"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-21-2011, 01:26 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
What makes large bubbles in breads?

I watched a DDD show where a restaurant specializing in Italian sandwiches showed how to make their own sub bread. When they opened it up, I see a lot of big air bubbles similar to what you see in Ciabatas. I wonder what makes those big air bubbles? I tried many times to make bread but all of them have small uniform bubbles. What's the theory and science behind?

__________________

__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 01:30 PM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Usa
Posts: 191
leviners Like Baking powder and baking soda.

Which contain Sodium nitrate.

The also probably have a good mother dough some where on hand ( just shy of the camera too )
__________________

__________________
The OutDoor Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 01:49 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 397
baking soda and/or baking powder is used in some shortbreads - mostly in biscuit type products.
no clue where the sodium nitrate comes in, that's not in any of my leavening agents.

most breads use yeast as a leavening agent. the yeast eats sugars and poops/generates CO2; gluten development in the flour makes the dough elastic - creating 'balloons' of trapped CO2 gas.

there's certain some exceptions - but for the most part over-working the dough _especially_ after the last rise prior to baking (could be 2 or 3 rises...) "deflates" aka breaks the CO2 balloons.

bread at the basic is flour, water, yeast. salt is optional as is virtually everything else "in the purest sense"

the proportions and the technique play a huge role in how a loaf of flour+water+yeast turns out.
ciabata, for example, is a very 'wet' aka 'slack' dough - that is the % of water to the % of flour is 80%+.

again a generalization, but 'wetter' doughs aka 'higher hydration' typically develop bigger holes/bubbles. a dough you mix / knead for 20-30 minutes is not likely to develop big holes - the 'crumb' aka 'texture' of the bread will be much finer.
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 01:57 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Usa
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
baking soda and/or baking powder is used in some shortbreads - mostly in biscuit type products.
no clue where the sodium nitrate comes in, that's not in any of my leavening agents.

most breads use yeast as a leavening agent. the yeast eats sugars and poops/generates CO2; gluten development in the flour makes the dough elastic - creating 'balloons' of trapped CO2 gas.

there's certain some exceptions - but for the most part over-working the dough _especially_ after the last rise prior to baking (could be 2 or 3 rises...) "deflates" aka breaks the CO2 balloons.

bread at the basic is flour, water, yeast. salt is optional as is virtually everything else "in the purest sense"

the proportions and the technique play a huge role in how a loaf of flour+water+yeast turns out.
ciabata, for example, is a very 'wet' aka 'slack' dough - that is the % of water to the % of flour is 80%+.

again a generalization, but 'wetter' doughs aka 'higher hydration' typically develop bigger holes/bubbles. a dough you mix / knead for 20-30 minutes is not likely to develop big holes - the 'crumb' aka 'texture' of the bread will be much finer.
Does poofing time in the poofer effect bubbles too?
__________________
The OutDoor Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 02:00 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,639
Yeast, the amount of gluten in the flour you are using, the length of time you let your bread proof, and the amount of kneading you do between risings all contribute to the "crumb" of the finished loaf.

"Crumb" is a term to describe the texture of the inside of the bread.
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 02:07 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 19,105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Yeast, the amount of gluten in the flour you are using, the length of time you let your bread proof, and the amount of kneading you do between risings all contribute to the "crumb" of the finished loaf.

"Crumb" is a term to describe the texture of the inside of the bread.
How does crumb refer to bubbles?
Would saying a bread had a lot of crumb mean a lot of bubbles, or a lot of actual bread?
I knew crumb refered to the inside of bread, but have no idea what it is describing, unless the term is simply, this bread has a good crumb, meaning a lot of nice holes/cavities.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 02:33 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 397
bread crumb definition, see
Baking Glossary | The Fresh Loaf

I can't imagine 100% of all bakers world wide will agree with any one specific definition, but it's a start.

proofing time will indeed affect the end result - both "too much" and "too little" are problematic.

a time honored 'test' is the 'finger poke' - described by many other words/phrases as well.
again - _depending_ on the intended loaf type/technique ... you poke the proofing bread, the indent should spring back slightly, but not completely. if the 'poke hole' springs back and essentially disappears, it's not finished. if the 'poke hole' does not spring back at all, it's over-proofed.

and after the proofing questions, there's the "oven spring" issue.

I bake a lot of bread(s) and I'm constantly trying new recipes. here's the deal: it's rare when all the stars align and it all works "perfect" the first time. I'd say 80% of my attempts do not "look like the picture" first time. if it has good taste or some other characteristic I like, I keep at it. you'll frequently see recipe directions that are a bit fuzzy about qtys. well, after you make a recipe a couple times you figure out what more/less you need to make it look like the picture (g).
__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 02:40 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 19,105
The "pattern of holes".
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 02:53 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 8,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
I watched a DDD show where a restaurant specializing in Italian sandwiches showed how to make their own sub bread. When they opened it up, I see a lot of big air bubbles similar to what you see in Ciabatas. I wonder what makes those big air bubbles? I tried many times to make bread but all of them have small uniform bubbles. What's the theory and science behind?
And the answer is....Flatulent Yeast!

I'll give a better answer after work.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2011, 03:50 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,706
If you want bread with a good crust, big holes and GREAT flavor, try the New York Times Bread.

Recipe: No-Knead Bread - New York Times

No need to use the floured towel--that just makes a mess. Instead, transfer the bread to a well greased bowl for that step.
__________________

__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]