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Old 11-01-2004, 10:36 AM   #11
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Here's a couple recipes I have.

The tamarind is to the tropics what lemons are to French cuisine. Tamarind are indigenous to certain tropical climates. Sweet, sour, and pungent, it is an excellent compliment to spicy foods. You can find tamarind paste canned in many Chinese grocery stores. If you are lucky enough to find the actual fruit (it looks like a pod of beans), peel the outer skin/shell off, and soak in hot water for 30 minutes. Strain out the seeds, reserving all the liquid. Reduce the liquid until it has achieved a syrupy thickness. Chill and store this paste.


Tangerine Tamarind Sauce
Yields: about 1 ½ c

1 c white vinegar
½ c water
peels of 3 tangerines
1 T minced fresh gingerroot
juice of 10 tangerines
1 T tamarind paste

In a saucepan, bring the vinegar and sugar to a boil. Add the tangerine peels and ginger, and simmer until the liquid is reduced by a half, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, strain the liquid into a bowl, and discard the peels and ginger. Return the liquid to the saucepan, add the tangerine juice and the tamarind paste, bring to a simmer, and reduce by a half to a third, about 20 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat and allow it to cool to room temperature. Keeps for up to 2 weeks.

Stir-fried Shrimp with Tamarind
Yields: 4 - 6 servings

6 dried red chiles
2 T vegetable oil
2 T chopped onion
2 T palm sugar
-or- 2 T light brown sugar
2 T chicken stock or water
1 T fish sauce
6 T tamarind juice, made by mixing tamarind paste with warm water
1# shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 T fried chopped garlic
2 T fried sliced shallots
2 green onions, chopped

Heat a wok or large skillet, but do not add any oil at this stage. Add the dried chiles and toast them by pressing them against the surface of the wok or pan with a spatula, turning them occasionally. Do not let them burn. Set them aside to cool slightly. Add the oil to the wok or pan and reheat. Add the chopped onion and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 2 - 3 minutes, until softened and golden brown. Add the sugar, stock or water, fish sauce, toasted chiles, and the tamarind juice, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat slightly. Add the shrimp, garlic, and shallots. Toss over the heat for 3 - 4 minutes, until the shrimp are cooked. Garnish with the green onions and serve.
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Old 11-01-2004, 12:36 PM   #12
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Hi GB, sorry did not see this post earlier, have been busy cooking for a large crowd over the weekend and actually had just made the tamarind chutney

A lot of good advice by most folks.

My absolute favorite use of tamarind is a sweet chutney that goes well with just about anything. In Indian cuisine we use this as a dipping sauce and we also use it as a condiment (a tbsp of this)to a lot of other dishes we cook like cumin chickpeas (Sarah has posted a recipe for that within the Appertizer section) and Chaats.

Soak your block of tamarind in hot water.
Leave it for about an hour.
Now using your hands squeeze out the pulp from the pods.
Squeeze out as much juice as you can
Discard the pods (some strings will be left but that' alright)
Now strain the remaining tamarind liquid through a fine seive into a saucepan.
Next get a medium size bottle of applesauce (that's the secret ingredient)
Pour that into the saucepan
Add about 2.5 cups of sugar (taste along before you add all of it. I like my sauce on the sweeter side if you don't cut the sugar amount)
Add a tsp of salt
A tsp of freshly roasted and ground cumin
A tsp of cayenne
Let it cook for about 20 minutes on low until it's nice and bubbly
Let it cool completely and then pour into a glass bottle and store in the refrigerator.

Tamarind can also be used to enhance flavor of coconut based curry dishes. Most of the Thai and South Indian curry preparation use tamarind. I also use it as a flavor enhancer in vegetarian dishes (namely a stuffed baby eggplant dish that is very typical of Southern India).
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Old 11-01-2004, 02:30 PM   #13
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Thank you everyone for all your suggestions. Now I have so many options :)

Yakuta that chutney sounds fantastic. I will be trying that real soon. one question, how long will that last in the fridge? Thanks so much!
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Old 11-01-2004, 04:29 PM   #14
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GB

Yep pad thai is supposed to have tamarind in it. Often you'll see ketchup subbed for it. I made it friday night. Softened a chunk in hot water, whirled in FP and strained. that worked ok. Used palm sugar too, which is better than brwon sugar.

