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Old 03-18-2008, 06:41 PM   #51
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Drama Queen:

Actually...I will try to give you some of the measurements, however...I usually never measure anything when I cook unless I am standardizing a recipe for my staff in the kitchen.

In the Coq Au Vin recipe I posted, I used 12 chicken thighs. This would serve six people. I used one bottle of dty red wine, about 4 cups of mushrooms, 8 shallots quartered and 4 cloves of garlic. The bacon that was added first was a julienne that would have been about one cup.

That's pretty much it!

Hope that helps.

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Old 03-30-2008, 05:42 PM   #52
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Why? Price does not have to be a reflection of quality. How do you know you would not want to drink a $3 bottle unless you tasted it? For all you know it could turn out to be delicious. Don't judge a book by its cover or better yet don't judge a bottle by its price tag.
Come on now, i didnt say all 3 dollar bottles are bad, i just said i wouldnt usually drink them. i have gotten some good 3 dollar bottles before and i have drank them, but 9 times out of 10 i wont. I was basically just emphasizing the point that you dont need to spend 20 dollars on a bottle of wine to cook with.

EDIT: Should have put "usually" instead of "really" in my original post, but the emphasis is the same, though.
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Old 03-31-2008, 12:53 AM   #53
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Nothing is more boring than plain chicken breasts---but I've put myself on a low sodium diet and believe me wine adds that zing that makes you not miss the salt------it's esp. good to use when I poach the breasts---I add onions and garlic and red wine---the flavor is incredible and the chicken is so tender (I poach skin side up) and then remove when eating--Mrs. Dash and fresh cracked pepper are the only other ingredients
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Old 03-31-2008, 08:28 AM   #54
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Marsala is excellent for cooking as is almost any spirit. Beers, wines, fortified wines, liquors, vodkas, scotches, gins, tequillas, bourbons.....can all be used to add flavor to sauces, desserts and cooked meat dishes.

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Old 03-31-2008, 11:32 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
Nothing is more boring than plain chicken breasts---but I've put myself on a low sodium diet and believe me wine adds that zing that makes you not miss the salt------it's esp. good to use when I poach the breasts---I add onions and garlic and red wine---the flavor is incredible and the chicken is so tender (I poach skin side up) and then remove when eating--Mrs. Dash and fresh cracked pepper are the only other ingredients
I hear ya. I make my chicken breasts by sprinkling with Mrs. Dash original (no salt) and sauteeing them quickly in 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Sprinkle with Tabasco or Frank's Hot Sauce and you have a great little meal. Only takes about 3 minutes to cook. And the flavor is superb!

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Old 03-31-2008, 12:30 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
Nothing is more boring than plain chicken breasts---but I've put myself on a low sodium diet and believe me wine adds that zing that makes you not miss the salt------it's esp. good to use when I poach the breasts---I add onions and garlic and red wine---the flavor is incredible and the chicken is so tender (I poach skin side up) and then remove when eating--Mrs. Dash and fresh cracked pepper are the only other ingredients
Wine has many different chemicals in it that affect flavor. One of those is potassium chloride, which is actually a kind of salt, and reacts on your tongue the same way the sodium chloride (table salt) does.

If a person is on a low-sodium diet, cooking with wine, and lemon juice, will help boost the flavor of food, while decrease the amount of sodium ingested.
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Old 03-31-2008, 05:12 PM   #57
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Why cook with wine?


"Some people see things that are and ask, Why? Some people dream of things that never were and ask, Why not?" -Robert F. Kennedy

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Old 03-31-2008, 07:50 PM   #58
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Hi All,

Cooking with wine? The truth is that many classic dishes in the French repetoire include the use of wine or fortified wines and liquers. For example, if one looked at the works od that great doyenne of cooking - Julia Child, you will find recipes using white wine, red wine, brandy, sherry, Noilly Prat, Champagne, beer, lager, cider, Calvados and Armagnac etc..

The reason for using any alcohol in any dish is predicated/based on 2 reasons. The first is the flavour which the alcohol gives to the dish and the second is that it is tradtional.

Consequently, regarding the choice - buy the best that YOU can afford and second, use the wine or alcohol appropriate, relevant and integral to the dish.

If you choose not to use an alcohol for whatever reason(s), my advice to you would be to contact this messageboard for advice for an alternative. For example, in a Carbonnade de Boeuf, it may be that you need to cook the onions really well and add a good dash or 2 or 3 of Worcestershire sauce to get that depth of flavour. What you need is the note of a bass not a tenor - you get this with the beer/ale/lager. However, in the absence of this you may need the Worcestershire sauce or a dash of Balsamic vinegar - red or white.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 03-31-2008, 07:58 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by DramaQueen View Post
I hear ya. I make my chicken breasts by sprinkling with Mrs. Dash original (no salt) and sauteeing them quickly in 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Sprinkle with Tabasco or Frank's Hot Sauce and you have a great little meal. Only takes about 3 minutes to cook. And the flavor is superb!
Thank the cooking gods divine that there is wine and Mrs. Dash!!!
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Old 04-01-2008, 01:29 PM   #60
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..

The reason for using any alcohol in any dish is predicated/based on 2 reasons. The first is the flavour which the alcohol gives to the dish and the second is that it is tradtional.

Actually the two reasons are that #1 alcohol dissolves flavor components that are not water or oil soluable -- thus releasing added flavor from your ingredients (tomatoes are a good example) and #2 for the flavor of the alcohol itself (eg, a hit of brandy in onion soup).
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