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Old 12-17-2004, 04:57 PM   #11
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Brussel Sprounts in celery sauce

Brussel sprouts in celery sauce

1 lb. brussel sprouts, washed and trimmed
1 1/2 cups chopped celery
3 T. butter
3 T. all-puropse flour
1 cup milk
celery salt and pepper to taste

Cook sprouts in boiling salted water until tender. Drain. Cook celery in salted water until tender; drain and reserve 1/2 cup cerery water. Melt butter in heavy saucepan. Add flour; mix celery water with milk. Stir into flour mixture; heat until sauce is thickened. Season with celery salt and pepper. Add celery; pour over hot brussel sprouts.
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Old 12-17-2004, 09:38 PM   #12
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brussel sprouts that are bitter are bad brussel sprouts. the place you ate them should be ashamed. they are very easy to grow. they grow on a big stalk of a plant, and emerge at the "elbow" of where each branch comes out of the stalk. i think of them as tiny green cabbages. i steam mine until tender, then bathe them in butter and salt.
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Old 12-18-2004, 08:51 AM   #13
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I like steamed brussel sprouts, too! - I only use smaller, tender ones, though. The bigger ones I steam, then mash and add to creamed, mashed potatoes.

I like to fry some pancetta, cut into small chunks, until crispy and then add it to the steamed sprouts.
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Old 12-18-2004, 12:28 PM   #14
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I've only had b. sprouts 2xs, once it was at home. My brother made it for a holiday dinner and used a magazine recipe (either Bon Apetite or Gourmet) and then at the resturant the other day. Brother's was bitter and yucky, the rest. was really really goood

So if B. sprouts are bitter, does that mean they are not fresh? So if I use frozen b. sprouts for a recipe, it should not taste bitter? since they are usually picked/frozen at peak freshness?
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Old 12-18-2004, 05:54 PM   #15
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I've never eaten a frozen vegetable that I've liked - well except for petit pois!

Brussel sprouts shouldn't be bitter. If picked young and either steamed or boiled soon after picking, they are kind of mid-way between spinach and spring greens (do you have 'spring greens' in the USA?)
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Old 12-18-2004, 06:25 PM   #16
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Brussel sprouts are evil, having said that they are traditional here at Christmas so I cook them, and eat them, and no complain! With the addition of chestnuts and plenty of butter they aren't too bad I suppose. I steam them for about 7 - 10 minutes and then toss them in butter with the prepared chestnuts. I buy them organically from our local farmers market.

I always found them bitter when I was a kid, but I think that's because my dad boiled them for what seemed like weeks before we ate them, but was probably like an hour, not good for any veggie.
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Old 12-18-2004, 06:35 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyles
Brussel sprouts are evil, having said that they are traditional here at Christmas so I cook them, and eat them, and no complain! With the addition of chestnuts and plenty of butter they aren't too bad I suppose. I steam them for about 7 - 10 minutes and then toss them in butter with the prepared chestnuts. I buy them organically from our local farmers market.

I always found them bitter when I was a kid, but I think that's because my dad boiled them for what seemed like weeks before we ate them, but was probably like an hour, not good for any veggie.
So glad to see that we are 'educating' you, Kyles 8) I WISH I liked chestnuts - the only way I like them is roasted.... Buying them from street stalls in London was always a winter treat... :D

Boiled for an HOUR? No wonder you didn't like them!
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Old 12-18-2004, 10:55 PM   #18
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ishbel, we love chestnuts so much here in the us that we stand in our open doorways bragging about them... :D
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Old 12-19-2004, 05:09 PM   #19
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I didn't like brussels sprouts when I was first introduced to them, but now love them. Unlike others, I think freezing is the best thing to happen to vegetables in our life time. I do buy the best and smallest, though (of any veg). It's a great "concept" to only eat veggies fresh and locally in season, which you hear all the time on TV. I still haven't figured out what veggies are fresh and in season in NYC (where most cooking shows originate) in February, because the rest of us who live with four seasons get fresh only from somewhere considerably south, shipped in. There are two kinds of people who only eat fresh in season ... those who live in warm year round climates, and those who suffer malnutrition and constipation because fresh veggies and winter are not compatible.

That said, I like to steam brussels sprouts if they're fresh, or nuke them if frozen, until warm. Then I split them in half, and put a bit of butter in the bottom of a frying pan, and place them in the melted butter cut side down. I gently cook them in the butter for just a minute or two, then toss with a tablespoon of frozen orange juice concentrate. A big hit. Of course you can use regular OJ and cook it down (when I lived in FL and HI I did sometimes do that because I was getting oranges for free) with a bit of sugar. But the concentrate works better!
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Old 12-20-2004, 01:35 AM   #20
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claire, nyc has 3 of the world's greatest markets for fresh produce and meats/fish. the fulton fish market, and the hunt's point market (for fresh produce), and the meat markets on the west side known as the gansevoort markets. if anything is in season anywhere in the usa, it is trucked in on route 80 or up I95. foodstuffs from all over the world are flown, shipped or trucked in fresh everyday.
you can't beat locally, and especially organically grown produce during the growing seasons from new jersey, pennsylvania, and upstate new york/new england, but we are lucky to be a port city and get fresh produce all year 'round from all 'round the world.
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