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Old 10-23-2011, 10:12 PM   #1
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What is the difference between broth, stock and consomme?

I'm confused. Seems they are all the same???

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Old 10-23-2011, 10:48 PM   #2
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Stock, and broth can be interchangeable, imo.

Consumme is a stock that has had time to simmer away, strain out the solids, skim off the fat, and then chilled. Mix in a raft and bring up to temp(almost a real light simmer), making sure not to boil. . .the raft of mirepoix and egg white capture any solids/left over bits/anu npurities, leaving you a virtually crystal clear broth. The raft floats from the top and can carefully be removed, though a true consumme pot has a spicket on the bottom to drain out the consumme. . .the same effect can be had with patience, cheesecloth, and a china cap too, just takes a lot of patience.

at this point, a broth and a consumme can be the same, lol.
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Old 10-23-2011, 10:58 PM   #3
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I have the bones from the lamb I picked up for sausage slow roasting in the oven--I added rosemary, mint, bay, onion, garlic, red wine. Any thing else? I browned the bones first...it is tasting very "lamby" at the moment, but it has, IMO, about 8 hours to go at 250.
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Old 10-24-2011, 01:41 AM   #4
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Well, I've kind of picked up that some people here distinguish broth from stock by whether or not the bones are cooked in it.

I can make a broth by boiling a chicken thigh.

It starts to be a stock after I strip the meat from the bone, and throw the bone back in the broth and let it boil awhile longer.

Some people brown bones in the oven. I'll let them explain the procedure.

For instance: I made pork stock today. I had already braised the pork shoulder. I stripped the meat from the bone and packaged for the freezer, keeping out a portion for pork taco meat.

I kept the original braising liquid, returned the bone (with meat) to the pot.

I let it cook for another hour or so, and took the meat loaded bone out to cool.

I stripped the meat from the bone, set it aside, and returned the bone to the pot.

I let it cook another hour or so, then poured off some of the stock for the freezer.

I poured 1/2 bag of 15 bean mixture into the pot and along with the pork shoulder bones, got things bubbling again. According to the directions, I added a can of diced stewed tomatoes, and the packet of "HamBone" seasoning that came with the pkg. of beans.

I returned the "bone meat" to the mix and had myself a bowlful.

Mmmmmmm.

Well, you asked!
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Old 10-24-2011, 05:46 AM   #5
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I brown the bones (beef, pork, or lamb) on the stove top. Then I put the bones in a roaster, add some water/wine, a bit of vinegar, carrot, celery, bay, S&P. I then roast the bones in the oven for 8-12 hours at 250. Strain, chill, remove the fat. Stock is "jelly" and brown--such a rich beef/pork/lamb flavor...with lamb, I add rosemary and lots of mint. For turkey or chicken, I take the roasted chicken/turkey, remove as much meat as possible from the carcass, crack the big bones, add water, carrot, celery, bay, S&P, a teaball of pickling spices, and grated fennel, pop the roaster back in the oven (pan drippings in the roaster), and let that cook for 6-8 hours at 250, strain, chill, take off the fat, and then that is what goes into soup, or in the freezer for another time. I don't clarify it--although I might start doing that since I have a surplus of eggs...from my hens...I won't say how FRESH those eggs are (oops). I guess that would qualify as consumme. I can't be bothered to cook chicken, etc., on the stove anymore for broth, I prefer the depth of flavor of stock. I was sold on the beef stock in the oven after the first time I made it--the house smells so good while it is cooking! I also make it without any seasoning--equally as good. Reminds me, probably time to strain the lamb stock I was cooking overnight...
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Old 10-24-2011, 07:24 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I brown the bones (beef, pork, or lamb) on the stove top. Then I put the bones in a roaster, add some water/wine, a bit of vinegar, carrot, celery, bay, S&P. I then roast the bones in the oven for 8-12 hours at 250. Strain, chill, remove the fat. Stock is "jelly" and brown--such a rich beef/pork/lamb flavor...with lamb, I add rosemary and lots of mint. For turkey or chicken, I take the roasted chicken/turkey, remove as much meat as possible from the carcass, crack the big bones, add water, carrot, celery, bay, S&P, a teaball of pickling spices, and grated fennel, pop the roaster back in the oven (pan drippings in the roaster), and let that cook for 6-8 hours at 250, strain, chill, take off the fat, and then that is what goes into soup, or in the freezer for another time. I don't clarify it--although I might start doing that since I have a surplus of eggs...from my hens...I won't say how FRESH those eggs are (oops). I guess that would qualify as consumme. I can't be bothered to cook chicken, etc., on the stove anymore for broth, I prefer the depth of flavor of stock. I was sold on the beef stock in the oven after the first time I made it--the house smells so good while it is cooking! I also make it without any seasoning--equally as good. Reminds me, probably time to strain the lamb stock I was cooking overnight...
Okay, my first question is what do eggs have to do with clarifying?

