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Old 03-31-2016, 12:33 PM   #31
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But what would you drink with bear?:rofl
When Yogi and Smokey come to my house for dinner, they always bring the wine. In fact, yogi is pretty good at food/wine pairings because he is, after all, smarter than the average bear.
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Old 03-31-2016, 12:38 PM   #32
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Rick, I understand what you mean about the pinot noir. For me, the cheaper ones seem like they are watered down and the best are so pricy it's hard to justify the expense. When I do buy the better one's I get two bottles for a meal but it's for something special. Our everyday one is discounted to $8 a bottle and that's by the case.
Life's Too Short to Drink Cheap Wine - Cliff Hakim
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Old 03-31-2016, 12:45 PM   #33
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Sadly, where I live it is difficult to find a proper, independant, wine merchant who knows what he is selling and can advise the customer without prejudice.
I recommend laithwaites.co.uk. They have reviews of all the wines they carry from different sources and they buy their wines worldwide. You can order on line and have the wines delivered right to your door, and if you receive a wine you don't like, they will cheerfully refund the purchase price and that wine's portion of the shipping charges.
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Old 03-31-2016, 01:59 PM   #34
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Matching wine with food

One thing I learned when I was actively in the wine trade and got my DIWSA certificate in wine studies is that, if you are seriously pairing culinary dishes and wine, it isn't necessary to bring out the famous names, or the percieved 'right' dish for it to go with - in my view, it's far more about pairing a wine, whatever it may be, that sets off a given culinary dish so that you achieve 'nirvana', so to speak. There are many humble wines that and great dishes that do this, like, for example, a modest Barbera grown on the right side of the hill with a Brasato al Barolo (beef topside braised in red wine, Piedmont's most prestigious red wine).

Also, the age of the wine matters, and whether it's aged well or not so well, whether it's travelled well or not, and whether it's been properly cellared and finally properly prepared for serving with the chosen dish. If you meet all these 'must do's' then you will have a memorable meal whatever the price of the wine. You can pair a rough chianti with a plate of spaghetti and tomato sauce, or an unknown white wine with a simple plate of grilled fish, provided the wine is properly cellared and cared for.

Obviously, anybody putting out a top wine like the Burgundy 'Clos des Réas'
a top single vineyard Vosne Romanče would require not only careful handling but also a prestigious dish to accompany it - or merely local cheeses!

The main thing to consider about all these things is never to get 'precious' about wine, but to aim to get the very best both from the wine and the dish that accompanies it so that it's a very good experience at whatever level, be it modest, which in itself can be great, or great, which can be modest at the same time.

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Old 04-01-2016, 03:01 AM   #35
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Sadly, where I live it is difficult to find a proper, independant, wine merchant who knows what he is selling and can advise the customer without prejudice. I'm stuck with supermarkets which are fine if you know what you want - well, some are - but hopeless for the "newby" wine purchaser.
Do you mean that it never comes to your mind to buy wines from wine merchant?

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Old 04-01-2016, 03:05 AM   #36
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Rick, I understand what you mean about the pinot noir. For me, the cheaper ones seem like they are watered down and the best are so pricy it's hard to justify the expense. When I do buy the better one's I get two bottles for a meal but it's for something special. Our everyday one is discounted to $8 a bottle and that's by the case.
Unfortunately, the really good ones are never cheap
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Old 04-02-2016, 05:26 AM   #37
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The USA produces wines of astoundingly good standard. If I lived there I would definitely stick with US produced wines. Preparing a wine for a drinking as you all know better than I do is essential - don't chill a white too hard or too fast, and don't bring your reds to room temperature too fast, and remove the cork about two hours plus before drinking. To tell when it's ready, pour a little in your wine glass (not tumbler), swirl and then swirl again in the mouth. You should not notice too much difference in temperature. Experiment with blending different reds together and also different whites - the results can be astounding! Above everything else enjoy your wine and enjoy your menu - it's all about enjoyment not snobbery.

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Old 04-06-2016, 04:48 AM   #38
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Do you usually pair wine and food ? what is your favourite menu?
Hi there,

I always do during a family dinner with in-laws or an usual meal with my husband and son. The fact that we all enjoy wine passed on from generation to generation.

We've been living in Glasgow for many years and my grandfather hold a small vineyard in Bothwell during his life time, he died at 61 and the property is now for sale...we still have a tiny cellar but most of the bottles are no longer drinkable so I often went to Mitchell Street wine store to buy any bottles wich best matched with the menu. Our last pairing was a white Bordeaux (Chardonnay) with chicken, spring veg and creamy sauces; it was excellent. For easter, we had roast turkey with Belgian blonde ale, some people said that this beer is the equivalent of chardonnay, it has the same fruit flavors I admit
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Old 04-06-2016, 08:46 PM   #39
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I've eaten a bit of bear and always had a cabernet sauvignon, even cooked the bear roasts with it, but now any of the maritage or clarets would be fine.

I have wine over 30 years old and anything over 10 years I decant using a jelly bag strainer and let it breath. I've only had one that was iffy and one from Tunisia that was bad. Of course there is always a younger wine in reserve for times like that. BTW, the young wines from Tunsia were not bad but no way I'd go back there now.
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Old 04-06-2016, 09:17 PM   #40
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I will happily drink the wine, but I think I'll skip the bear roast. I'm sure it's lovely though.
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