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Old 03-20-2015, 11:00 AM   #51
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There are so many one pan or pot hot dishes (not "hotdishes) that are cooked in such a mix of methods that taking a name and trying to nail it down to any range of food types is nearly impossible.

I think that it suffices to say that we generally know what we are talking about in 99% of the cases, whether or not we agree fully on the terminology.
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Old 03-20-2015, 11:03 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
For example, that standby of noodles, cream of XX soup, peas, celery, a can of tuna, S&P is a hotdish, topped, of course, with crushed potato chips, cooked in the oven at around 350 for about 35-40 minutes and that is tuna hotdish. .

Growing up in Minneapolis, my family called this a casserole, not a hotdish.

I also had never heard of the term "hotdish" until recently, despite living my childhood in Minnesota, North Dakota and Iowa.
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Old 03-20-2015, 11:14 AM   #53
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:07 AM   #54
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We call this "Tuna Noodle Casserole". Regional difference.
Call it what you like, in MN that is tuna hotdish. Or tuna hotdish casserole...MN tater tot hotdish casserole. I guess for those who didn't grow up knowing the difference between a hotdish and a casserole, the Internet now has to add "casserole" to a recipe for a hotdish.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:45 AM   #55
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Oh good grief!! WHY is it so important CWS?
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Old 03-22-2015, 04:07 AM   #56
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There are so many one pan or pot hot dishes (not "hotdishes) that are cooked in such a mix of methods that taking a name and trying to nail it down to any range of food types is nearly impossible.

I think that it suffices to say that we generally know what we are talking about in 99% of the cases, whether or not we agree fully on the terminology.
I oven cooked some dry rubbed chuck roast with vegetables in a covered casserole dish. It was like beef stew when I broke apart the meat and chunked up the vegetables.

Casserole stew.
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Old 03-22-2015, 08:02 AM   #57
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Oh good grief!! WHY is it so important CWS?
It isn't important, because words are one of my favorite things--instead of asking why the sky was blue, I was one of those children who wanted to know why grandma said K-nife instead of knife. I loved words with the letter 'q' (btw, in one of my linguistic courses, people shared the letter they fell in love with as a child--q, x, z, k, p, and w were the letters). It is one of those linguistic quirks that I find so very interesting because my MA is in linguistics and dialects were one of the areas I found fascinating to study. I love talking about words. I thought perhaps there were others who would find it fun.


The word is reflective of the immigrants who settled in the area. Where I come from, and where I now live, the word gravy isn't used for the sauce one puts on pasta. For those who live in areas settled by Italian immigrants, gravy is to them what sauce is to those of us living elsewhere and who grew up in communities made up of immigrants from other areas. Another one is bars vs. squares. In New England, there are a lot more verisions for chowder than you'd find in Nebraska. Not a lot variations for chili in MN, but head on down to TX! Church cookbooks and Jr. League cookbooks are a great source of these regional differences.

Language is reflective of culture and "hotdish" is reflective of the tradition of barn raisings, meals that could be stretched to feed a large family, neighbours stopping by if they haven't seen habitual activity at your house for three days (this happens when I'm in MN and my dad is out of town and not walking his dog--the neighbor usually comes by to find out if s/thing has happened to my dad because I'm the one walking the dog). Hotdish is a regional word reflective of the Scandinavian immigrants who settled in the areas mentioned. I just find it an interesting "food" word. Not important, just a regional linguistic anomaly. My grandmother's handwritten cookbook has hotdish recipes--pre-dates when casserole entered the English language in the '50s. She lived almost all of her life 18 miles south of the US-Canada border. In a region settled by Norwegians and Swedes.

You were born in MN, didn't you eat hotdishes before you moved to CA, Kayelle?
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Old 03-22-2015, 08:32 AM   #58
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I am like you CWS. I too love words. Living in a city of immigrants, I hear pronouncements of the English language and some times you can't even recognize the word they are trying to say. They bring with them the words for food that they used in their country. If I were to say a "sauce for pasta", they would look at me and not have one inkling of what I was referring to. I figure it is their food and if they want to call it gravy, then gravy it is. For those who live here in this region. If I moved to another part of the country, then it would become Pasta Sauce.
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Old 03-22-2015, 08:40 AM   #59
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Call it what you like, in MN that is tuna hotdish. Or tuna hotdish casserole...MN tater tot hotdish casserole. I guess for those who didn't grow up knowing the difference between a hotdish and a casserole, the Internet now has to add "casserole" to a recipe for a hotdish.
When I talked to my dad the other night, he was making tuna FISH hotdish for supper. Noodles, a can of tuna, a can of cream of xx soup (chicken/mushroom/celery--whatever was on sale), chopped celery, onion, frozen peas. Cook the noodles, sauté the celery and onion in a bit of butter and oil, mix the tuna, soup, frozen peas, onion and celery together. Add some milk or water or--gosh be adventuresome--the tuna "juice" if more liquid is needed. Dump everything in a Corning ware dish, sprinkle with crushed potato chips or saltine crackers, cook at 350 for about 25-30 minutes. Done. CWS' dad's Tuna FISH hotdish.
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Old 03-22-2015, 08:41 AM   #60
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I am like you CWS. I too love words. Living in a city of immigrants, I hear pronouncements of the English language and some times you can't even recognize the word they are trying to say. They bring with them the words for food that they used in their country. If I were to say a "sauce for pasta", they would look at me and not have one inkling of what I was referring to. I figure it is their food and if they want to call it gravy, then gravy it is. For those who live here in this region. If I moved to another part of the country, then it would become Pasta Sauce.
If tomato-based and it has ground beef in it, it would probably be called spaghetti sauce!
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