I got a really rich brown jelly from braising the pork shoulder. Since I put the bones back in I'd call it stock. I haven't tried roasting the bones. It seems they're always boiling in the pot.

What's consumme? I have a general idea, but where do you draw the line? Is consumme more jelly like?
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Old 10-24-2011, 07:25 AM   #7
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Stock you remove the solids, broth you add meat from the animal that you used for making the stock back into the stock with some veggies.

Consomme is easy, you can do the egg white thing but... you just mix some gelatin into any flavored liquid, pour in a wide pan, and freeze solid. Cut into chunks while frozen and let thaw in the refrigerator wrapped in a couple layers of cheese cloth over a bowl to catch the liquid. Takes a few days but it can't leave the 'frige. The liquid in the bowl is consomme, you can make it from any flavored liquid, such as ketchup. Even coffee, or bacon, or cheese.

The egg whites, or gelatin, filter out all of the stuff in a stock. A consomme is a stock that has been filtered to be very clear. It's the difference between a nice clear soup or a cloudy one. The egg whites float to the surface of the stock while it cooks and form a raft, and the convection action of the water forces the stock to flow through the matrix of proteins, which act as a filter, catching all the stuff that causes the stock to be colored. The gelatin method dose something similar, by pulling the solid material from the stock into the gelatin. The gelatin doesn't melt in the frige, but the stock does so it goes through the cheesecloth, that's why you can't remove it from the frige until it's all melted.
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Old 10-24-2011, 07:50 AM   #8
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Hi, No Mayo (love your avatar BTW)

Now I'm really confused. I took broth to mean the juice from boiling meat. I sometimes add the meat back in to make a soup, but usually, I cook the meat until the desired doneness, then remove it from the liquid. I keep the meat for use elsewhere, and add the bones back to continue making stock.

I try to return at least one 2 Cup container to the freezer.

I like to give my broth/stock as much chance as possible to get richer, more inhanced. I love to make beans from a yummy stock.

What do you use your stock for?
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Old 10-24-2011, 08:31 AM   #9
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Technically...

BROTH is made from simmering meat in water.

STOCK is made from simmering bones ( and usually meat or meat scraps).

It's as simple as that.

The difference us the use of bones. Bones make for stock's fuller, richer end product.

CONSOMME is clarified broth or stock. It's clarified using a "raft" of ground meat mixed with egg whites and sometimes chopped tomatoes. The raft attracts proteins and other impurities in the liquid and thus renders it clear. Egg is used as a binder to hold the raft together.
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Old 10-24-2011, 08:53 AM   #10
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Technically...

BROTH is made from simmering meat in water.

STOCK is made from simmering bones ( and usually meat or meat scraps).

It's as simple as that.

The difference us the use of bones. Bones make for stock's fuller, richer end product.

CONSOMME is clarified broth or stock. It's clarified using a "raft" of ground meat mixed with egg whites and sometimes chopped tomatoes. The raft attracts proteins and other impurities in the liquid and thus renders it clear. Egg is used as a binder to hold the raft together.
Exactly. This is the difference. Spot on!! Any other explanation is inaccurate supposition.
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