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Old 08-13-2010, 03:34 AM   #1
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What to coat skillet with?

I like to do a lot of high temperature cooking (sauteing, searing) and have always used margarine because it had a higher smoke point than butter with (IM numb palate's O) the same taste. After reading it up on it, I really can't use it anymore. But obviously when I saute with butter, it burns. EVOO and VOO also burns rather quickly.

What do you guys use for these applications? I'm thinking just a lower grade olive oil? Any suggestions?

Thanks

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Old 08-13-2010, 04:53 AM   #2
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I use a mixture of butter and oil. (I use extra virgin).
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Old 08-13-2010, 08:32 AM   #3
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canola oil has a higher smoke point and peanut a very high smoke point. Lard works really well too.
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Old 08-13-2010, 08:45 AM   #4
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A lower grade olive oil would be better than an extra virgin certainly. Peanut oil is a great oil for high heat applications. I generally use canola as i do not keep a million types of oil in my cabinet. I have extra virgin olive and I have canola. I use the olive oil for most things. I only use the canola when I need a neutral flavor or for very high heat.
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Old 08-13-2010, 03:41 PM   #5
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Here's a good article to check out:
EXCERPT:
..."The Right Fat - Butter or Oil?
It all has to do with smoking points. Butter (350F) will give your food the best taste and a wonderful golden crust but burns more easily. Oil (375 F - 450 F) produces a nice crust and will not burn as quickly, but also doesn’t leave as rich a flavor or color as butter alone. Most chefs will use different oils depending on what they are cooking.
If they are cooking a Mediterranean style dish, they may choose olive oil, but if they are preparing an Asian dish, sesame oil might be the better choice. You match the oil to the style of cooking but remember much of the flavor will be cooked off because of the high heat so you may just be better off using a generic oil like canola or safflower and add a little of the flavored oil at the end.

The Reluctant Gourmet uses a combination of the two. This way I get some of the flavor from the butter and a higher smoking point from the oil. What you cook and the amount you’re cooking will determine how butter and oil you use. For example, use about 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons of each for 2 or more chicken cutlets and 1/2 to 1 tablespoon of each for 2 or more fish fillets..."
Saute Pan - Choosing and Buying the Right Saute Pan
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Old 08-13-2010, 03:50 PM   #6
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I wouldn't use sesame oil for frying. Another good choice for high-temp cooking is grapeseed oil (I actually DO keep lots of different kinds of oils on hand!). The half/half option is always good if you want to extend your butter's smoking point. And extra virgin olive oil (I refuse to call it EVOO) is generally better finishing a dish. As previously posted, a good olive oil will suffice, extra virgin is a waste in this application, IMHO. If you do decide to splurge on several varieties of oil, keep in mind that they will spoil, so don't go overboard with huge containers.
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Old 08-13-2010, 04:16 PM   #7
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Good old basic corn oil works great. It has a high smoke point and is stable.
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Old 08-13-2010, 04:21 PM   #8
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lLately I've been using grape seed oil and it works great at high temps.
Check this out.....

Grapeseed is the new olive oil - Phil Lempert helps you find the healthiest, best and tastiest foods
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Old 08-13-2010, 07:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaux View Post
I wouldn't use sesame oil for frying. Another good choice for high-temp cooking is grapeseed oil (I actually DO keep lots of different kinds of oils on hand!). The half/half option is always good if you want to extend your butter's smoking point. And extra virgin olive oil (I refuse to call it EVOO) is generally better finishing a dish. As previously posted, a good olive oil will suffice, extra virgin is a waste in this application, IMHO. If you do decide to splurge on several varieties of oil, keep in mind that they will spoil, so don't go overboard with huge containers.
Can you elaborate on the shelf life?
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Old 08-13-2010, 11:30 PM   #10
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I'm no expert, but I have experienced having oils start to smell rancid--so I like to keep them in small amounts, and refrigerate some of the more perishable. When good olive oil goes bad (or, What is the shelf life of various pantry items?) - General Chowhounding Topics - Chowhound
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