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Old 08-31-2008, 06:40 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
The cooking sprays that come in a can (all of them that I am familar with) are not pure oil - they are a blend of oils and include added lecithin - which gives the spray it's non-stick quality ... BUT can cause the pan to develop a sticky residue if too much is used and ESPECIALLY if sprayed on non-stick cookware. The problem is that the lecithin is a chemical cousin of non-stick coatings - it forms a chemical bond which causes it to form an incomplete polymer (like not properly seasoning cast iron to fully polymerize the oil - leaving a sticky residue) - it has nothing to do with the propellant used as far as I know.

Now, I will admit that I have not read the labels of every iteration of every brand of cooking spray on the market. But the ones I have read seem to all agree on the "do not use on non-stick cookware" idea.

I can't use canned non-stick sprays indoors because I have asthma - it has nothing to do with the propellant - it has to do with the amount of fine particulate matter (mist) in the air. I have no problems if I go outdoors to spray it as long as the wind is at my back. I have a similar problem using a spritzer bottle to spray pure oil - just not as much of a problem because the mist is not as fine and does not linger in the air as long.

Personally - I find that if I pour a little oil into my pot/pan and wipe it around with a folded up paper towel I achieve the same results - I wind up with a small amount of oil coating the surface without it being aerosolized - and thus no over-spray that I have to wipe up off of the stovetop or a counter top.

Now - back to momerlyn's post ... I had never seen that either, but in some ways it might make sense. The heat will break down the surface tension in the small spray particles - allowing them to spread out and provide a better more uniform coverage of the pan surface.
Now I know how my daughter ruined my non-stick All-Clad frying pan. Thanks for that info.
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Old 09-05-2008, 02:23 PM   #12
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Some motocrossers use Pam under their fenders so the mud doesn't build up during a race. I usually use WD-40, but in a pinch I'll grab the Pam. That's all I really use it for since I don't bake. LOL
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Old 09-05-2008, 04:43 PM   #13
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Just read the direction on my can of Pam, spray on cold surface, no mention that it had to be heated first. What you are saying about heating a pan after spraying, but are you going to preheat a casserole dish before you assemble lets say, your lasagna?
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Old 09-05-2008, 04:59 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Some motocrossers use Pam under their fenders so the mud doesn't build up during a race. I usually use WD-40, but in a pinch I'll grab the Pam. That's all I really use it for since I don't bake. LOL
also works with paper shredders. spray a piece of paper with Pam and run it thru the shredder to lubricate the prickly parts.

returning now to your regularly scheduled post............
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Old 09-22-2008, 02:39 PM   #15
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cooking sprays

I don't like cooking sprays because they contain questionable ingredients. You could buy a mister and put your own quality oil in it.
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Old 10-20-2008, 05:27 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
The cooking sprays that come in a can (all of them that I am familar with) are not pure oil - they are a blend of oils and include added lecithin - which gives the spray it's non-stick quality ... BUT can cause the pan to develop a sticky residue if too much is used and ESPECIALLY if sprayed on non-stick cookware. The problem is that the lecithin is a chemical cousin of non-stick coatings - it forms a chemical bond which causes it to form an incomplete polymer (like not properly seasoning cast iron to fully polymerize the oil - leaving a sticky residue) - it has nothing to do with the propellant used as far as I know.

Now, I will admit that I have not read the labels of every iteration of every brand of cooking spray on the market. But the ones I have read seem to all agree on the "do not use on non-stick cookware" idea.

I can't use canned non-stick sprays indoors because I have asthma - it has nothing to do with the propellant - it has to do with the amount of fine particulate matter (mist) in the air. I have no problems if I go outdoors to spray it as long as the wind is at my back. I have a similar problem using a spritzer bottle to spray pure oil - just not as much of a problem because the mist is not as fine and does not linger in the air as long.

Personally - I find that if I pour a little oil into my pot/pan and wipe it around with a folded up paper towel I achieve the same results - I wind up with a small amount of oil coating the surface without it being aerosolized - and thus no over-spray that I have to wipe up off of the stovetop or a counter top.

Now - back to momerlyn's post ... I had never seen that either, but in some ways it might make sense. The heat will break down the surface tension in the small spray particles - allowing them to spread out and provide a better more uniform coverage of the pan surface.

Mm I didn't knew that
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Old 10-29-2008, 12:39 AM   #17
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Don't feel bad, Mommer, I only recently learned about heating a baking pan if I wanted something crisp. Should be a no-brainer, but I didn't know that.
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Old 10-29-2008, 03:37 PM   #18
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Wow! Thanks ever so much for the infomation. It's fun to learn; and thanks to Monerlyn for bringing this to our attention.
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Old 10-29-2008, 03:44 PM   #19
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I don't use cooking spray - ruins your pans eventually. spray bottle a good idea
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Old 10-29-2008, 05:53 PM   #20
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Live and learn, I had no idea there could possibly be any other way.
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