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Old 03-19-2015, 05:05 PM   #41
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I have a 13"x9" casserole dish. We use it for cakes, brownies, lasagna and casseroles/hotdishes. I wouldn't call the cakes, brownies or lasagna casseroles.
Hmm, my 9"x13" pans are still called cake pans, even though they are used more for hotdishes in our house (we try to keep the desserts to a minimum because we are both too maxi sized as it is).
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Old 03-19-2015, 05:05 PM   #42
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I have a 13"x9" casserole dish. We use it for cakes, brownies, lasagna and casseroles/hotdishes. I wouldn't call the cakes, brownies or lasagna casseroles.
Like most of us Andy, we do the same. The difference is you wouldn't use it on top of the stove. All of my casserole dishes are breakable and designed for only the oven. Sure, there's always the exception of cast iron or Corning Ware.
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Old 03-19-2015, 06:19 PM   #43
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Not everything has to be a casserole or a stew.
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Old 03-19-2015, 08:45 PM   #44
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The problem with this discussion is that when you have an eclectic membership, the variety of what can be called "casseroles" is endless. I'd call a chicken pot pie a casserole. Others would call it a stew. I've seen stew's with potatoes and dumplings that made for a prominently featured starch, yet they are still stews - or sometimes not even stew, but soup.

Even the term "casserole" is relatively new for me. When I was growing up, they were always "hotdishes", and a casserole was the vehicle that a hotdish was baked in.

And then there's deep dish pizza... what the heck is that???
Just to put my 2 cents in..... I agree with RP's statement above....it's regional and semantics. When RP was growing up, they were called 'hotdishes' in the area he grew up in.....on the other hand, I had never heard that term until a few years ago when I started reading cooking forums. I grew up with the term 'casserole'. It's all the same, IMVHO.

To me, a casserole is multiple main dish ingredients baked in the oven in a 'casserole' vessel. It can be lasagna, mac and cheese, etc., and still be a casserole. It's just that lasagna and mac and cheese have names. We don't normally say 'lasagna casserole' or 'mac and cheese casserole', even though they're baked in a casserole dish.

For example, if I were to deconstruct a lasagna and use egg noodles instead of lasagna noodles, and mix everything up together instead of layering it, then bake it in a casserole dish, I'd call it a pasta casserole. It wouldn't be lasagna anymore. I bake enchiladas in a casserole dish, and they are just enchiladas...

This has been a fun thread to read! I've enjoyed reading about our versions of casseroles and stews.
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Old 03-19-2015, 09:26 PM   #45
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Around here a lasagna casserole isn't the same thing as lasagna. It's made with layers of short pasta instead of lasagna noodles. It is usually layered exactly like lasagna.
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Old 03-19-2015, 09:54 PM   #46
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We could always get into "stove top casseroles".......

Shades of "Hamburger Helper'.......nahh I'm done.

For those across the pond...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger_Helper
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Old 03-20-2015, 02:23 AM   #47
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In the end, does it matter what it's called as long as it's called "delicious" when eaten? And, for the record, I've always made stews and pot roasts on the stove top and have never scorched a piece of food. YMMV.*

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I'd call a chicken pot pie a pie...
But can it rightfully be called a "pie" if there is no bottom crust?
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Old 03-20-2015, 03:49 AM   #48
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Goodness Cooking Godess, of course it's a pie with no bottom crust.

I've even made 'pies' where the crust wasn't a crust at all but was instead topped with several sheets of buttered, scrunched up filo pastry.

And us Brits also do a Steak and Kidney Pudding which is in fact a steamed pie.

Not that I wish to confuse matters..........


BBC - Food - Recipes : Steak and kidney pudding
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:01 AM   #49
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I'd call a chicken pot pie a pie.

"Hotdish" is a regional name for a casserole. Which is the name of both the vessel and its contents.
I'd call it a chicken pot pie a savoury pie. Regional = MN, WI, ND, maybe part of northern IA and maybe a corner of SD, depends on the ethnic background of the people who settled in the area. I don't recall that any of the vessels were called hotdishes, just the contents, when I lived in MN. There was also a cultural/social difference re: hotdish and casserole. A hotdish was s/thing you served to family but a casserole was s/thing you could serve to company because it had more expensive ingredients and was more "elegant." Wish I could afford to go back to university and get funding to research this and write a thesis on it! For example, that standby of noodles, cream of XX soup, peas, celery, a can of tuna, S&P is a hotdish, topped, of course, with crushed potato chips, cooked in the oven at around 350 for about 35-40 minutes and that is tuna hotdish. I don't know when we would've called it a casserole. But, when we would take wild rice, ham/shrimp/chicken, broccoli, cream of mushroom soup or a white sauce, add some mushrooms, celery, onion, frozen peas, put it all together and bake it in the oven for about 45 minutes at 350 in a dish that could be brought to the table, (and served to company or brought to a church supper or other potluck functions) that would be wild rice casserole. Note: no potato chips to make a crust.

A stew was something that had to cook low and slow, didn't include pasta (instead it would have potatoes, carrots, rutabaga, turnips--fall/winter veggies) or was made in the pressure cooker or started on the stove and finished in the oven. The meat (usually beef) came from the front of the animal--a bit tougher, needed the longer cooking time. FWIW--Kebab meat comes from the back end--not as muscular and can be cooked at higher temps and faster.
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Old 03-20-2015, 09:30 AM   #50
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...For example, that standby of noodles, cream of XX soup, peas, celery, a can of tuna, S&P is a hotdish, topped, of course, with crushed potato chips, cooked in the oven at around 350 for about 35-40 minutes and that is tuna hotdish. I don't know when we would've called it a casserole...
We call this "Tuna Noodle Casserole". Regional difference.
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