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Old 05-06-2010, 11:25 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
I never have that problem because I simply don't cater to picky eaters. If you're dining at my house & don't like what's being served, then you simply don't eat. Period.

...But people who won't eat something without ever having tried it, or who'll never try new things, or who base whether or not they'll eat something by its appearance? They're out of luck at my table.
I disagree.

If I've invited guests into my home, I see it as my obligation as host to provide a meal all will enjoy. Why would you invite someone into your home then give them food they don't like?

If you don't want to deal with that, you shouldn't invite them.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:28 AM   #12
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I think that a lot of times the name is enough to keep people from trying new things. Mahi mahi is good eating, dolphin fish not so much. My stepson loved calimari until he learned that is was squid. Pack heart, lung, kidneys, and other variety meats in an intestine, call it a hot dog, and kids love it. Try getting them to try any ingredient individually, probably not.

I agree with Breezy, while I will try to accommodate guest's palates, I don't make a big deal of it. You eat it or you don't.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:34 AM   #13
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The wheel turns both ways Andy.

If someone is such a picky eater that they rudely go "ewwww - I don't eat that" or push food around a plate when faced with mushrooms,onions,seafood/whatever as a guest in someone's home, then they 1) shouldn't accept invitations in the first place, 2) should suck it up & eat it, or 3) make sure the host knows in advance what they won't eat - & it better not require a full sheet of paper!!

And like I said (which you removed from my quote) - this doesn't pertain to food preferences/allergies/ethics. But if you haven't made known to me your preferences (as in dislikes), allergies, or ethics (vegetarian/vegan), then you have absolutely no business making faces or getting huffy or insulting over what you're being served, & I certainly am not going to cater to you.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:41 AM   #14
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I disagree.

If I've invited guests into my home, I see it as my obligation as host to provide a meal all will enjoy. Why would you invite someone into your home then give them food they don't like?

If you don't want to deal with that, you shouldn't invite them.
Elaborating a little, with a guest list of 8 or 10, if I know that one or more has preferences other than the meal I am preparing, I will generally serves two entrees. It is near impossible to accommodate everyone. A buffet works well for large groups, but I have had sit downs for thirty or more. In these cases, multiple dishes are served.

However, if I was cooking for someone who would eat only red meat, I would have a problem.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:46 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Elaborating a little, with a guest list of 8 or 10, if I know that one or more has preferences other than the meal I am preparing, I will generally serves two entrees...

I agree. That's one of the ways you manage the situation.

When we have an open house, I always plan several vegetarian foods for neighbors who don't eat meat.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:48 AM   #16
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I see both sides here. I always try to make things I know my guests will enjoy. I ask beforehand if there are things I should avoid so that there are no surprises when we sit down to eat. Having said that though, there have been moments when despite my best efforts someone sits down and refuses to eat what they are served. I've been fortunate enough to have had it be folks with manners and they just quietly pick out whatever they don't like. I've been to meals where someone rudely gags and comments about whatever it is they don't like. I find that embarrassing and offensive.

I don't like people to leave the table hungry, but if you don't TELL me what you don't like, then you are playing roulette.

When I'm serving picky people I always make sure I have a LOT of chips and dip out for them to fill up on. Strangely, I've never had anyone NOT eat chips and dip.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:54 AM   #17
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...And like I said (which you removed from my quote) - this doesn't pertain to food preferences/allergies/ethics...
I didn't address this as I put it into a different category as you do.

Ethical, religious and medical situations are accommodated.
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Old 05-06-2010, 12:20 PM   #18
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Here is something to think about. When I'm invited to a gathering/meal, I know it is not to leave w/my belly as full as I can get it. It is to visit, see people, catch up, share, it's not for nourishment or for a free meal. Most people can be happy w/just a little bit(if there is nothing they really like). I see it as being rude to disapprove of a meal GIVEN to you. It is more polite to eat respectively as it is a gift that they put alot of love and work into.

Maybe I'm get'n off topic.
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Old 05-06-2010, 01:54 PM   #19
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I feel blessed that there's no one in my life who's picky about what they eat. My fiance and I both have small lists of things that we can't eat...but what can you do about allergies? Heck, I'll even eat things I'm allergic to and suffer the consequences if I suspect the meal is worth it.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:09 PM   #20
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My mother. She believes that good plain food is the way to go always, and objects to any adventure.

My daughter eats almost everything, but she can be hard to keep up with, because she gets so easily bored. I need to provide regular variety.
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