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Old 02-03-2012, 11:56 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
Gwampke (or similar) is Polish. My MIL called it Halupke (Slovene or Slovak, not sure which or maybe both). I think every eastern European country has their version with its own name and slightly (or maybe very) different preparations. Over the years I took my mom's, my MIL's, and my mom's best friend's preparations, added my own. So it is Slovene, Slovak, Polish and wherever Mom learned hers.

I cannot remember where my best friend's husband's family comes from, but he insists on no tomato in the sauce, but then, likes tomato so much she prepares it on the side!
Swedish cabbage rolls, kåldolmar, don't use tomato. Maybe there is a reaction between the cabbage and the tomato. I detest cabbage rolls, but I don't remember disliking my grandmother's kåldolmar. I didn't have them often because she lived in Sweden. I don't remember if my mum made them.
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Old 02-03-2012, 12:21 PM   #22
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I make KFC cole slaw with cabbage. Luv the stuff. Eat the whole bowl of it myself.
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Old 02-03-2012, 01:18 PM   #23
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Did they not suggest toasting the cumin and corriander seeds before grinding?

I'm always surprised, Craig, at the number of cooks who don't do that. Even many professionals don't seem to understand the difference it makes.

Bubble ans Squeak. Compliments of Two Fat Ladies? The Irish call it Colcannon.

Bubble & Squeak is traditionally made with beef, whereas Colcannon is made with ham or bacon (which, in Ireland, often means the same thing). Had two Irish visitors to the historic site I work at independently tell me they make Colcannon with kale, rather than cabbage. They were both Dubliners, however, so I wonder if it's just a local thing?

Anyway, we're really big on cabbage---all types and all its relatives---here. It would take a book to list all the ways we prepare it. But, among our favorites, is one I adapted from a traditional Amish recipe (which, of course, means it was probably German to begin with) using red cabbage:

Sweet & Sour Red Cabbage

1/4 lb bacon, cut in lardons (or about 6 thick-sliced slices)
3/4 cup chopped onions
6 cups thinly sliced red cabbage
1 large apples, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped
3/4 cup apple cider or juice
1/2 tsp salt
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp dried dill
1 tsp wole fennel seeds, toasted
1 tsp caraway seeds, toasted
3 tbls cider vienegar
1 tbls honey

Fry the bacon until lightly browned and fat has rendered out. Remove bacon from pot and reserve.

Saute the onios in the bacon fat until they start to color. Add the cabbage and continue sauteeing for 5-10 minutes, until cabbage wilts. Add the rest of the ingredients.

Cook over low heat, covered, for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. The cabbage will be greatly reduced in volume. Towards the end of cooking taste and adjust with more vinegar or honey as necessary. Stir in the reserved lardons.
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:00 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Did they not suggest toasting the cumin and corriander seeds before grinding?

I'm always surprised, Craig, at the number of cooks who don't do that. Even many professionals don't seem to understand the difference it makes.

Bubble ans Squeak. Compliments of Two Fat Ladies? The Irish call it Colcannon.

Bubble & Squeak is traditionally made with beef, whereas Colcannon is made with ham or bacon (which, in Ireland, often means the same thing). Had two Irish visitors to the historic site I work at independently tell me they make Colcannon with kale, rather than cabbage. They were both Dubliners, however, so I wonder if it's just a local thing?

Anyway, we're really big on cabbage---all types and all its relatives---here. It would take a book to list all the ways we prepare it. But, among our favorites, is one I adapted from a traditional Amish recipe (which, of course, means it was probably German to begin with) using red cabbage:

Sweet & Sour Red Cabbage

1/4 lb bacon, cut in lardons (or about 6 thick-sliced slices)
3/4 cup chopped onions
6 cups thinly sliced red cabbage
1 large apples, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped
3/4 cup apple cider or juice
1/2 tsp salt
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp dried dill
1 tsp wole fennel seeds, toasted
1 tsp caraway seeds, toasted
3 tbls cider vienegar
1 tbls honey

Fry the bacon until lightly browned and fat has rendered out. Remove bacon from pot and reserve.

Saute the onios in the bacon fat until they start to color. Add the cabbage and continue sauteeing for 5-10 minutes, until cabbage wilts. Add the rest of the ingredients.

Cook over low heat, covered, for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. The cabbage will be greatly reduced in volume. Towards the end of cooking taste and adjust with more vinegar or honey as necessary. Stir in the reserved lardons.
That is a version of Rotkohl, a side dish I like with sauerbraten or schweinebraten.

Craig
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:11 PM   #25
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Thanks for that name, Craig. One of the great things about cooking is that there are always new things to learn, if you leave yourself open to them. I'm assuming "Rotkohl" is German???

Stange, now that I think about it, but of all the world's cuisines, German is probably the one I know the least about. No particular reason; just the way it's worked out.
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:22 PM   #26
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now you all have me so hungry for cabbage that i'm going to have to make a cabbage run. i usually have it on hand, but i recently shredded my last cabbage into a spare ribs and sauerkraut pot....
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:45 PM   #27
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Shred your cabbage, and put it in an oiled baking pan. Add evaporated milk, to cover the cabbage about half-way. Salt and pepper to taste. Cover with bread crumbs and dot with butter.

Bake til hot and bubbly and cabbage is tender.

That is also nice if you leave off the bread crumbs and top it with pork chops or pork steaks. The resulting sauce is a nice topper on some baked potatoes.
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:11 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Thanks for that name, Craig. One of the great things about cooking is that there are always new things to learn, if you leave yourself open to them. I'm assuming "Rotkohl" is German???

Stange, now that I think about it, but of all the world's cuisines, German is probably the one I know the least about. No particular reason; just the way it's worked out.
Germany is one country that makes this type of cabbage dish. I'm sure there are Polish and Hungarian versions as well as Austrian, etc. Rotkohl is the German name for it.

I would love to know the regional cusines of native Americans, but I'm guessing folks were more interested in their land back then more so than their culture.

Craig
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:14 PM   #29
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I like it grated, steamed, then covered with cheese sauce....served with mashed potatoes and roast pork.
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:40 PM   #30
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I would love to know the regional cusines of native Americans

If you want to talk about that, Craig, let's start a new thread, instead of hijacking this one.

One quick word, though. The who-when-where questions, essential to any historical research, are particularly important here. Regional differences are just one aspect. Others include tribal/cultural affiliations and time. Native foodways of the pre- early- and late-reservation periods, for instance, can be very different even within the same tribal unit.

Even more important are the differences between pre- and post-European contact.
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