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Old 01-20-2010, 06:16 PM   #1
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Unhappy Which wine?

when cooking with white wine which type is usually used?

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Old 01-20-2010, 06:19 PM   #2
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Look for a dry white that has little or no oakiness. Sauvignon blanc or pinot grigio are good choices. Non-oaky chardonnay is also good.

If you don't drink white wine, buy a bottle of dry white vermouth and use that. It will last forever without deterioration. That's not the case with the others.
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Old 01-20-2010, 08:39 PM   #3
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You might also consider a full dry Riesling. Some of the dry ones made in the NW have nice notes and are really lovely. One more benefit - they are easy on the wallet.
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Old 01-26-2010, 05:41 AM   #4
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A good rule of thumb is to cook with the same wine you will be serving.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:11 AM   #5
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Julia Child recommended using dry white Vermouth when white wine is called for. She cited two main reasons: 1) Vermouth keeps for a much longer time than wine (even unrefrigerated!); and 2) it contains 13 herbs and spices, that can't help but enhance whatever it goes into.

I have to admit to following her lead most of the time. Vermouth is also significantly less expensive than most drinkable wines, and comes in 1.5 liter bottles, so I always have some on hand.
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:16 PM   #6
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Hmm.. ok, I defer to Julia :)
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:22 PM   #7
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Learned something here. Thanks Julia and June.
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Julia Child recommended using dry white Vermouth when white wine is called for. She cited two main reasons: 1) Vermouth keeps for a much longer time than wine (even unrefrigerated!); and 2) it contains 13 herbs and spices, that can't help but enhance whatever it goes into.

I have to admit to following her lead most of the time. Vermouth is also significantly less expensive than most drinkable wines, and comes in 1.5 liter bottles, so I always have some on hand.
I have no doubt that you're right, but to my taste and experience, I've found every vermouth I've tried to be bitter to some degree. (Maybe it's the 11 herbs and spices - Oh, wait, that's KFC! - sorry!)

But I do patronize a local Missouri (St. James Winery) and they have been very helpful in guiding me to the selection of a wine I need for a special purpose or meal. I've been blessed in that they have a selection of International Award Winning wines, but even if they hadn't, I'd still support them with my business because of having access to greater wine knowledge than I have (that isn't hard! ) and I like the idea of supporting a local business.

I only have one Julia Childs story, but it supports this same idea.

My father's best friend and his wife live in Ventura, Calif., and she and her daughter are chocolatiers. Their store was the sole source for Julia's chocolate candies while she lived in Santa Barbara until her death, and she maintained a standing order with them for bi-monthly deliveries. When interviewed by some magazine, Julia was asked why she bought only these particular candies, and she answered, "Because, like my fruits and vegetables, I like my candy fresh!"

I've always liked that answer.
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Old 01-27-2010, 10:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I have no doubt that you're right, but to my taste and experience, I've found every vermouth I've tried to be bitter to some degree. (Maybe it's the 11 herbs and spices - Oh, wait, that's KFC! - sorry!)
I don't think you'll find the food you use vermouth in to come out bitter, though.

Quote:
I only have one Julia Childs story, but it supports this same idea.

My father's best friend and his wife live in Ventura, Calif., and she and her daughter are chocolatiers. Their store was the sole source for Julia's chocolate candies while she lived in Santa Barbara until her death, and she maintained a standing order with them for bi-monthly deliveries. When interviewed by some magazine, Julia was asked why she bought only these particular candies, and she answered, "Because, like my fruits and vegetables, I like my candy fresh!"

I've always liked that answer.
sounds just like her!
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Old 01-27-2010, 11:41 AM   #10
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No don't use vermout. If a recepy calls for wine, if you use a spiced spirit it would change what you are getting.
In tuscany we use, depending on what we are aiming, primarily red wine, full body, and never a cheap wine. This for brasato and bolognese. If white meat, then we would use a white sweet wine like Vinsanto (cherry would be fine).
We know a chef using Brunello for cooking red meat.
White wine we are not using that much, if we do, still with white meat.
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