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Old 02-28-2006, 12:02 AM   #1
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What is Cool Whip Lite?

Pardon my ignorance, but what is 'light cool whip'? Is it light whipping cream? I need it in a recipe. Thanks in advance!

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Old 02-28-2006, 12:04 AM   #2
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Ew.... it's fake whipped cream that you can find in the frozen food section of supermarkets. Because it contains no real cream they refer to it as an "edible oil product." If its at all possible I would try to substitute real, homemade (sweetened) whipped cream

What is the recipe that calls for it?
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Old 02-28-2006, 12:11 AM   #3
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Oh, Grumbleebee, it's just for a fruit dip recipe I found in the back pages of the appetizer forum here. It calls for equal parts blueberry yoghurt and light cool whip. I need to serve some morning refreshments to some people next week and thought of serving a fruit platter with this easy dip... Guess this is a diet-conscious recipe. Maybe I'll use real whip cream. Thanks!
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Old 02-28-2006, 12:14 AM   #4
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Well, some people like Cool Whip - I think it tastes like chemicals though. I much prefer the real thing... even if it does contain more calories!

I guess if you are serving it with fruit and mixing it with yogurt it could be good... ?
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Old 02-28-2006, 11:38 AM   #5
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It is definitely a commercial product. I use it often because I have friends who are lactose intolerant. I guess that tells you how much real milk is in it, doesn't it? I'm not much of a baker/desert maker, and I use angel food cake, cool whip, and berries to make a trifle that everyone loves. It ain't real whipped cream, but as we age, we find we have to make compromises. In my case, I trade REAL FULL FAT sour cream in my stroganof, then cheat on the deserts that I don't care about!
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Old 02-28-2006, 01:05 PM   #6
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Chopstix...if it is the recipe I think it is DO NOT SUBSTITUTE! I have done so with disastrous results. Just use regular Cool Whip if you don't want the light variety, but it is much more stable than whipped cream. If you try to substitute the whipped cream the dip gets all runny and disgusting.
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Old 02-28-2006, 08:49 PM   #7
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Thanks Alix for the heads up. Actually I'm a little doubtful that I'll find Cool Whip (light or regular) anywhere in Bangkok. I'll probably need to substitute. I'll see what I can find...
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Old 02-28-2006, 09:00 PM   #8
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Whipping the Cream
To make 2 cups of whipped cream: Use 1 cup of heavy cream
  • Remove the mixing bowl and beaters from the freezer after sufficiently chilled. Be sure to use a bowl big enough to hold the cream once it is whipped. Cream will double in volume. It is also best to use a bowl that is narrow with deep sides. Place the mixing bowl in a larger bowl of ice water.
  • Add 1 cup of heavy cream in the chilled mixing bowl and beat with a hand mixer for 20 to 30 seconds on low until bubbles begin to form.
  • A hand balloon whisk or a stand mixer can also be used to beat the cream. A whisk will take a little longer to get the same results as a hand mixer. If using a stand mixer, be careful because the cream can become overwhipped quickly because the stand mixer generally is more powerful.
  • Increase mixer speed to medium and beat again for approximately 30 seconds. The cream will begin to thicken and the beaters will show a slight trail in the cream.
  • Increase mixer speed to high and beat until the cream begins to thicken and puff up. Just before it gets to the soft peak stage slowly add 2 tablespoons of sugar and any flavoring desired off to the side of the bowl, continue beating. Be sure to move beaters along the sides and bottom of the bowl while whipping the cream.
  • Continue to beat the cream until it forms a soft or stiff peak. This will depend on how you are going to use the whipped cream. If you are going to fold it into another mixture, only beat the cream to a soft peak. If you are using as a topping, garnish or decoration, beat to a stiff peak.
  • For a soft peak, beat until a soft curved peak forms when pulling the beaters straight up out of the mixture. At this point the whipped cream is still soft enough to fold into the other ingredients easily.
  • For a stiffer peak, continue to beat at high speed for 20 to 30 seconds. To check for stiff peaks, pull the beaters straight up out of the whipped cream. The peak should hold its shape and stick tightly to the beaters.

Note: DO NOT overwhip the cream. Once it forms stiff peaks, stop beating. If the cream is overwhipped it will start to separate and curdle.
  • Try to salvage overwhipped cream by adding 1 to 2 tablespoons more of cream and gently whisking them in. Do Not Use mixer to beat in or the same problem will occur.
Stabilizing Whipped Cream


Stabilizing whipped cream gives it a firmer texture and allows it to be used as piping for a decorative border on a cake, prevents it from weeping, and stops it from deflating when mixed with juicy ingredients, such as strawberries and raspberries. Follow instructions below to stabilize whipped cream.
  1. Soak 1/2 teaspoon of plain gelatin in 1 tablespoon of cold water for 5 minutes.
  2. Place the gelatin and cold water in a heat resistant container and set in a small pan of very hot water just until the gelatin is dissolved. If heating on a stove, do not allow the gelatin to boil.
  3. After gelatin has dissolved, set it aside to cool. Allow it to cool to about body temperature. Note: if the gelatin is too hot it will deflate the whipped cream when it is added and if it is allowed to cool too much it will thicken too much and not incorporate into the cream.
  4. Follow instructions above for whipping the cream. Add the gelatin after the sugar and flavoring has been whipped in but before the cream forms soft peaks.
  5. Once the gelatin is incorporated in the whipped cream, beat until cream forms soft peaks, and then stop beating with the electric mixer. Finish whipping with a wire balloon whisk to bring the cream to the desired consistency.
  6. If the whipped cream is to be spread on a cake or dessert, use immediately because it will set quickly and become difficult to spread.
Using gelatin to stabilize whipping cream can be a problem if not done properly. Some other methods that can be used to help stabilize the whipped cream are shown below:
  • Add 2 teaspoons of nonfat dry milk to one cup of cream before whipping.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of light corn syrup to one cup of cream before whipping.
  • Use powdered sugar instead of granulated sugar when sweetening. Powdered sugar generally contains cornstarch which helps stabilize the whipped cream.
  • Incorporate a melted marshmallow into the whipped cream towards the end of whipping.
  • Use a commercial type stabilizer that binds the liquid parts of the cream, helping to stabilize it. One of the types available is Dr. Oetker's Whip It.
ETA: www.hormel.com/templates/knowledge/ knowledge.asp?catitemid=17&id=962 - 52k
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Old 02-28-2006, 09:12 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=grumblebee]Well, some people like Cool Whip - I think it tastes like chemicals though. I much prefer the real thing... even if it does contain more calories.

Grumble, you won't believe this, but I really like Cool Whip better than whipped cream. And I can even deal with the lite, just NOT the fat free.
My mom and grandma always used real whipped cream, and I never cared for it.

I also prefer Miracle Whip to real mayonnaise.

I apologize for being so plebian.
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Old 02-28-2006, 11:47 PM   #10
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Chopstix - the actual product name is Cool Whip Lite. Here is the Kraft Foods web page that lists all of the various Cool Whip varities and links you to the ingredients/nutritional information for each.

I agree with Alix - Cool Whip (any varity) would be much more stable in this application than regular whipped cream due to the stabalizers it contains. But if Cool Whip isn't available where you live - purrfectlydevine's info for stabalized whipped cream should give you a satisfactory substitution.
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