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Old 02-06-2012, 02:27 PM   #71
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Here's a recipe that I think came from one of my Chinese or Thai cookbooks. Unfortunately my cookbooks are in storage and I didn't take notes on this recipe, so here it is as best as I can recall it.

What surprised me is that I had thought this recipe would turn out spicy but it didn't.

Quarter a whole ordinary cabbage, cut out the stems, cut the remainder into about 2"x2" pieces. Heat a few tablespoons of toasted sesame oil in a wok and saute the cabbage a while, then add some liquid (probably water) and cover and steam until cabbage is tender, salt it and serve. The quantity of water is just sufficient to ensure steam and some liquid on the bottom, do not fully immerse.

Sorry about the vague recipe. I'll cook this again hopefully one day soon when I have my kitchen back and I'll report a more exact version.

I'm still amazed that it didn't turn out spicy. As you can guess it did have a unique flavor. The spiciness in the toasted sesame oil seemed to have mellowed out.
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:32 PM   #72
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The sesame oil I have has no spicyness to it at all, it's just tastes like toasted sesame seeds. Where is the spice coming from???
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:34 PM   #73
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Then I used the wrong word. I meant strong tasting. Toasted sesame oil has a strong taste to me. Maybe it's just me. Anyway I like it.
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:38 PM   #74
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Ah! Yes, it does have a strong flavor...one I really like. I'd wear it as perfume, but Shrek REALLY likes it too.
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:40 PM   #75
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i'm very pleasantly surprised at the ginormous response to this cabbage thread. just because we don't rave about it all the time like we do about certain other more glamorous vegetables, doesn't mean that we don't have a quiet, deep appreciation of our dear cabbage heads. just reading through the huge outpouring of responses to this cabbage thread is heart-warming as well as it is informative and hunger-inducing.... :)
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:44 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Ah! Yes, it does have a strong flavor...one I really like. I'd wear it as perfume, but Shrek REALLY likes it too.
Oh Dear! Just close the door behind you.
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:44 PM   #77
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I, too, do not find sesame seed "spicy". Just nutty. I'd add some pepper flakes or sauce.
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:01 PM   #78
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I'll be very surprised if many people in US outside of L.A. have seen gailan in their markets. I've seen it in only a very few Asian markets here in L.A. (San Fernando Valley area).
I always find it funny how New Yorkers and Angelenos think they have the market cornered on this or that, and that us rubes in other parts of the country just don't get out much.

I see Gailan (aka Kai-Lan, Chinese Broccoli, Thai Broccoli) all the time here in the Minneapolis area, both in farm markets and co-ops. But then again, I believe Minnesota has the second or third largest Hmong population outside of southeast Asia. In fact, 60% of the Hmong in the US live in the upper midwest. We have access to a huge variety of Asian ingredients.
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:01 PM   #79
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We serve corned beef and cabbage daily on our buffet. The great thing is, that cabbage cooks so easily in the microwave. Just cover with water and whatever flavorings you like, and it's done in about 10 minutes. I can't wait to try the recipe above that uses evaporated milk....it sounds like a winner!
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:06 PM   #80
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Is there anything left to cover?

Surely you jest, Addie? We've barely scratched the surface. Haven't even covered the leafy parts fully. And, as Chief Longwind notes, there are the root-veggie relatives; rutabaga (sweedes); turnips; radishes. etc. And, OMG! Brussels sprouts. Where are the Brussels sprouts recipes.

But even if we confine ourselves to cabbagge per se, there's a long way to go. F'rinstance, here's a slaw variation we like. It was passed on to me by a friend.

Marinated Red and Green Cabbage

3 1/2 ckups each, shredded red and green cabbage
2 large carrots, shredded
1 large red onion, sliced thin
2 tbls minced fresh gingerroot
1 cup cider vinegar
A handful of sultanas or golden raisins
3 tbls honey
2 tbls extra virgin olive oil
3 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias
Salt and pepper to taste

Pour an inch or so of wather into a large pot. Fit a steamer in place and bring the water to a boil. Load the steamer with the cabbage and carrots, cover tightly, and steam the veggies for about five minutes. Drain them well and transfer to a mixing bowl. Add the onions, ginger and vinegar, toss to coat, and set aside to marinate at least four hours or up to overnight.

Squeeze the megetables a handful at a time over a saucepan, transtering the drained vegetables to a bowl.

Boil the marinade liquid over high heat until it is reduced to a halp cup. Add the raisins, remove from heat, and let cool. Whisk in the honey, oil, and salt. Pour over the drained vegetables and stir in the scallions and black pepper.

Can be swerved either chilled or at room temperature.

One nice thing about this recipe: Because it doesn't use mayo it is a good choice for picnics and other outdoor eating.
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