"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Vegetables
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-04-2012, 05:51 PM   #41
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytrim View Post
Yum!!
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 07:35 PM   #42
Cupcake
 
Kathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mid-Atlantic, USA
Posts: 2,315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Around me, it's slaw with BBQ, Fried Catfish etc. ~~ Also cabbage "greens"...Cooked like any other greens with smoked pork parts of your choice. ~ Cornbread in one shape or form is always on the side. ~~ For a full meal deal, add several sliced weenies while cooking...serve with cornbread, and yellow mustard for dipping the weenies in....
I've not thought to cook cabbage just like greens. I love cabbage. I love greens. I'll bet it would be delicious. I agree, Uncle Bob. You got to have cornbread!
__________________

__________________
A little bit Ginger. A little bit Mary Ann.
Kathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 08:50 PM   #43
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,722
I didn't read the whole thread. Did anyone mention a New England Boiled Dinner?
__________________
joesfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 08:56 PM   #44
Chef Extraordinaire
 
babetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: escondido, calif. near san diego
Posts: 14,349
my baby carrots and cabbage are ready to eat. i put in small crock-pot with a bit of low sodium chicken broth. added garlic powder and lots of pepper. just need to quickly grill the pork loin chop and dinner is ready. can't wait , i love cabbage. wish i could have some cornbread.
__________________
"life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain"
babetoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 09:39 PM   #45
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,894
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
I didn't read the whole thread. Did anyone mention a New England Boiled Dinner?
More than once, if I remember correctly.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 09:42 PM   #46
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
I've been following this topic for quite some time, and I just love cabbage! I just love all Brassica. This includes cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, the Asian kai lan or gai lan and very importantly mustard, responsible for our prepared mustard spread.

Notwithstanding the traditional cabbage and corn beef Irish dish, I've found an Asian cabbage recipe that I really liked although I'm puzzled.

You take a whole cabbage (traditional or Napa) and quarter it, then cut out the stems, then cut it into approx. 2"x2" squares. Heat some toasted sesame oil in a wok, perhaps 2-3 Tablespoons, then saute the cabbage for a bit. Then add some fluid (perhaps water or stock) and cover, steam it for several minutes then salt it to taste when done.

I can't find my original notes on this recipe. I suspect it came from one of my Asian cookbooks, probably Chinese, but I'm amazed that I don't understand why the toasted sesame oil does not overpower the recipe. In fact the result is to my taste very subtle.

Did I say I love Brassica?


ETA: rapeseed (Canola oil), kale, cauliflower, turnips, rutabagas. Brassica is very important to many of our favorite foods..
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 09:56 PM   #47
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Central Kentucky---Where The Bluegrass Meets The Mountains
Posts: 266
That is strange, Greg, given the quantity of sesame oil. I wonder if the steaming somehow mellows it out?

Normally I use toasted sesame as a finish oil. Given your recipe, my inclination would be to do the initial saute in a neutral oil, or maybe peanut. Then, just before it's done, sprinkle some toasted sesame oil in both for flavor and to give everything a slight gloss.

But what the hay! If it works, it works.

A little trivia that might interest you: In the 18th century, taken as a group the brassicas where the most popular vegetales grown. All the cabbages, certainly. But also mustard, turnips, beets, kale, collards (which they called "coleworts") etc.

They also used them in ways that have, unfortunately, fallen out of favor. For instance, after radishes bolted they would pickle the pods, and use them similar to capers.
__________________
Most people spoil garden things by over-boiling them... if they are overboiled they have neither any sweetness or beauty. Hannah Glasse 1745
HistoricFoodie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 10:25 PM   #48
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
That is strange, Greg, given the quantity of sesame oil. I wonder if the steaming somehow mellows it out?

Normally I use toasted sesame as a finish oil. Given your recipe, my inclination would be to do the initial saute in a neutral oil, or maybe peanut. Then, just before it's done, sprinkle some toasted sesame oil in both for flavor and to give everything a slight gloss.

But what the hay! If it works, it works.

A little trivia that might interest you: In the 18th century, taken as a group the brassicas where the most popular vegetales grown. All the cabbages, certainly. But also mustard, turnips, beets, kale, collards (which they called "coleworts") etc.
I'm with you, I just don't understand why my suggested recipe (cabbage cooked in toasted sesame oil) works. I don't understand why this is not spicy. I got the idea from one of my Asian cookbooks (now all of them at my storage unit and not accessible) and I'm stuck with my memory of the recipe (my memory isn't very good which is why I like to post my recipes on the Internet, partly because I can refer/access them too, from anywhere).

A lot of people don't like Brassica. I'm not one of them. I'm enthused to post some recipes for kai lan, gai lan or perhaps kailan or gailan, commonly available in our heavily Los Angeles Asian markets, but I'm reluctant because I understand that these vegetables are just not available over much of the nation (or overseas, except in Asia of course.) Kailan (for lack of a better word) is like broccoli except the flowers are very small and the leaves are very large, and you cook the stems and leaves (with the flowerettes as a garnish). If you like broccoli you'll like this, and if you hate broccoli you'll hate this.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 10:49 PM   #49
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Central Kentucky---Where The Bluegrass Meets The Mountains
Posts: 266
I think all those Asian greens are more available now than in the past. Most recipes using them also work with bok choy, though, and that certainly is available in most supermarkets. Barring that, broccolini, and even savoy cabbage, often substitute nicely.

What I'm saying is, post away. The recipes are adaptable.
__________________
Most people spoil garden things by over-boiling them... if they are overboiled they have neither any sweetness or beauty. Hannah Glasse 1745
HistoricFoodie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 11:01 PM   #50
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
How could I have forgotten bok choi???

I'll be very surprised if many people in US outside of L.A. have seen gailan in their markets. I've seen it in only a very few Asian markets here in L.A. (San Fernando Valley area).

Of course bok choi is far more widely available, perhaps one of the most "exotic" Asian vegetables widely available fresh, other than Napa cabbage.
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cabbage

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.