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Old 02-04-2012, 11:05 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
How could I have forgotten bok choi???

I'll be very surprised if many people in US outside of L.A. have seen gailan in their markets. I've seen it in only a very few Asian markets here in L.A. (San Fernando Valley area).

Of course bok choi is far more widely available, perhaps one of the most "exotic" Asian vegetables widely available fresh, other than Napa cabbage.
We have a nice little International Market here in Missoula, if I ask for something they try to get it for me. They make weekly trips to Spokane and once a month to Seattle. I may not be able to pick it up immediately, but I can plan a future meal.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:11 PM   #52
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I dunno, Greg. Many of the Asian greens---including gailan---are even available here in central Kentucky---where nothing exotic can be had.

Just to put a point on it, though, here is a recipe that was originally made with gailan, but which I've adapted to bok choy just because we like it better:

Several heads of bok choy, leaves separated
2 tbls peanut oil
large pinch red pepper flakes
3-4 large garlic cloves, sliced thin
2 tbls soy sauce, divided
1 tbls red wine
1 tbls fish sauce

Heat the oil in a wok. Add the pepper flakes and garlic slices, and fry, stirring constantly, until garlic starts to brown and turn crisp. Remove from wok, and set aside on paper towels.

Drop the greens into the wok and toss until they start to wilt. Add 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce and the red wine and cook, tossing, until liquid almost is evaporated. Add the second tablespoon of soy sauce and the fish sauce, cover, and let steam until greens are tender.

Transfer greens to a serving dish or individual plates. Sprinkle with the garlic chips.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:15 PM   #53
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Well Seattle and Spokane are within the Asian magnet of Asian special ingredients not commonly available in middle America. Good weather and common availability of Asian foodstuffs (and restaurants) are reasons why I favor L.A. (although my future is in flux). I don't understand where in America anybody could have better access to Asian foods and ingredients. I'm not Asian but I'm just totally awed by Asian foods and Asian cooking. Thus my (current) signature.

I was previously enchanted by Mexican food. Now that I've gone off topic, where are the Mexian/Latino cabbage recipes? Do they do that?


Mmmmm!!! HF, I like that recipe!!! Could I add some toasted peanuts?

I'm glad you told me you can get gailan in central KY. I'm not sure I'll be able to stick here in L.A. It's very important to me to continue my Asian cooking quest wherever I go. That's one of the reasons I came back to L.A. (long story there, very off topic).
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:19 PM   #54
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How could I have forgotten bok choi???

Mebbe cuz it's so often called pak choi nowadays.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:28 PM   #55
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Pak??? Not in Los Angeles. YMMV
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:38 AM   #56
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I think 90% of my cabbage intake(Napa)comes from kimchi. There are all sorts of varieties, and I haven't found on I don't like.

Eat more Korean! lol.

Not sure that it has been mentiond, but also, with the bulk, big head cabbage, you can slice it thin, blanch it, and treat it like noodles. Some tomato sauce, or bolognese, and it is surprisingly pretty tasty.
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Old 02-05-2012, 01:34 AM   #57
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Mom used to make halubi. It is called different names by dialect from different regions.

It was blanched cabbage leaves rolled with ground meat and rice. the rolls were layered in a pot with some chunky tomato sauce and simmered for hours. I have not had it in years but now i want to make it.

Sourdough goes great with it for sloppin'!
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Old 02-05-2012, 02:46 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4meandthem View Post
Mom used to make halubi. It is called different names by dialect from different regions.

It was blanched cabbage leaves rolled with ground meat and rice. the rolls were layered in a pot with some chunky tomato sauce and simmered for hours. I have not had it in years but now i want to make it.

Sourdough goes great with it for sloppin'!
You can also make a casserole with the same ingredients that is a little less work by using shredded cabbage. I have made it when a whole fresh cabbage or bag of shredded cabbage is just too much for me to use in cabbage salad. It helps to change things up and prevent monotony or waste.
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:10 AM   #59
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We all have to remember that when a language doesn't use our alphabet, how it is written in English can vary in extraordinary ways! I've seen bulgogi, bok choi, etc, spelled so many ways it is ridiculous. The b and p sounds seem interchangeable. Hence, bok, poc, pok, boc, bac, pac, etc.

My favorite was a Chinese-American friend from California, who during WWII wondered why the Germans hated the Jews. His name was Soot Jew. "What did we ever do to them?" It seems that some immigration officer in California heard the sound and wrote "Jew" as the last name. It's the same last name as "Chu" and various other spellings. But it gave this one Chinese-American a bit of confusion in his youth.

If you go to a Korean shop or restaurant, say the word aloud to yourself. You can get from "pak choi" to "bok choy", etc, just by saying it.
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Old 02-05-2012, 03:31 PM   #60
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I checked out kraut today. It has been 4 weeks since we put it in the crock and it is coming along nicely. Tis usable now and will be better as the weeks go by.
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