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Old 06-23-2015, 12:48 PM   #61
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Chief--when you use hominy, are you used the canned hominy or the dry? I detest the texture of the canned hominy. Love the dry blue hominy I get from Purcell's in Idaho. It has a very nice texture and "corn" flavor. Reminds me of blue corn chips!
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Old 06-23-2015, 12:53 PM   #62
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I'm taking the zucchini out (that's getting made into a slaw), adding a 2nd cob of corn (one will be grilled, the other will be milked), adding tomatoes (which will be added fresh to give it a "summer" feel). I think those are all the changes I've made. Might grill 1/2 of the red pepper, but that might make the recipe too complicated for the people who buy the ingredients and recipes. And, since edamame is grown in Ontario, I've added that since there were no beans in the recipe and this is part of the 52-weeks of local recipes.


Instead of making zucchini slaw with tarragon as I usually do, I'm carrying the flavor profile for the salmon and succotash over to the slaw by using chipotle EVOO, some ancho chili flakes, fresh basil, garlic, and baby red onion and adding diced red pepper to the zucchini slaw. The boss is on his honeymoon...when the cat's away, the mice will play!


I am quite familiar with what falls flat with these recipes. The recipe doesn't have the flavours layered like the ones from the Chefs. Maybe next year, the boss will listen to me and stop using that company. Also, I'd rather tweak the recipe before the photographer shoots it. It is more cost-effective. That way, the boss doesn't have to pay us to do it again (and, the ingredients don't have to be bought again). When the meal kits go out, we use our suppliers. But for 2-portions, I go to the grocery store or fishmonger.


Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I am not a fan of succotash. I didn't grow up in the south, but I do like all the ingredients. Lima beans don't grow up here, so we can only get frozen or imported ones.
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Old 06-23-2015, 01:00 PM   #63
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Chief--when you use hominy, are you used the canned hominy or the dry? I detest the texture of the canned hominy. Love the dry blue hominy I get from Purcell's in Idaho. It has a very nice texture and "corn" flavor. Reminds me of blue corn chips!
I've used both, but as the dry is hard to come by around these parts, I usually use the canned. Ya just have to make do with what you can get.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-25-2015, 02:05 AM   #64
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If I need strong corn flavor in a creamy dish, I cut the cob into four pieces and throw them into the pot. Then, I remove them and discard when it's time to present whatever it is that I'm making.

Also, I don't use sweet corn for corn chowder, but hominy. It's more authentic to my heritage, and in my opinion, tastes better for that purpose. Sweet corn makes a wonderful corn pudding, and of course is great as a side dish, in succotash, and at a barbecue.

Addie, I'm not saying that your chowder is not good, or even great. In fact, most recipes for corn chowder call for sweet corn, or a combination of cream corn and sweet corn. I'm just saying that it's not right for me.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief I make my chowder the same way Jasper White makes his. He is the guru of chowders here in New England. He used to own two upscale restaurants here in Boston. Sold them both and now owns a few restaurants that specialize in seafood. It is called the Summer Shack. I have always made my chowder the same way he does. And I was making it long before I ever heard of him. I don't thicken it and neither does he. You can't put oysterette cracker in a thick blob of what should be thin enough for crackers. No corn starch in our chowder. I prefer to depend on the milk of the corn and cream.
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Old 06-25-2015, 04:36 AM   #65
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I was able to do the succotash "as written" and "CWS' version." The difference was very noticeable. The original version was heavy and had a very "muddy" look to it. Okay, the salmon and succotash had about the same color when plated. Not very attractive, IMO.


I roasted 1 cob of corn in the oven (brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with chipotle--able to do that at the same time as the salmon). the other cob I treated as written in the original recipe. I added the kernels of the roasted cob of corn at the end with the diced and seeded heirloom tomato once the cooked succotash was pulled off the heat, about a tsp of fresh lime juice, and herbs (cilantro, basil, It. parsley) mixed in before plating. Taste testers each gave it a big high five over the "original" recipe. My deconstructed recipe carried the cohesion of the flavor profile across to the succotash and zucchini slaw. It was so much fresher and screamed "high summer produce from the garden" over what the succotash the recipe developer submitted. The zucchini slaw tied all flavors together and was also very fresh. There are 10 ingredients (including the herbs) that can be sourced from the farm gate late July - August, and two local products (the jalapeno white balsamic vinegar and cold-pressed canola oil for the dressing used on the slaw). If one has a garden, the meal is one that one could do after a walk out to the garden to see what is available. For those without gardens, the meal will make them wish they had planted a garden. The tsp of fresh lime juice brightened up the succotash and I used the zest in zucchini slaw. Plated, it was really pretty. When the recipe gets featured, I will post a link to the food photographer's photos.


