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Old 03-23-2011, 02:35 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
You are welcome. To boot, the pears and dried plums are first stewed for 15 minutes and the stewing liquid is added to the flour and yeast to form the dough.
Please post your recipe. sounds delicious!
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Old 03-23-2011, 02:40 PM   #42
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I love using Kraft singles (I use the ones label sharp cheddar) for grilled cheese sandwiches.

I refer to them as wallet cheese... they come in their own wallet.
Thanks for the huge guffaw, Frank.

Jenny, Mr. Kraft (whom I had the good fortune to know) would be very disappointed to see what garbage his name is on.
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Old 03-23-2011, 03:55 PM   #43
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A pet peeve of mine came when the server (at Red Lobster), set down my lobster tail and proceeded to squeeze lemon juice all over it! I don't like lemon on my seafood, especially lobster.

Don't assume everyone uses lemon. Lots of people don't like it.
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Old 03-23-2011, 04:14 PM   #44
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Please post your recipe. sounds delicious!
Hutzelbrot (a sweet fruit bread) can be eaten plain or topped with cream cheese

250 g (8 oz.) coarsely chopped dried pears
125 g (4 oz.) coarsely chopped dried plums (pitted prunes)
250 g all purpose flour
2 tbs. yeast
100 g (3.5 oz.) granulated sugar
1/8 tsp. salt
125 g chopped dried figs
65 g (2.3 oz.) chopped candied lemon peel
65 g chopped candied orange peel
125 g sultanas
125 g black currants
125 g finely chopped almonds
75 g (2.5 oz.) chopped hazelnuts
1 teaspoon cinnamon
teaspoon ground aniseed
1/16 teaspoon ea. ground cloves & ground allspice
1 grated lemon peel
2 tablespoons kirshwasser or dry plum brandy

Stew pears and prunes for 15 minutes in 1 cup of lightly boiling water.
Pour off and reserve liquid.
Combine yeast, cup of cooled reserved liquid and 4 tablespoons of the 8 ounces of four and let rest for 20 minutes.
Incorporate the balance of the flour and then allow to rise for 30 minutes.
Mix an additional cup of the reserved liquid, the sugar, salt, and spices into the dough.
Work in the stewed fruits, and all of the other fruits, the nuts and kirshwasser.
If too stiff to work in all of the ingredients additional quantities of the reserved liquid can be added.
The result should be a fairly stiff but sticky dough.
Form a ball and allow to rise overnight in a warm location.
Preheat oven to 195 C (380 F)
Knead briefly and form dough into two or three loaves, each about 2” high.
Allow to rise on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet for about 45 minutes.
Bake for 30 to 40 minutes.

In addition to eating plain or with a schmeer of Philly Creamcheese, it's a nice accompaniment to Manchego.
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Old 03-23-2011, 07:07 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
A pet peeve of mine came when the server (at Red Lobster), set down my lobster tail and proceeded to squeeze lemon juice all over it! I don't like lemon on my seafood, especially lobster.

Don't assume everyone uses lemon. Lots of people don't like it.
That is why when I order iced tea in a restaurant, I always say, "No lemon." I love lemon, just not in my tea.

No one should ever presume you want something on your food, unless it states in the menu that it will be served that way. That way you know if you need to ask for it to be served without that item.
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Old 03-23-2011, 08:15 PM   #46
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I'm with Alix on the picky eaters. I know a lot of people who won't even try something because they've never had it before.

Another one is people who automatically salt, or otherwise season, their food without tasting it first. My cousin was visiting us years ago, and he automatically grabbed the salt shaker and liberally shook it all over his corned beef (which he had never tried before).

I am so totally with you on this one! My husband douses everything in salt and it drives me bloody mental, especially when I've spent an hour our two putting a lovely dinner together.

I 'joke' that he'd put salt in Salt Soup if I served it to him!
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Old 03-24-2011, 10:51 PM   #47
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I wouldn't say it makes me angry, but I find it strange that mexican dishes get loaded up with cilantro, an herb that originated in Asia. I really dislike cilantro, but I love mexican food, so it bothers me that "authentic" mexican food has to be drowned in cilantro :(
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Old 03-25-2011, 03:22 AM   #48
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I love cheesus,
Who Almighty cheesus
No Kraft cheesus

Tripe ala mode de Caen smells like a satanic botty cough and tastes like eating 1 yrs old chabichou.
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Old 03-25-2011, 05:48 AM   #49
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I hate it when someone takes a classic dish, substitutes everything or most everything so that the new one has few or none of the ingredients of the original, yet calls it by the name of the classic dish. To me, that's blasphemy! Banana's Foster comes to mind as a recent example.

This happens a lot with the French "Mother Sauces" such as Bechamel or Hollandaise, or popular sauces such as Alfredo sauce.
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Old 03-25-2011, 08:33 AM   #50
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Dumplings. Here in the states they are different in various regions. For me a dumpling is a biscuit like creation , light and fluffy and sitting atop a lovely meat and veggie stew. I was working as a truck driver and stopped at a truck stop that had an "Amish" restaurant. Chicken and dumplings were on the menu and my mouth just watered at the thought of dumplings so I ordered it. (It's awfully hard to find anything but fast food in truck stops these days.) Imagine my disappointment when what I got was nothing more than chicken noodle soup. Apparently dumplings can also be sort of fat noodles. I know that people from the south especially swear by their dumplings but for me, well, just give me the fat fluffy ones.
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