"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-08-2009, 06:40 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by miniman View Post
Another thing, I have been told is not to boil after adding the cheese- this can lead to splitting. In my recipe, you should take the sauce off the heat before adding the cheese.

Now Texasgirl is disproving the statement. All I can say is try the two methods and find one that works best for you.
Not disproving, I just told what I did, that's all.
I really think it depends on the kind of cheese and how much oil it has in it.
__________________

__________________
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 06:43 PM   #12
Cook
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Southern Alberta
Posts: 51
I am wondering if maybe I add too much cheese at once. Maybe melting a little at a time is the answer!!!
__________________

__________________
Marlene2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 06:46 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
jabbur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newport News, VA
Posts: 5,481
The softer the cheese, the better it will melt in a sauce. When I make a cheese sauce, I melt the butter, add a little flour and make a roux. then I add milk and cook it until it thickens. Lastly I add the cheese to melt. The key is to add the cheese with the sauce off the stove or on low. When the heat is too high, the cheese will "break" and clump. I like to add cream cheese to my sauces since it helps it come out creamier. I think everyone here has given you great advice and with a little practice, you'll get it.
__________________
I could give up chocolate but I'm no quitter!
jabbur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 07:02 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
I've also heard that you should add the mac when it's cooled down because the introduction of extreme heat or cold can change the texture of the sauce.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 08:32 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
First you make a white sauce, one of the first things my Grandma Snarr taught me to cook. She said that if I learned to make a good white sauce, I could make all kinds of other sauces and gravies.

Here's my usual recipe. Just remember the preportions are 1 tbl flour to 1 tbl butter to 1 cup milk, and you can make however little or much you want.

White sauce:

2 tablespoons butter or lipid of your choice
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups milk

Melt butter, stir in flour, remove from heat and gradually stir in milk. Heat heat on medium or medium high, stirring frequently, until mixture starts to bubble, then reduce heat to medium and stir constantly until sauce is thickened to your satisfaction.

If you are making cheese sauce, add one cup grated cheese just before the sauce is thick enough, remove from heat and stir until cheese is melted. If you want to make that two cups, you can, but if you want more than that, make more white sauce.

Season to taste...if using a powdered spice (like 1/4 tsp Coleman's dried mustard), mix it in with the flour so it will dissolve well. You will have no problem with granular spices.

This sauce doesn't take much to fix, except patience at the beginning.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 11:04 AM   #16
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,265
Constance has outlined a classic method for making bechemel sauce (white sauce) that she turns into mornay sauce (cheese sauce).

It's simple and foolproof. Once you get a handle on it you'll never make sauces any other way.

It's a great base sauce for all kinds of things -- mac and cheese, scalloped potatoes, broccoli with cheese sauce, etc.

ALWAYS make sure you add the cheese off the heat, like others have said. CHEESE HATES HEAT, it separates, gets grainy, curdles, etc.

If you have lumps in your sauce, just strain it before serving.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 11:22 AM   #17
Certified Cake Maniac
 
LPBeier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Great "Wet" North, Surrey, BC
Posts: 18,934
I prefer to make the sauce first, take it off the heat and add the grated cheese after. This has always worked for me, but never worked for my mother.
__________________
Living gluten/dairy/sugar/fat/caffiene-free and loving it!


http://beinglydia.com
LPBeier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 11:29 AM   #18
Certified Cake Maniac
 
LPBeier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Great "Wet" North, Surrey, BC
Posts: 18,934
Okay, I missed a whole page here. Jabbur, Constance and Jennyemma have much more eloquently stated what I do! I make a bechemel and turn it into a mornay! The only difference with my sauce is I add some nutmeg, thyme and peppercorns to my milk, which I heat seperately (just to scalding and then let infuse off heat for a few minutes) from the roux (flour and butter) and then stir the hot milk into cooled roux, cook, stirring, until thick, and then strain and add my cheese if I am making a cheese sauce.
__________________
Living gluten/dairy/sugar/fat/caffiene-free and loving it!


http://beinglydia.com
LPBeier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 08:56 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
I do what Constance does, but I cook the flour in the butter for a minute or two, which gets rid of any raw flour taste, then add the milk all at once and stir over medium-high heat until it starts to bubble and gets thick. Add the GRATED cheese at that point and stir until it's incorporated. I've never had a problem with it, and certainly no lumps of cheese (which is why I emphasize grated cheese).
__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 09:19 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Vanilla Bean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Washington State
Posts: 7,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
I do what Constance does, but I cook the flour in the butter for a minute or two, which gets rid of any raw flour taste, then add the milk all at once and stir over medium-high heat until it starts to bubble and gets thick. Add the GRATED cheese at that point and stir until it's incorporated. I've never had a problem with it, and certainly no lumps of cheese (which is why I emphasize grated cheese).
That's what I do and never had problems.
__________________

__________________
A little kindness goes a long way.
Vanilla Bean is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.