Thanks everyone for your suggestions/collaboration. I have been noodling how to fix this recipe since late April. I was thrilled all the noodling, research, and discussion about this paid off.


The corn "milk" worked in place of cream. I did add a tsp of raw sugar to the succotash but brown sugar could be used instead (to taste). This recipe/meal one that meets the criteria for eating local and seasonally available food. Now for that pork chop recipe that bugs me....
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Old 06-25-2015, 07:19 AM   #66
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I was able to do the succotash "as written" and "CWS' version." The difference was very noticeable. The original version was heavy and had a very "muddy" look to it. Okay, the salmon and succotash had about the same color when plated. Not very attractive, IMO.


I roasted 1 cob of corn in the oven (brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with chipotle--able to do that at the same time as the salmon). the other cob I treated as written in the original recipe. I added the kernels of the roasted cob of corn at the end with the diced and seeded heirloom tomato once the cooked succotash was pulled off the heat, about a tsp of fresh lime juice, and herbs (cilantro, basil, It. parsley) mixed in before plating. Taste testers each gave it a big high five over the "original" recipe. My deconstructed recipe carried the cohesion of the flavor profile across to the succotash and zucchini slaw. It was so much fresher and screamed "high summer produce from the garden" over what the succotash the recipe developer submitted. The zucchini slaw tied all flavors together and was also very fresh. There are 10 ingredients (including the herbs) that can be sourced from the farm gate late July - August, and two local products (the jalapeno white balsamic vinegar and cold-pressed canola oil for the dressing used on the slaw). If one has a garden, the meal is one that one could do after a walk out to the garden to see what is available. For those without gardens, the meal will make them wish they had planted a garden. The tsp of fresh lime juice brightened up the succotash and I used the zest in zucchini slaw. Plated, it was really pretty. When the recipe gets featured, I will post a link to the food photographer's photos.


Thanks everyone for your suggestions/collaboration. I have been noodling how to fix this recipe since late April. I was thrilled all the noodling, research, and discussion about this paid off.


The corn "milk" worked in place of cream. I did add a tsp of raw sugar to the succotash but brown sugar could be used instead (to taste). This recipe/meal one that meets the criteria for eating local and seasonally available food. Now for that pork chop recipe that bugs me....
A little research always pays off. Nice job. The ingredient list and technique say one thing to me; you are a real pro, and a gourmand.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-25-2015, 07:33 AM   #67
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A little research always pays off. Nice job. The ingredient list and technique say one thing to me; you are a real pro, and a gourmand.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks, Chief. It is gratifying when what you think in your head will work and scribble on paper actually does work. The constraints re: number of steps meant I couldn't add some grated fresh jalapeno to the slaw nor could I do anything other than dice the red pepper and the tomato. But, what I was able to do elevated the recipe and brought it to the level clients expect. And, features all those great things from the garden that are available here mid-July to late August. The boss is away...it'll be interesting to find out what he has to say about my tweaks...
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A succotash recipe from my antique, out of print cookbook find I altered this recipe to what I had on hand. I also believe that it can be "veganised". It is VERY important that you buy the green lima beans from the frozen vegetable section. Otherwise you won't get the same result and a much inferior dish. The recipe is meant for fresh vegetables but I have yet to find fresh green lima beans. Lima Bean And Corn Succotash 2 cups lima beans (I used two packages frozen green lima beans) 1 T sugar 1 t pepper (I used black) 3 T butter (a vegan substitute can be made here) 3 cups raw corn kernels (about two drained cans or two regular frozen packs) I used canned bc that's what I had available. I think fresh cut or frozen would be tastier. 1 t salt (I prefer sea salt) 1/4 c milk or cream (I used 2% milk bc that's what I had on hand but next time I'll use whole milk). A vegan substitute can be made here 1 t grated onion or onion juice. I used dry onion powder. NOT onion salt. Combine ingredients in a sauce pan. Let simmer slowly 20 minutes and serve. Yields six servings as a side dish but I think it's good enough for a main dish. 3 stars 1 reviews
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