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Old 02-21-2015, 10:08 PM   #31
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Cheryl, have you considered one of the Penzeys pepper mills? I keep looking at them every time I order, but then pass. I bought a Peugeot mill a number of years ago. Even though the adjustment feature looks like it should be efficient, I noticed after using it for only a year or two that the grinds ended up being awfully close to the same medium grind whether I had it set on course or fine. It wasn't a very expensive model, but it cost plenty enough - actually more than the 6" Penzeys is right now. As a bonus, it comes full of those delish Tellicherry peppercorns.
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Old 02-21-2015, 10:18 PM   #32
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Cheryl, have you considered one of the Penzeys pepper mills? I keep looking at them every time I order, but then pass. I bought a Peugeot mill a number of years ago. Even though the adjustment feature looks like it should be efficient, I noticed after using it for only a year or two that the grinds ended up being awfully close to the same medium grind whether I had it set on course or fine. It wasn't a very expensive model, but it cost plenty enough - actually more than the 6" Penzeys is right now. As a bonus, it comes full of those delish Tellicherry peppercorns.
Yes, I have! In fact, I think I'm going to go ahead with a Penzey's pepper mill rather than waiting until I go to the city again. I've browsed their catalog looking at them, and they stand behind their products, so I'm going to go ahead with that.

That's the problem I have now with the cheapo just-to-get-me-by pepper mill I just bought - no matter how I adjust it, it only wants to do a fine to medium grind. Sometimes I like a courser grind - like when I grill a steak.
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Old 02-22-2015, 05:24 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
Yes, I have! In fact, I think I'm going to go ahead with a Penzey's pepper mill rather than waiting until I go to the city again. I've browsed their catalog looking at them, and they stand behind their products, so I'm going to go ahead with that.

That's the problem I have now with the cheapo just-to-get-me-by pepper mill I just bought - no matter how I adjust it, it only wants to do a fine to medium grind. Sometimes I like a courser grind - like when I grill a steak.
One cannot do without a peppermill. A good grilled steak just doesn't taste right unless it is covered in course ground pepper.

I also have a matching mill to my pepper one for course sea salt. I can't remember when I last bought salt in a round box like Morton's.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:54 AM   #34
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One cannot do without a peppermill. A good grilled steak just doesn't taste right unless it is covered in course ground pepper.

I also have a matching mill to my pepper one for course sea salt. I can't remember when I last bought salt in a round box like Morton's.
All salt forms have their place in cooking and baking. Some perform better than others in certain uses. Regardless of form, they all have essentially the same chemical make up - sodium chloride is sodium chloride, regardless of the size of the crystals. For that matter, salt mined from the ground is still sea salt, just much older from seas that dried up. Sea salt is best used as a finishing salt, and is generally wasted money when used for general cooking. It takes twice as much kosher salt, and even more sea salt to equal the flavoring power of table salt.

This is from a site called The Kitchn:

Quote:
...the only differences between kosher salt and table salt (and really, between nearly every other sort of salt) lie in the shape and size of its crystals, not its chemical makeup. Kosher salt has large, rough crystals that take a long time to dissolve in the mouth. They crunch. A tablespoon of kosher salt will actually contain fewer salt crystals, by volume, than table salt, which has much smaller crystals.

There is no difference between kosher salt and rough "sea salt". Pretty much all salt has an identical chemistry. Some are smoked, or have trace elements of minerals that change their taste or color, but any differences between "kosher" and "sea" salt, provided the shapes of their crystals are the same, are purely in the labeling.
If a recipe calls for regular "table" salt, then that's what should be used or it won't have the same flavor as what the author intended. The smaller crystals dissolve faster and more thoroughly to impart more flavor throughout. I can't imagine using a coarse salt for baking unless it's specifically required in the recipe.