You can also make some difft. curries and chicken/pork/shrimp dishes with it, as well as tom yum soup.

Here's a link: http://www.google.com/search?q=tamar...art=0&sa=N

Hit the 88 market when in Boston to find this stuff.
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Old 11-01-2004, 04:33 PM   #15
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Thanks Jenny. Yeah some of the recipes I saw did use ketchup. I found my tamarind in Duck Soup in Sudbury. If you haven't been there, it is a cool little kitchen store that has some good stuff, plus there is a good sushi restaurant and a good Thai place right in the same complex.
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Old 11-01-2004, 05:03 PM   #16
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I am an adult but I have been know to play practical jokes with tamarind pods, which are brown and look exactly like dog turds from a distance .... :oops: :oops: 8) 8)
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Old 11-01-2004, 05:12 PM   #17
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GB the chutney will last for month or more months easily in the refrigerator. It also freezes beautifully and you can thaw it in the refrigerator and it's ready in no time.

I also wanted to make one more comment on Tamarind. Tamarind is also very popular in Mexico. I love to savor candies called Pulparindo which are made from tamarind and can be found in any hispanic market. If you ever get a chance try them. Once you try one you will be hooked on them forever. There are two kinds one red which are a bit on the hot side and another yellow which are more on the sweet side. Both are great.
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Old 11-01-2004, 06:07 PM   #18
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Awesome! Thanks Yakuta :)
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Old 11-03-2004, 05:29 PM   #19
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Quote:
“I have a block of tamarind sitting in my cabinet….”
GB, et. al. Although I am somewhat interested in buying tamarind from one of the ethnic markets in the city, there is a cautionary advisory worth reading in this document issued by the FDA: http://www.fda.gov/ora/fiars/ora_import_ia2107.html

Zeera Pani
(Cummin & Tamarind Water)

According to Charmaine Soloman, “cummin is reputed to be a digestive, and this refreshingly sour drink is served as an appetizer, much as tomato juice is in other countries. It is also served with festive – and therefore very rich – meals. Serve it chilled, with crushed ice, a sprig of mint and slice of lemon to garnish.” (The Complete Asian Cookbook, p. 102)

½ cup dried tamarind pulp
2 cups hot water
3 tsp finely grated fresh ginger
2 tsp ground cummin
pinch chilli powder, optional
½ tsp garam marsala
3 tsp sugar, or to taste
salt to taste
iced water & crushed ice for serving
mint sprigs, lemon slices to garnish

Soak tamarind pulp in the hot water and leave for 2 hours or overnight. Squeeze to dissolve the pulp and separate the seeds. Strain though nylon sieve. Add remaining ingredients, stir well, then strain again through very fine sieve or muslin. Chill. Dilute with iced water at serving time, add ice, and garnish.

Here’s Ms. Solomon's Imli Chatni (Tamarind Chutney), another recipe which calls not for tamarind juice, but the dried pulp you have on hand:

3 Tbsp dried tamarind pulp
1 cup hot water
1 tsp salt
2 tsp black or brown sugar
1 tsp ground cummin
½ tsp ground fennel
2 tsp finely grated fresh ginger
lemon juice to taste
pinch chilli powder, optional

Put tamarind in bowl with hot water and allow to soak until water is cool. Knead & squeeze pulp away from the seeds until it is dissolved in the water, then strain through a fine nylon sieve, pushing all the pulp through. If necessary, add a little more water to assist in getting all the pulp from the seeds. Add salt, sugar & other ingredients to the tamarind and stir to mix well. Taste and add more salt if necessary, lemon juice to sharpen the flavour and if liked, a small pinch of chilli powder.
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Old 11-04-2004, 12:18 PM   #20
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The advisory makes me feel a lot better about buying tamarind at the 88, actually. They are refusing entry to the US of any product not on the pre-approved list. I might make a copy of the list and take it next time I buy some.
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