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Old 03-18-2015, 07:52 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
A hot dish is one the includes a can of creamed soup, a starch (noodles), and ground beef or other type of protein (tuna). Started on the stove top, goes in the oven. That would be the MN-ND-WI definition.


A casserole is a one-pot dish where the ingredients are mixed together and then put in the oven.


A stew has a "gravy" of sorts, is thicker than a soup, and can be simmered on the stovetop, in the crockpot, or cooked in the oven at a lower temperature (low and slow) than a casserole, which is usually cooked at 350.
But the OP is in The UK and things are different here. If I was invited to share a casserole I would be expecting boeuf bouguignon, not mac 'n cheese
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Old 03-18-2015, 07:56 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
A casserole is cooked in an oven dish that would not be used on a burner.
But it could if it was of the Le Creuset type of enamelled cast iron
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:03 PM   #23
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And there again

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Old 03-18-2015, 08:08 PM   #24
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Casserole was originally the pan / dish. The term did not show up in and English language dictionary (I want to say Webster's) to mean the food inside of the pan until the 1950s. I think it was 1954, but it might have been 1958. I don't have time to search for the post in which I originally wrote that re: hotdish vs. casserole as terms and probably has links to the references on which I relied. I'm pretty sure it was probably a LeCreuset casserole dish (wink).
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:55 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I generally braise stews, pot roast etc in the oven because it heats more evenly and avoids scorching
The plus factor of having the stew on top of the stove is that you can add certain vegetables at a later time i.e. so that it does not overcook too much, for instance green veg.

You could also do this with a casserole but not too often else it would make the heat fluctuate too much, i.e. with constant removal from oven.

The benefit from a casserole (I find) is that it doesn't have to incorporate potatoes necessarily but these can be baked alongside it.
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:59 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
But it could if it was of the Le Creuset type of enamelled cast iron
Yes I was thinking the same thing.
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Old 03-19-2015, 10:41 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by creative View Post
The plus factor of having the stew on top of the stove is that you can add certain vegetables at a later time i.e. so that it does not overcook too much, for instance green veg.

Yes, but one can simply open the oven door and add short-cooking vegetables later.

For me, the benefit of even heat and no scorching means pretty much always braising in the oven.
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Old 03-19-2015, 01:27 PM   #28
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My Irish Stew is baked completely in the oven. No stove top at all, not even browning the stew meat, and yet I get wonderfully browned and flavorful meat. I use a Dutch oven without the lid.
To me, a casserole is baked in a shallow dish, is homogenous in texture and prominently features some sort of starch such as rice, potatoes, noodles, dumplings. But this is just my opinion.
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Old 03-19-2015, 01:44 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
My Irish Stew is baked completely in the oven. No stove top at all, not even browning the stew meat, and yet I get wonderfully browned and flavorful meat. I use a Dutch oven without the lid.
To me, a casserole is baked in a shallow dish, is homogenous in texture and prominently features some sort of starch such as rice, potatoes, noodles, dumplings. But this is just my opinion.
The problem with this discussion is that when you have an eclectic membership, the variety of what can be called "casseroles" is endless. I'd call a chicken pot pie a casserole. Others would call it a stew. I've seen stew's with potatoes and dumplings that made for a prominently featured starch, yet they are still stews - or sometimes not even stew, but soup.

Even the term "casserole" is relatively new for me. When I was growing up, they were always "hotdishes", and a casserole was the vehicle that a hotdish was baked in.

And then there's deep dish pizza... what the heck is that???
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Old 03-19-2015, 01:48 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
The problem with this discussion is that when you have an eclectic membership, the variety of what can be called "casseroles" is endless. I'd call a chicken pot pie a casserole. Others would call it a stew. I've seen stew's with potatoes and dumplings that made for a prominently featured starch, yet they are still stews - or sometimes not even stew, but soup.

Even the term "casserole" is relatively new for me. When I was growing up, they were always "hotdishes", and a casserole was the vehicle that a hotdish was baked in.

And then there's deep dish pizza... what the heck is that???
I'd call a chicken pot pie a pie.

"Hotdish" is a regional name for a casserole. Which is the name of both the vessel and its contents.
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