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Old 03-10-2015, 09:34 PM   #31
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Thanks for those links.
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Old 03-10-2015, 10:18 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
The dirty rice we make leans to the Cajun side of LA cooking. Using chicken livers, ground pork, Cajun seasoning, the trinity, chicken or pork stock and long grain, white rice. It is a one pot dish in the fashion of jambalaya. Don't judge a dish by it's name!

It does call for gizzards, but we don't like them.
Thank you, Craig, for the first informative reply to my question.
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Old 03-10-2015, 10:24 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I use Paul Prudhomme's recipe from his Louisana Kitchen cookbook. It calls for both gizzards and chicken liver along with ground pork. I love it. SO will eat it as long as I don't remind her what's in it.
Thank you, Andy
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Old 03-10-2015, 11:23 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Um... yeah. You mean kind of like "bubble and squeak" or "cock-a-leekie soup" sound appetizing?

Toad-in-the-hole or Spotted Dick anyone?

I don't think you Brits don't have much room to complain in this department.
(sigh!)
Bubble and squeak - now a vegetable dish but originally, in the 19th century, was a way of using up left over roast beef and cabbage. The name comes from the sound it made in the frying pan as this extract from a poem of the time says.
"When midst the frying pan, in accents savage,
The beef so surly, quarrels with the cabbage."

Cock-a-leekie soup (originally and more correctly Cockie Leekie) - cock(ie)=cockerel (Male chicken and usually a rather elderly one) Leekie=leek, a vegetable related to the onion family. A Scottish speciality


Toad in the Hole - 18th century origins - originally any cheap meat baked in Yorkshire pudding batter but now almost always sausages. In the past it was food for the poor but none the worse for all that. Origins of name lost in the mists of time. Served with steamed green veg and onion gravy in our family.

Spotted dick - (Do grow up, children, and stop sniggering!) a pudding (or dessert to you), comprising suet pastry rolled round a filling of dried fruit (currants or sometimes raisins) and steamed in a cloth. Filling and inexpensive, depending on how many currants went in to it. "Dick" is a 19th century Yorkshire word for any sort of pudding (origins unknown) - known to any generations of schoolchildren as "dead baby".

I do hope this helps further your understanding of other nations' recipes as your answer failed to do for mine
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Old 03-10-2015, 11:33 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
Yes true...moderation is fine. However, since I don't really enjoy eating rice (pretty tasteless/bland without help) then it is no sacrifice for me to forego it.

What's wrong with chocolate cake then? Saturated fats? Hardly something eaten regularly I would have thought i.e. as rice may be.
Not so long ago coconut oil was the kiss of death and would fur up your arteries and give you a heart attack if it didn't do a catalogue of other bad things but it seems to have been rehabilitated as the new great hope of mankind.

Ditto butter - it's now almost good for you if you believe all you read

Conversely, fruit seems to be going the opposite way with fruit juice being the latest work of the devil (due to its sugar content)


You eat - you die
You don't - you die
Can't win really.
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Old 03-10-2015, 11:46 PM   #36
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Don't play so innocent. Your "question" wasn't so much a question as much as it was a snide comment on how the name of a particular American dish sounded unappealing to your ears. Several of us merely pointed out the ridiculousness of your statement in light of a number of British foods with equally unappealing names.

Honestly, if you want to dish it out (pun intended) then I suggest you also be willing to take it.
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Old 03-10-2015, 11:56 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Don't play so innocent. Your "question" wasn't so much a question as much as it was a snide comment on how the name of a particular American dish sounded unappealing to your ears. Several of us merely pointed out the ridiculousness of your statement in light of a number of British foods with equally unappealing names.

Honestly, if you want to dish it out (pun intended) then I suggest you also be willing to take it.
Actually, it WAS a genuine question about a dish which I have seen mentioned on here but had never heard of elsewhere. I don't need to be snide about anything.

I rather think your last sentence applies to yourself
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Old 03-11-2015, 05:42 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
(sigh!)
Bubble and squeak - now a vegetable dish but originally, in the 19th century, was a way of using up left over roast beef and cabbage. The name comes from the sound it made in the frying pan as this extract from a poem of the time says.
"When midst the frying pan, in accents savage,
The beef so surly, quarrels with the cabbage."

Cock-a-leekie soup (originally and more correctly Cockie Leekie) - cock(ie)=cockerel (Male chicken and usually a rather elderly one) Leekie=leek, a vegetable related to the onion family. A Scottish speciality


Toad in the Hole - 18th century origins - originally any cheap meat baked in Yorkshire pudding batter but now almost always sausages. In the past it was food for the poor but none the worse for all that. Origins of name lost in the mists of time. Served with steamed green veg and onion gravy in our family.

Spotted dick - (Do grow up, children, and stop sniggering!) a pudding (or dessert to you), comprising suet pastry rolled round a filling of dried fruit (currants or sometimes raisins) and steamed in a cloth. Filling and inexpensive, depending on how many currants went in to it. "Dick" is a 19th century Yorkshire word for any sort of pudding (origins unknown) - known to any generations of schoolchildren as "dead baby".

I do hope this helps further your understanding of other nations' recipes as your answer failed to do for mine
Well explained and discreetly handled!
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