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Old 11-15-2012, 11:46 PM   #11
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You can refrigerate or freeze it and that may buy you some time. But then again, it may not. It's not completely predictable. I've had some yeast last past two years. I've had other yeast that's gone bad within a few months. Once you open it and it's exposed to air, it begins to degrade.

The best advice is found right on the container itself.

I dunno Steve. I have been buying the 2 pound brick at Costco and freezing for a long time, and I have yet to have a problem. The one I am working on now is at least a year old. Price at Costco is somewhere around 3 bucks, a substantial saving over those little packages.
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Old 11-15-2012, 11:56 PM   #12
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Whether it be the instant or the regular, I always proof my yeast first. And no salt until the dough is almost done being kneaded. I have beautiful rises. The first thing I do when I am going to make dough is put the oven light on. It heats up the oven to a perfect temp for an excellent rise. Then I start to gather my ingredients together.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:07 AM   #13
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I still proof mine too Addie, I've never been able to bring myself to adding instant yeast in with the flour, doesn't seem right to me. I also wait to add my salt until I've put in about half of the flour.

I have a "proof" function on my range, it works really great for rising bread, the fans cycle on and off and cut the rising time in half. If the oven is in use, I can just set the dough on the stovetop (flat top range) and the warmth from the oven warms the glass top.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:15 AM   #14
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I still proof mine too Addie, I've never been able to bring myself to adding instant yeast in with the flour, doesn't seem right to me. I also wait to add my salt until I've put in about half of the flour.

I have a "proof" function on my range, it works really great for rising bread, the fans cycle on and off and cut the rising time in half. If the oven is in use, I can just set the dough on the stovetop (flat top range) and the warmth from the oven warms the glass top.

I don't trust the instant yeast. I need to see those bubbles eating up the sugar feed and smell it. I am all for change. But there are somethings our grandmothers knew best about. And proofing the yeast is one of them.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:08 AM   #15
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I don't trust the instant yeast. I need to see those bubbles eating up the sugar feed and smell it. I am all for change. But there are somethings our grandmothers knew best about. And proofing the yeast is one of them.
Especially when I'm using old yeast!
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Old 11-16-2012, 10:15 AM   #16
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I dunno Steve. I have been buying the 2 pound brick at Costco and freezing for a long time, and I have yet to have a problem. The one I am working on now is at least a year old. Price at Costco is somewhere around 3 bucks, a substantial saving over those little packages.
Jim, I don't doubt that one bit. Most freeze-dried yeast will last one to two years if air contact is minimized.

Now I'm no professional baker (like bakechef), but I do make a lot of bread. What I've found is that yeast doesn't go bad all at once, but rather loses its potency over time. So whereas you may have only had to use 5 grams at one time, it now takes 10 or 15 grams to get the same result. It's kind of unpredictable that way. And I think that's what happened to the OP's jar of yeast.

I try to follow the manufacturer's recommendations on shelf life. When I open a jar of yeast, I write the date on the top with a sharpie. If it goes past the "use within" date, I toss it and buy another jar of fresh yeast. In the grand scheme of things it's pretty inexpensive stuff.
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:18 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Jim, I don't doubt that one bit. Most freeze-dried yeast will last one to two years if air contact is minimized.

Now I'm no professional baker (like bakechef), but I do make a lot of bread. What I've found is that yeast doesn't go bad all at once, but rather loses its potency over time. So whereas you may have only had to use 5 grams at one time, it now takes 10 or 15 grams to get the same result. It's kind of unpredictable that way. And I think that's what happened to the OP's jar of yeast.

I try to follow the manufacturer's recommendations on shelf life. When I open a jar of yeast, I write the date on the top with a sharpie. If it goes past the "use within" date, I toss it and buy another jar of fresh yeast. In the grand scheme of things it's pretty inexpensive stuff.
Excellent point.

It's like the folks who queue in a long line to gas up because the price went down $.05/litre. Even if one put 70 litres in their tank (~18.5 US gallons), one would save a whopping $3.50. Most people are putting far less. I don't see how it's worth the time and agro.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:43 PM   #18
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I, too, use the bricks of yeast. Each brick is one pound and I normally use from 2 to 3 pounds per year. I keep the yeast, once opened, in a glass canning jar with a tight-fitting lid in the freezer. The unopened bricks are stored in the freezer, too.

I've never had any problem with any of my yeast. Perhaps it's because I use it so quickly, there's no problem storing it beyond the expiration date.
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Old 11-16-2012, 07:14 PM   #19
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I go through a lot of yeast. I too buy it in bulk. I've never had yeast go bad...but, now that it has been pointed out, I think I'll put it in the freezer (provided there is room...).
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Old 11-17-2012, 11:18 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Whether it be the instant or the regular, I always proof my yeast first. And no salt until the dough is almost done being kneaded. I have beautiful rises. The first thing I do when I am going to make dough is put the oven light on. It heats up the oven to a perfect temp for an excellent rise. Then I start to gather my ingredients together.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I still proof mine too Addie, I've never been able to bring myself to adding instant yeast in with the flour, doesn't seem right to me. I also wait to add my salt until I've put in about half of the flour.

I have a "proof" function on my range, it works really great for rising bread, the fans cycle on and off and cut the rising time in half. If the oven is in use, I can just set the dough on the stovetop (flat top range) and the warmth from the oven warms the glass top.
Our range in Colorado had a proofing setting which worked like a charm. Down here on the island, finding a warm place for the rise isn't an issue.

I use instant yeast, but I still proof it unless I'm using the bread machine (I have a loaf of raisin bread in the machine as I write this).

I get excellent rises with my normal (non-machine) baking, and it doesn't seem to matter when the salt goes in. I've read comments by expert bakers stating both methods, so I no longer worry about it.
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