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Old 06-24-2005, 05:59 PM   #1
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Question Brussel Sprout Leaves?

I am growing brussel sprouts in my garden right now and they seem to be doing well. They have these large beautiful leaves. I was wondering, can these can be cooked up too?
They seem nice and luscious like collard greens.

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Old 06-24-2005, 06:04 PM   #2
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I'm not sure GB, but I'd give it a try..Steam or saute them and see if they are too strong , I love BS just steamed with salt pepper and butter. Don't know why the leaves couldn't be used.

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Old 06-24-2005, 07:34 PM   #3
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Thanks kadesma. I will try steaming them and see what happens
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Old 06-24-2005, 08:23 PM   #4
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Hi GB,

I found a couple of links that said the leaves of brussels sprout plants can be prepared like collards or kale.

Here's one of the links: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/p.../brus.spt.html

Lee
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Old 06-24-2005, 08:27 PM   #5
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Thanks QSis! That is some great info. Well I better start eating the leaves, because it sounds like I planted these at the worst possible time
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Old 06-25-2005, 09:51 AM   #6
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GB, if you'll notice, it takes brussels sprouts 120 days to mature...that's four months. Here, our average first killing frost is Oct. 15, so we have to get them in the ground by the end of May or so. Just keep them watered, well fed and dusted, and be patient. The sprouts have the best flavor after frost, and you should be able to pick them well through Thanksgiving.
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Old 06-25-2005, 09:56 AM   #7
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Thanks Constance!

I am pretty new to gardening so this is all pretty much Greek to me. When you say to keep them dusted, what exactly do you mean?
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Old 06-25-2005, 10:11 AM   #8
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gb, brussel sprouts actually taste better after cooler weather has set in, especially after a light frost, so i'm guessing you should be right on target for septembah haavesting up there in mass. they grow a very shallow root ball (relative to the size of the plant), so be careful to keep them well watered but not drowning. also, they require a lot of nitrogen (it's a green plant. all things green need lots of N), and from what i've read, boron. try using a fish emulsion fertilizer.
while it's growing, watch out for problems with aphids, cabbage worms, and powdery mildew.
there's lots of nasty chemicals out there like permethrin or sevin to get rid of the bugs, but i prefer to use my own organic cocktail of hot peppers and tobacco (the little bit left from a spent cigarette). it has to be applied often to be effective. also, a good blast of cold water from the hose will wash many of them away each day.
for the powdery mildew, sprinkle the plants with sulfur. it will retard the growth of leaf molds and fungi.
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Old 06-25-2005, 10:19 AM   #9
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Great info! Thanks BT!

I read somewhere that ash is good for gardens too. I hope I read that right because I saved all the ash from my wood stove this winter and mixed some into the garden as I was prepping it to be planted. Anyone know anything about this?

I originally heard about ash specifically for roses. I bought (actually my daughter bought) a rose bush for mommy for mothers day and I put a shovel full of ash in the hole I dug for the rose bush. I am pretty sure I also read about it for the garden so I hope this is right. The garden looks awesome so far (except for some of my basil) so I am not too worried
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Old 06-25-2005, 10:27 AM   #10
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here ya go dude!!

http://www.emmitsburg.net/gardens/ar...2004/ashes.htm
it's important to check the pH of your soil before adding anything when planting. you may have a soil pH of 7.0 already, in which adding ash would be overkill.
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