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Old 03-18-2015, 11:01 AM   #11
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...Keep in mind that there are regional differences that also determine what one calls things. For example, what you call a "hob" others call a "stove top". Which one is correct?
Not a valid parallel. Hob and Stove top both refer to the same thing. A hob doesn't have other definitions.

Consider looking at it this way. Someone serves you a bowl of bite sized meat and vegetables in a thick, hearty gravy. Do you look at it and say, "stew!" or do you have to ask how it's cooked first?
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:38 AM   #12
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This is my definition, provided we are talking about a dish containing bite size pieces of meat and/or vegetables in a sauce or gravy.

Keep in mind that there are regional differences that also determine what one calls things. For example, what you call a "hob" others call a "stove top". Which one is correct?

I generally braise stews, pot roast etc in the oven because it heats more evenly and avoids scorching
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:55 AM   #13
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Not a valid parallel. Hob and Stove top both refer to the same thing. A hob doesn't have other definitions.
It's exactly the same. My point is that what you may call a "casserole" someone else will call a "stew" depending on where they live.
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:56 AM   #14
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I generally braise stews, pot roast etc in the oven because it heats more evenly and avoids scorching
I also do that for the same reasons, plus I get much more accurate control over the temperature.
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:58 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I generally braise stews, pot roast etc in the oven because it heats more evenly and avoids scorching
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I also do that for the same reasons, plus I get much more accurate control over the temperature.

...but then they'd be casseroles, right?
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Old 03-18-2015, 12:49 PM   #16
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A casserole is cooked in an oven dish that would not be used on a burner.
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Old 03-18-2015, 01:16 PM   #17
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A casserole is cooked in an oven dish that would not be used on a burner.

What if I made a casserole in an oven dish then the dish broke and I had to use an oven-proof dutch oven to cook it?
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Old 03-18-2015, 01:18 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Not a valid parallel. Hob and Stove top both refer to the same thing. A hob doesn't have other definitions.

Consider looking at it this way. Someone serves you a bowl of bite sized meat and vegetables in a thick, hearty gravy. Do you look at it and say, "stew!" or do you have to ask how it's cooked first?
Actually "hob" does have at least one other definition although it's off topic. I was a journeyman machinist, and I ran gear cutting machines during my apprenticeship which cut gear teeth with a hob. They were called gear hobbers. This is a hob:



Quote:
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A casserole is cooked in an oven dish that would not be used on a burner.
Not necessarily. I have several Corningware dishes which can be used either way (I even have a detachable handle for one of them for stove top use), and I often make casseroles in them.
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Old 03-18-2015, 01:57 PM   #19
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Then, what do call something that is started on the stove top, can be finished there or in the oven, like jambalaya? I've also started "stews/pot roasts" on the stove top and finished in the oven.

A Casserew?
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Old 03-18-2015, 07:47 PM   #20
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So I posted on the Todays Menu thread that I had cooked Harvest Home Casserole but confusingly to me it was cooked on the hob and I generally regard casserole as being cooked in the oven.
This started a bit of a debate with some maintaining that the defining factor was the consistency of the dish while others maintained it was the cooking method that defined it.

Rather than clutter up the Todays menu thread I thought I'd ask the question here.

So, casserole = oven, stew = hob. Or casserole = thick consistency, stew = thinner consistency?
Or do you have another definition?
For us (i.e. in the UK) the two terms are interchangeable for a dish cooked long and slow, although some people would define stew as cooked on the hob and casserole as being cooked in the oven. Both are cooked long and slow in liquid (eg wine and/or stock), often using cheaper cuts of meat. "Casserole" tends to be "posher" than "stew" even when the contents and method are the same - "Stew" sounds more homely somehow and you'd probably call it a casserole when you served it to guests and a stew when you served it to the family.

I've never heard that the thickness of the sauce part of the dish made any difference to the definition of "casserole" or "stew".

I gather from discussions here on DC and on Food Network editions of "Barefoot Contessa" that the definitions are more complicated in the US. A casserole may be what we would call a "made-up dish" for example something concocted from left-overs or something (as Addie says) like macaroni cheese. I saw a demonstration on a Barefoot Contessa episode where she cooked what she called a chicken stew using cooked chicken (not, in that case, left-overs but chicken she had roasted specially to go into a stew). And there is "tuna casserole" which is made with a tin of tuna and a can of Campbell's soup as the main ingredients which made it's way over here sometime in the later 1950s or '60s.

When it comes down to it, "you pays your money and you takes your chance" as the saying goes.
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