"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Vegetables
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-13-2006, 09:45 AM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Collard Greens

Looking for a good recipe that will accompany fried chicken and mashed potatoes.

So how do you guys prepare them?
I'd really appreciate the help - don't have many resources on this one!

__________________

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 09:58 AM   #2
Senior Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Outside of Memphis, TN
Posts: 339
Send a message via Yahoo to FraidKnot
Heck, they aren't difficult. Do you cook spinach? (well, at least before the eColi thing out in So Cal?) Just boil them. But keep in mind you have to wash them really well and cut out the tough stems. Cut them down to just the leaves. I add a little vinegar and chopped garlic. Personally I prefer turnip greens, they aren't as bitter as collards.

Fraidy
__________________

__________________
FraidKnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:11 AM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
You have to wash them REALLY well, just to drive that home. Our son makes the best collards I have ever tasted in my life. Simmered a LONG time (and they do smell up the house). He adds some balsamic vinegar and some country ham (or bacon). He cooks the leaves fairly "whole" and then cuts them up before serving, after cooking. The pot likker is as good as the greens.
Frozen aren't bad--need more cooking.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 10:41 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
I just cook them to death with bacon, onion, chix broth and a touch of vinegar, s and p. Simmer for at least an hour -- usually more.

IMO they aren't the least bit bitter... ????
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 11:24 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
big greens require the longer cook above, but I've been finding young collards and other greens in stores regularly.

Pull the leaves off the stem (both sides) THe center stem is ineddible.

wash the leaves and blanche them in boiling salted water...couple minutes...southerners call this wilting the greens.

drain, roll and slice the greens into strips

cook simmer with onion, garlic & bacon ham hock sausage smoked turkey...whatever, broth touch of white wine or vinegar, hot sauce, test for doneness after 20 min. young ones will be ready quickly.

Mustard greens work the same way, as does kale

Turnip and beet greens and chard are tenderer...and take less cooking. chard like spinach can be pan sauteed from the start (as can young beet greens)

all of these greens are wonderful. and fiull of calcium and vitamins.
save left over cooking liquid: use in broth stocks and soups. don't ppour out the minerals and vitamins...this is pot liquor...and a good dip for your corn bread!
made mustard greens last night alongside pork tenderloin. fine food!
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 02:16 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Awesome guys, I will be using these techniques for sure this weekend.
Have to go to work, but - if possible, could you guys include any measurements or ratios. Such as how much vinegar to liquid, ham hock to liquid, etc. Should the greens be swimming in 2gal of water, or just enough to cover? I've never really cooked collard/kale before in liquid. Whenever I cook spinach I do the pan-wilting deal in some garlic-oil, so this process is a new one. Assume I'm a ten year old.

People say it smells when you cook them. Doing some reading, I see that Collards are one of the original members of the cabbage family. I love the smell of cabbage quarters cooking away in boiled dinners (some people do not! ), so I'm curious if this odor is one of the same or something I wil have to discover for myself. I belive it's a sulfur-type odor released by cabbage.

Anyhoo, this is much appreciated!
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 03:17 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
never had a smell problem.
if you blanche them, use a lot of salted boiling water...4 qts
the greens wilt down a lot. 1 "bunch" ,whatever supermarkets sell, feeds about 2 people.
once wilted and cut, I put about 2 slices of bacon cut as "lardon" 1/2 inch strips sauteed but not fully crispy
1/3 to 1/2 cup broth (or liquids) for each bunch

a "mess of greens" is several types all done together ... collards and mustard first, then add the turnip, then the chard and beet etc...

so if cooking a whole potful, you are making a broth from onion smoked pork product greens etc. and it's going to get used.

but you can cook a portion for 4 in 1 can of broth (about 2 cups)

you can also cut up turnips to go in the pot too.

see what works for you and enjoy!
remember to taste as you season with salt ans pepper. Some ham is salty some is bland etc.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2006, 06:33 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
I'm pretty random about what I do but here's a general idea:

I chop up bacon (as much as you want, I probably use 4 slices per bunch collards)) and sautee it until crisp and fat is rendered, then I sautee a med. onion diced in the drippings. I deglaze with maybe a cup of water or chix broth (in reality I use water and then add some Minor's) then add the chopped collards and cook down. When they have given up most of their own liquid to the cause, I add some more water/broth (maybe 2 cups) and about 1-2T of red wine vinegar (balsamic is too sweet for the taste I am looking for). Then I cook them covered for a long time.

If you want to serve the likker (I don't) , use more liquid.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2006, 08:06 AM   #9
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Thanks a bunch.

Stopped at the store this morning and grabbed some collards and a 3-pk of smoked ham hocks that was on sale.

Probably won't get around to it until tomorrow. Put 17hrs in at work...
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2006, 08:46 AM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
A mess of greens could be mixed I suppose but we usually just use it to denote "greens".
Only one ham hock per pot.
Not an overly amount of balsamic if that is one you are asking about. DS takes the greens out when finally done and concentrates the pot likker until it is almost syrupy. I think a bit of sugar is good in there too.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.