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Old 04-22-2007, 10:46 AM   #1
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Broken rules for roasties!

All my recipe books etc say one should par boil potatoes before roasting them.
Today I had been gardening and wanted a short cut . I just put all my potatoes, carrots and onions in the hot oil and bunged it in the oven and left it. They cooked just as well and nice and crispy. Cabbage didn't go in the tin though!

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Old 04-22-2007, 11:31 AM   #2
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I used to preboil the potatoes before roasting, thinking they would cook faster that way, but since I figured out if I cube the potatoes small enough they cook perfectly after being put in the oven directly, and actually I liked the texture better this way, I have never gone back to the preboiling method!!
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Old 04-22-2007, 11:48 AM   #3
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I've never par-boiled my potatoes, just cut them to the size I like and put them in the pan with oil,salt and pepper, shut the door and turn them now and then..Towards the end I add any herbs I feel will go along with the rest of the food.

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Old 04-22-2007, 08:34 PM   #4
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We toss our potatoes in olive oil along with S&P and other seasoning before we put them in the oven. We've never pre-cooked them.

Although we generally do them in the skillet, we have utilized leftover baked potatoes this way. Just crank the heat up a little higher, and keep an eye on them.
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Old 04-22-2007, 08:44 PM   #5
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I've been cooking for nearly 50 years and have never precooked potatoes when cooking with a roast of any kind. Mine always turn out fine.
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Old 04-23-2007, 01:27 AM   #6
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I sometimes parboil potatos when I want them really crunchy. Boil just for a few minutes then rough up the surfaces with a fork before roasting.
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Old 04-23-2007, 03:51 AM   #7
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Well, I think there are two types of roast potato. The one I'll call the continental, is smaller cubed, well coated in oil or duck fat and needs no parboiling, then the (for this discussion so named) English roastie, which IS better parboiled, shaken (and the addition of semolina for added crucnh is a winner!) then added to the hot fat. These are bigger, and have more fluff inside. They are both good.
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Old 04-23-2007, 07:13 AM   #8
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Either way is just as good IMO, it all depends on the Type of roasters you like, the par boiled ones tend to have a rougher outside texture and lots of Crispy bits, the un boiled tend to hold together a little better and have a smoother finish with hard crunchy corners.

I like either and equaly :)
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Old 04-23-2007, 07:52 AM   #9
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JUst to add, I like both equally but with different things.....the english kind, imo, are always going to suit a traditional joint/chicken and gravy, where as the smaller, continental kind, are geat with, for example, duck breasts, and unsuffed chickens, and meals where the meat is less plain.
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Old 04-23-2007, 07:55 AM   #10
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I'm not a great recipe adherer. I tend to edit them to our own taste as I go along. Or else just make things up without a recipe.
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