as American as it gets....enterprising!
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Old 12-03-2006, 02:28 PM   #56
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Nancy G....I thought Shoo-Fly pie was more of a southern pie made of eggs and sugar. I have found many recipes and one had a cake layer between two fillings. What type of Shoo-Fly pie do you make in PA?
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Old 12-03-2006, 03:31 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Here in central Illinois the major food eaten is "Brand Names". If it is not associated with a brand name, you are not going to find it! People who have lived here for years eat a lot of hot dogs...commerical bun, oscar mayer dog, french's mustard, favorite brand name ketchup, and sometimes relish. And some like it with brand name chili. Side dish would be another hot dog. I love living here and this is just about as American as it gets....enterprising!
StirBlue i agree with you on the most part but you forgot the horshoe :). Try to find that anywhere but central IL and i think its awesome. I guess i cook myself so much i am not confined to everything we have around here. I am happy to see that there is another central IL person in here :).
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Old 12-03-2006, 07:21 PM   #58
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ncage1974: I have Best of the Best from Illinois Cookbook; your sandwich is listed on page 129, Horseshoes and is just as described. It also says that a smaller sandwich using only one slice of toast is a Ponyshoe.
I make a sandwich similar to this using hashbrown patties, breaded chuckwagon pattie, american cheese and bun. It's good.
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Old 12-04-2006, 05:32 PM   #59
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We have alot of people of Polish descent here so it'll have to be pierogies.
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