I have regular salt, kosher salt and sea salt all in my spice cupboard.
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Old 02-22-2015, 12:16 PM   #35
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All salt forms have their place in cooking and baking. Some perform better than others in certain uses. Regardless of form, they all have essentially the same chemical make up - sodium chloride is sodium chloride, regardless of the size of the crystals. For that matter, salt mined from the ground is still sea salt, just much older from seas that dried up. Sea salt is best used as a finishing salt, and is generally wasted money when used for general cooking. It takes twice as much kosher salt for a recipe, and even more sea salt to equal the flavoring power of table salt.

This is from a site called The Kitchn:



If a recipe calls for regular "table" salt, then that's what should be used or it won't have the same flavor as what the author intended. The smaller crystals dissolve faster and more thoroughly to impart more flavor throughout. I can't imagine using a coarse salt for baking unless it's specifically required in the recipe.

I have regular salt, kosher salt and sea salt all in my spice cupboard.
I have a small food processor. When I need table salt, I put a couple of tbs. in the small food processor, and that processes that salt 'till it is almost dust. I buy two kinds of sea salt. Course and fine. I have never liked kosher salt. I have always found it to have an off taste.
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Old 02-22-2015, 01:46 PM   #36
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I have a small food processor. When I need table salt, I put a couple of tbs. in the small food processor, and that processes that salt 'till it is almost dust. I buy two kinds of sea salt. Course and fine. I have never liked kosher salt. I have always found it to have an off taste.
Kosher salt is just salt that has been rolled into flat crystals instead of the natural cube shapes.. It's properly called "koshering salt" because it has its origins in preparing certain kosher meats, for removing surface blood by dessication. Otherwise it's no different from non iodized table salt. Most salts are actually kosher in respect to the food preparation requirements in the Torah.

Sea salt is the same stuff, only just with a different crystal form. Sea salts from different regions may vary slightly in the composition of the trace compounds (most of which have no effect on flavor), but they are otherwise just NaCl. In fact some of the additives that are put in table salt to keep it from clumping are the same compounds that are found naturally in sea salt.

Any actual difference in taste is mostly just in one's head. In a blind taste test, I doubt that you could tell the difference.
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Old 02-22-2015, 01:58 PM   #37
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Not all kosher salts are created equal. Diamond Crystal kosher salt has one ingredient, sodium chloride. That's pure salt. Other kosher salts and table salts contain additives that prevent clumping and/or add iodine. Sea salts are less pure. They contain other salts and whatever else from the sea water, which explains why some are pink or black or speckled.

Measuring the different salts is also different. Among table salt, Diamond Crystal and Mortons kosher salts there is a significant difference in crystal size so the amount of salt in a teaspoon varies. A teaspoon of table salt is equal to 1.5 teaspoons of Mortons and 2 teaspoons of Diamond Crystal. No telling with sea salts as their crystal sizes differ within a single jar.
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Old 02-22-2015, 04:16 PM   #38
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Growing up in Soviet Union, everything was a luxury, unreachable luxury. For example a tea spoon of ground black pepper was readily available at a black market, that is to say that it was not readily available in stores, for a mere 1 ruble. What do you say 1 ruble was worth? Well, a well paid plant manager was making about 300 rubles a month.

Anyway, I grew up basically with salt as the only seasoning. In the summer time there were dill and parsley. If one was lucky enough and visited Black Sea resort one could obtain some cilantro and even fresh bay leaves. And if one was rally like he/she would find hot red pepper. Needles to say I have very undeveloped palate for seasoning.

So my main to go seasonings are garlic salt, paprika and cayenne pepper.
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Old 02-22-2015, 04:33 PM   #39
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"Kosher salt" is either marketing ploy or simply a name. Because in reality it is not used in koshering meat. Imagine plant producing thousands of pounds of meat, using a small box of salt. As the matter of fact same kind of salt sold in Soviet Union was called cooking salt.
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Old 02-22-2015, 04:39 PM   #40
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I forgot to mention this as one of my favorites. It's the perfect blend of salt, chili and lime. It's just terrific all by itself on roasted chicken, and also on fresh fruits or just about anything.

I have never seen that. Sounds interesting.
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