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Old 04-30-2015, 12:19 PM   #31
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I think when most people talk about "fishy taste" or "fishy smell", they are talking about fish that isn't fresh enough. I know that smell. A friend of mine calls it "harbour at low tide smell". Definitely something I want to avoid.
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:22 PM   #32
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I think when most people talk about "fishy taste" or "fishy smell", they are talking about fish that isn't fresh enough. I know that smell. A friend of mine calls it "harbour at low tide smell". Definitely something I want to avoid.

I take the comment to mean they don't like stronger flavored fish but prefer milder flavored fish. I don't think degree of freshness is the key here.
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:31 PM   #33
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Grouper is not a sustainable fish. Here is a recent study on sustainable seafood:

Sustainable Seafood - Eartheasy.com Solutions for Sustainable Living

Mexico has it figured out. They have a specific season for grouper, for four months or so it's illegal to catch them.
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:43 PM   #34
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I like Walleye, too. There's a local restaurant that serves it and I used to order it often, but in the past year they have changed the way they prepare it and I don't like it anymore. It used to be cooked darker, like they put it under the broiler, but now it's lighter, swimming in a pool of butter. Not my thing. I have even asked that it be cooked "well done" but was still not happy with it.
I'm a bit confused about this. Fish should never be "well done". That just makes it dry and often tough. Typically, a white fleshed fish should be cooked just until it flakes, or in some cases just until it's opaque.

I don't understand the "swimming in a pool of butter", if that's really what it is. I sometimes do fish (I've done cod, tilapia, grouper, wahoo all this way) in a foil packet with a butter and lemon sauce. Because of the sealed packet, any juices the fish gives off, as well as some water from the ring of onion and ring of bell pepper that I wrap up with it, it comes out of the foil with a nicely flavored but very thin and lemony sauce that I serve with the fish. Yes, there is butter in the sauce (and it looks like there is more than there is), but it's more water than anything. However, the fish is definitely cooked through, and wonderfully moist and tender. If something like that sauce is a problem for you then you like a different breed of fish than I do.

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Mexico has it figured out. They have a specific season for grouper, for four months or so it's illegal to catch them.
I said earlier that the Bahamas has the same regulation. It allows the fish to spawn unmolested by legal fishing, although poaching by other nations is still rampant.
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:45 PM   #35
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Grouper is not a sustainable fish. Here is a recent study on sustainable seafood:

Sustainable Seafood - Eartheasy.com Solutions for Sustainable Living
Check other sources. This particular site is just a guy with a blog. His family and he are using it to make a living. Read the About Us page.

If you check more recent information, like that from the NOAA, you find that the work done to limit seasons and catches have been successful in restoring the grouper populations.
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:00 PM   #36
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I take the comment to mean they don't like stronger flavored fish but prefer milder flavored fish. I don't think degree of freshness is the key here.
I agree with you, Andy. Grouper is a sweet, mild tasting fish, with a texture a bit firmer and denser than cod, but not as dense as halibut or sea bass. Grouper sandwich is a standard on almost any menu in my area that has seafood. Because of its popularity, the catches are controlled, and the price is higher than most similar white fishes.

The most common ways you find it on sandwiches are blackened or deep fried in batter, but you can usually ask for it grilled. The same cooking methods dominate non-sandwich preparations as well.

It doesn't have the oily or fattiness of some of the stronger fish like salmon, bluefish, tuna, etc, so of itself it's not as rich. But since the preparation often includes frying, it can be greasy if poorly prepared.

Several studies (not quoting - some seem legit, some shady) have turned up data that indicates as many as 50% of the restaurants serving 'grouper' are really serving something else. Apparently, once it's battered, fried, put in a bun and loaded with tartar sauce, most people can't distinguish it from haddock or cod, both of which are a lot cheaper than grouper.
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:55 PM   #37
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...Several studies (not quoting - some seem legit, some shady) have turned up data that indicates as many as 50% of the restaurants serving 'grouper' are really serving something else. Apparently, once it's battered, fried, put in a bun and loaded with tartar sauce, most people can't distinguish it from haddock or cod, both of which are a lot cheaper than grouper.
I've seen/heard the same thing. Destroys your faith in your fellow man.
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Old 04-30-2015, 02:11 PM   #38
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Several studies (not quoting - some seem legit, some shady) have turned up data that indicates as many as 50% of the restaurants serving 'grouper' are really serving something else. Apparently, once it's battered, fried, put in a bun and loaded with tartar sauce, most people can't distinguish it from haddock or cod, both of which are a lot cheaper than grouper.
That is the reason I don't order fish at restaurants. There are exceptions, such as the places that display and let you pick the fish you want. Then they prep it in front of you. They are few and far between. Besides, I think we do a better job at home than any restaurant could possibly do.
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Old 05-01-2015, 10:03 AM   #39
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I'm a bit confused about this. Fish should never be "well done". That just makes it dry and often tough. Typically, a white fleshed fish should be cooked just until it flakes, or in some cases just until it's opaque.

I don't understand the "swimming in a pool of butter", if that's really what it is.

I can't tell you exactly what they are doing different, but I liked it when it was "darker" without the butter or whatever it is it is now in. It tasted delicious to me before. Not so much, now. And I don't like sauces on my fish, or even my meat for that matter.
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