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Old 11-24-2017, 11:30 AM   #1
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Why you are using Standard or Metric?

That is a question I have been asking myself. Why would you, the cook , use one over the other?

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Old 11-24-2017, 12:01 PM   #2
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Depends......some online or even packaged recipes or instructions use ml's and grams, then I'll follow them.

And on my kitchen scale, depending on what I'm weighing or trying to divide, I'll use ounces or grams.

Also, if a foreign tourist (which I get a lot around here) asks for directions, I use meters and kilometers.
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Old 11-24-2017, 12:05 PM   #3
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I use avoirdupois and standard because that's what I've used my entire life. Metric is much easier in its base10 logic, but for some reason we've never adopted it.
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Old 11-24-2017, 12:13 PM   #4
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I am a fan of metric over pounds and ounces. Metric makes it so simple to cut recipes down or increase them. It just makes more sense all around.

I am also converting my recipes as I go from volume to weight measurements where appropriate.
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Old 11-24-2017, 01:18 PM   #5
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Because I have lived in Canada since 1985, I use metric. However, I only measure when I bake, and then I use baker's percentages, which are all weighed on a scale.
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Old 11-24-2017, 01:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
I use avoirdupois and standard because that's what I've used my entire life. Metric is much easier in its base10 logic, but for some reason we've never adopted it.
Very very interesting. I never thought standard was also called "avoirdupois". Which is French for "having weight", and the French created metric. All this is so confusing .
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Old 11-24-2017, 01:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I am a fan of metric over pounds and ounces. Metric makes it so simple to cut recipes down or increase them. It just makes more sense all around.

I am also converting my recipes as I go from volume to weight measurements where appropriate.
What a coincidence, that's exactly what I have been doing
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Old 11-24-2017, 02:01 PM   #8
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I've only used weighing for baking too--and it doesn't matter which system I use. The scale I have does both.

As an interesting note...in cheesemaking I use standard measurements. Some of the books and internet media use just one or the other. The Gavin Webber in Australia uses metric but he also includes standard to appeal to a larger audience. Believe me, if you are in the middle of a recipe and it calls for only one or the other, it's just annoying to have to look up all the conversions and many authors and teachers only use one or the other. (I know because I use recipes from all different authors in different countries.) Most American authors and teachers only use standard and it is off putting to those that have to make conversions in countries where they use metric.

So, in conclusion. I write my own recipes in standard but I'm not selling a cook book. If I was, I'd try to be inclusive of both methods.
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Old 11-24-2017, 02:22 PM   #9
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I mostly weigh in grams because that is how I was taught in school and it is just more accurate for baking. If a recipe is in cups sometimes I will convert to weight and sometimes I will use my metric measuring cups. I rarely use imperial.
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Old 11-24-2017, 02:50 PM   #10
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Easy math vs no math

Iíve found that standard measures are fine if youíre following a recipe and not adjusting it for servings. If youíre baking, either is okay, as long as youíre consistent and use a kitchen scale (my new best friend). If you do have to make adjustments, I find that metric math is just easier. There are 1,000 grams to a kilo. What could be easier?

That kind of leads me to a question. Different flours have different weights, and sometimes the SAME flour from different companies can weigh differently! Not a real problem if the dough recipe is in weight and not volume (unless youíre using a different brand flour from the one in the recipe...). Isnít there any standard conversion chart, at least for whole wheat, white AP, and bread flours? A difference of a few grams between different brands is acceptable.

Maybe Iíll make this a project, but Iíll have to start a GoFundMe account so I can pay for all the flour!
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