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Old 02-13-2012, 10:22 AM   #111
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Oh, gee. I'd like to be flattered, but you've never seen me. I'll take it as a compliment anyway!
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:06 AM   #112
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@ Claire: Mexican Grocers in Chicago

@ Claire,

I do not know how far you are from Chicago, however, most Mexican grocers in the USA carry Spanish " La Vera " Smoked Paprika, from La Vera, EXtremadura, Spain in either a sweet ( dulce ) or piquant form ( picante ). PIMENTÓN DULCE o PIMENTÓN PICANTE in Spanish.

This would be awesome in Portuguese or Spanish or Galician Bean Soups.
Galicia is the Northwestern corner, north of Portugal.

Happy Valentine´s.
Margi Cintrano
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Old 02-13-2012, 02:07 PM   #113
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Marji, Galena is the other side of the state from Chicago, on the Mississippi River. In terms of big towns the Quad Cities are closer. But, either way, it would be quite a drive.
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:53 AM   #114
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Historic foodie, thank you for helping me let people know that I live in rural Illinois, not Chicago. I could (and have) gone to the QC or Madison for certain ingredients. But it isn't something I can do when I wake in the morning and decide to go grocery shopping. And nowadays I can (and have) bought stuff on the internet. We aren't a back-water,, and Dubuque (the nearest city) isn't too bad now (was horrible 10 years ago when I moved here). I also count as friends a spice merchant and a gourmet store owner (it's a tourist town), so can get what I want.

But NO! Not everyone in Illinois lives in Chicago or a place near enough to go there for grocery shopping. Californians can suffer that belief as well (yes, I lived in rural California in my life). This is one huge country that many people don't even get the gist of. Now we're lucky enough to be able to buy stuff on-line. A real boon to my life.
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:56 AM   #115
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Oh, by the way, we do have a Mexican grocer in town, small though we are. I don't think he carries much in the way of spices, though.
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Old 02-14-2012, 07:35 AM   #116
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This is one huge country that many people don't even get the gist of.

Especially when it comes to cookery.

I'm always amused when a celebrity chef says something like, "available in stores everywhere...." Sure. So long as you define "everywhere" as New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles.

Most people, especially urbanites, not only do not realize how big this country is, they haven't a clue how empty it can be, once you're even a short way out of the city.

I live within the SMSA of the second largest city in Kentucky. But my nearest neighbor is about a half mile away.

Rural living certainly has its advantages---that's why I chose it. But for a cook it is not exactly ingredients-central. We shop in Lexington (30 miles away) because even the supermarkets here in town do not carry much of what we need. Even so, we visit as many as 8 stores in Lexington, each week, and still have to order many things on line.

There is, in the whole region, one real butcher---who has high prices and small selection; one fishmonger---but you wouldn't want to buy anything there, cause the place smells so bad; and zero, nada, no bake shops worth the name.

I don't want to imply that it's all bad. If you take the time to ferret them out, there are small ethnic and specialty stores. Unfortunately, they go in and out of business so often it's hard to keep up. And there's a water mill only 45 miles away, where I buy my flours. Not being confined to a suburban backyard, my gardens could be the size of Rhode Island if I so wished. Alternatively, during the growing season, if I throw a rock in any direction I'll hit a farmers market or farmstand. And in a pinch, both Louisville and Cincinnate are about 85 miles away.
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Old 02-14-2012, 11:47 AM   #117
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And in the same theme, in Texas, Oklahoma and cattle states, the families of ranches usually own a plane and have a small landing strip. Their nearest neighbor is within flying distance. Not driving. To drive to your neighbors, could take as much as three or four hours. America is big and we don't like to be crowded.
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Old 02-14-2012, 11:51 AM   #118
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An Italian Deli

Historic Foodie and Claire,

Good Afternoon.

I would flip out literally if I did not live near an Italian Deli ... afterall, imagine an Italian without Bufala Mozzarella or Pecorino or Parmesano ?
Sort of hard to imagine, yes ? Lucky, I can make my own Egg Fettuccini, Canelloni Sheets and Tagliatelli ...

I am pretty good on the geography; however, I did not look on an Illinois map. Thank H.F. for explaining the details.

I like Chicago, and enjoyed the food scene when I was last there. Superior Italian American cuisine ... I also had gone to a wonderful Tapas Bar called Ba Ba Ree Ba which is on Northside of River. It was truly enjoyable and then, the Greek Ouzería (Tavern) which we also liked enormously.

Ask the Latin Grocer, most carry LA VERA PIMENTÓN DULCE O PICANTE from La Vera, Spain ... this shall make a difference in ur Portuguese cassolas ... ( bean stews )

Have a lovely Valentine´s
Margi.
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Old 02-14-2012, 11:55 AM   #119
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Born and bred Urbanite ... pavement & skyscrapers ...

@ Addie,

Happy Valentine´s.

I am a Urban woman ... Would flip if I had to drive to an Italian Deli for my pecorino or Bufala d´Mozzarella ... I walk to the corner !

Yes, I know how rural the USA and Canada can be. The Mediterranean hamlets can be fairly rural and remote too ...

Lovely San Valentine´s to all,
M.C.
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:15 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
@ Addie,

Happy Valentine´s.

I am a Urban woman ... Would flip if I had to drive to an Italian Deli for my pecorino or Bufala d´Mozzarella ... I walk to the corner !

Yes, I know how rural the USA and Canada can be. The Mediterranean hamlets can be fairly rural and remote too ...

Lovely San Valentine´s to all,
M.C.
Last night I was watching Andrew Zimmerman. He is a fella that travels around the world eating strange foods. He visited Boston and one of the places he visited was Boston's North End. Visions of my childhood came flooding back. He went into a typical Italian store. Piles of wheels of cheeses from all over Italy. The aromas of that store came right off the TV screen to me. When I was a child there were two Italian neighborhoods in Boston. One in the North End and the other in East Boston where I grew up. We had pushcarts that made the rounds every day with their fresh produce. After the man would return to his little store and you could go there to get what you needed for the days cooking. There were several stores where you could get your cheeses by the chunk. Now my little town is in transition. The Italians are slowly dying off and the next generation has moved to the suburbs. And a new groups of immigrants are moving in. But that is as it should be. If I ever get a hanking for my childhood, I just have to go across the harbor to the North End.
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