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Old 10-29-2004, 03:00 PM   #1
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What to do with tamarind

I have a block of tamarind sitting in my cabinet, but I am clueless as to what to use it for. Anyone have any suggestions? Yakuta I am looking at you

Thanks :):):)

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Old 10-29-2004, 03:43 PM   #2
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i'm pretty sure it is an ingredient in tom yum kah or tom yum gai (thai soup with shrimp or chicken).
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Old 10-29-2004, 04:08 PM   #3
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Pad Thai is one of the more popular tamarind based dishes.
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Old 10-29-2004, 04:11 PM   #4
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I have made Pad Thai before, but have never seen a recipe that included tamarind. I guess you really do learn something new every day.
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Old 10-29-2004, 04:41 PM   #5
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Make steak sauce with it.

I'm guessing ketchup, tamarind puree, and some hot sauce would be delicious.
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Old 10-29-2004, 04:53 PM   #6
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Psiguyy, would I mix the pulp right in or would I soak it in water and strain and then use that liquid?
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Old 10-29-2004, 09:57 PM   #7
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GB:

Following is Ming Tsai's recipe for Pad Thai. We like it and make it often. More or less rice vinegar makes a big difference in the taste.


PAD THAI


3 Tb Tamarind Paste
3/4 C Boiling Water
4 Tb Fish Sauce
1 1/2 Tb Rice Vinegar
4 Tb Sugar
3/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper
4 Tb Oil
8 Oz Dried Rice Stick Noodles
2 Eggs
1/4 tsp Salt
12 Oz Shrimp, (31/35 count)
1 tsp Garlic, minced
3 Tb Shallot, minced
2 Tb Dried Shrimp, chopped (optional)
2 Tb Thai Salted Preserved Radish, chopped (optional)
6 Tb Roasted Unsalted Peanuts
6 Oz Bean Sprouts
5 Scallions, green only, sliced


Rehydrate the tamarind paste for 10 minutes then push it through a fine seive.

Add the fish sauce, vinegar, sugar, cayenne, and 2 Tb of oil to the tamarind & set aside.

Cover the noodles with hot tap water in a large bowl; soak until softened, pliable, and limp but not fully tender, about 20 minutes. Drain the noodles and set aside.

Beat the eggs and 1/8 teaspoon of the salt in a small bowl; set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a 12-inch skillet over high heat until just beginning to smoke. Add the shrimp and sprinkle with the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt; cook, tossing occasionally, until the shrimp are opaque and browned about the edges, about 3 minutes. Transfer the shrimp to a plate and set aside.

Add the remaining oil to the skillet; add the garlic and shallot, set the skillet over medium heat, and cook, stirring constantly, until light golden brown, about 1½ minutes;

Add the eggs and stir vigorously until scrambled and barely moist, about 20 seconds.

Add the noodles, dried shrimp and salted radish; toss with 2 wooden spoons to combine.

Pour the sauce over the noodles, increase the heat to high, and cook, tossing constantly, until the noodles are evenly coated.

Add ¼ cup peanuts, bean sprouts, all but ¼ cup scallions, and cooked shrimp to the noodles; continue to cook, tossing constantly, until the noodles are tender, about 2½ minutes.

Transfer the noodles to a serving platter, sprinkle with the remaining scallions, 2 tablespoons peanuts; serve immediately, passing lime wedges separately.
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Old 10-30-2004, 03:30 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Psiguyy, would I mix the pulp right in or would I soak it in water and strain and then use that liquid?
I'd soften the pulp in a little hot water, take out seeds, if any, then puree and mix in with the ketchup.

In case you didn't know it, tamarind is one of the main ingredients in Worchestershire Sauce.
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Old 10-31-2004, 08:23 AM   #9
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[quote="Psiguyy"]
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
In case you didn't know it, tamarind is one of the main ingredients in Worchestershire Sauce.
No I had no idea about that. Very interesting indeed!

And Andy, thanks for that recipe. I have made Pad Thai a few times with a few different recipes (none with tamarind) and while they all tasted good, none of them tasted anything like Pad Thai. It is one of my wifes favorite dishes so I am looking forward to getting it right for her :)
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Old 11-01-2004, 09:26 AM   #10
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From Kate's Global Kitchen:

In some countries, the pulp is turned into syrup. By adding sugar and water, or carbonated water, it makes refreshing drinks. In Thailand the pulp is dusted with sugar and eaten as a candy. Vietnamese New Year's Candy, mut me, is a chewy bit of preserved tamarind pulp rolled in sugar and salt.


I've seen these balls of candy in the Latin food stores.
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