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Old 01-16-2014, 08:45 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
So did I. But, I heard about the petroleum and quit using white vinegar for food a long time ago, and now I much prefer other vinegars. I don't know that there is anything wrong with petroleum based white vinegar, but it creeps me out.
TL, white vinegar is made from corn. Or at least it is in the US.

EDIT: I stand corrected. A little research indicates that the acetic acid used in some vinegar can come from petroleum sources, but it must be labeled accordingly.
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:35 AM   #32
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Can you eat these plain?
They sound like they need a lot of doctoring up to make them palatable.

I agree that something you don't like needs doctoring up, but I like the taste of them. I do cook them a long time, but it's such a low heat that it's really just steaming them. I like them really, really soft and wilted down, something like canned spinach. I don't use any bacon or pork fat because I want it to be healthy, and I do not like the taste of "sweet" so I would not want any brown sugar etc in them and I also don't like the taste of vinegar. I like the taste of the greens, and they ARE flavored with the onion, garlic and mushrooms. I check and stir them occasionally and it might now be an hour that I cook them, depends on how long it takes them to soften to where I want them.

I like most veggies plain, or maybe with just a bit of butter and salt. No sauces etc.
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:43 AM   #33
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I don't think there's anything I eat that don't like the flavor of "as is" as well as seasoned or sauced. Spinach, B sprouts, even cabbage I'd have no problem eating plain if that's all there was.
I was just curious if collard greens can be enjoyed by themself. They sound like how Andy M describes cauliflower
Pac, if you eat cooked spinach you could eat cooked greens. I can eat raw spinach as in a salad, but greens are very tough and I don't think I would like them raw. Most people who cook greens add some fat pork to it. I took all the recipes I saw and used the procedure, but changed the ingredients to what I thought I would like. You can also chop them up and add them to soup.
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Old 01-17-2014, 02:10 PM   #34
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I make saag-----""Indian saag is a curry of cooked mustard or similar 'bitter' greens (kale, collards, turnip greens), and spinach or similar mild greens (chard, bok choy, beet greens). Any combination of greens works! Use more spices and peppers for hot saag, or less for mild."
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Old 01-17-2014, 09:02 PM   #35
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Hi folks. Haven't been around for a while, but it's nice to see y'all again.
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I don't think anybody would want to eat them raw...
If you get the whole plant cut off at ground level, there will be some younger, more tender leaves at the center that are great raw mixed with lettuce in a salad.

I like collards, turnip and mustard greens separate or together, cooked in a stock made from smoked pork neck bones, onion, celery and poblano pepper. It takes 3 or 4 hrs. to break down all the connective tissue that holds the spine together and then you're left with a lot of little bones and stuff that you can't pick out of the greens if you cook them together. If you make the stock the night before and drain and cool it you get a smoked pork and pepper flavored jello. Simmer the greens in that for an hour or two you've got something insanely delicious.
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Old 01-18-2014, 01:31 PM   #36
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...Once starting to boil start adding the collards a good handful at a time, pressing down and mixing up as they start to soften...
How do you prep the collards, Med, or don't you? By "handful" do you mean handfuls of whole leaves, stems and all? I didn't realize the leaves were so big...
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Old 01-18-2014, 01:53 PM   #37
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The ones I grow can have huge leaves, as in close to a foot across, because I only grow a few plants, besides the fact that It's just the 2 of us. I don't chop off the whole plant. I cut off the leaves close to the stalk at the bottom and let the plant continue to grow. One grew to almost 4' tall last year before it got too hot and I pulled it out of ground.

Anyway, I wash the leaves to get off any dirt or insects as I try to use as little as possible insecticide and/or use organic methods to cut down on pests. Cut out the biggest part of the vein then fold the leaves in half lengthwise, if it's really big make a cut lengthwise to quarter it, then cut horizontally in a couple of inch widths down length of leaf. I usually stack several leaves together and do this.

I've used the new leaves in soups and such but don't think I'd want to eat them raw.
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Old 01-18-2014, 01:59 PM   #38
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ahh... so they are more like ribbons... and you are cutting out most of the stem.
Then I can assume you can eat your recipe with just a fork and not have to use a knife?
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Old 01-18-2014, 06:00 PM   #39
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Definitely no knife needed.
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Old 01-18-2014, 06:03 PM   #40
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Thanks. Obviously I've never eaten a leafy vegetable this big.
For all I knew it was to be cut and eaten from the plate, like George Costanza and a Snickers bar.
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greens bacon onion beer, recipe

Collard greens can be really yummy Okay, I'll take the advice from yesterday's dinner thread and start a recipe thread for collards. This is not really my recipe but one I've stolen from Emeril and I just kind of adapt to what I have in the pantry. Bag of collards or a big bunch of collards - washed and picked thru (even if it's bagged cause I've found bugs before) A good sized onion, chopped 2 good size garlic cloves, chopped 4-6 pieces of bacon - I've even just used bacon grease if didn't have any bacon and it tasted the same, just didn't have the bacon bits in it Bottle of plain old beer - you can use chicken broth or even water if you don't want to use beer but beer just makes it better. 1 tablespoon of molasses or 2 tablespoons of brown sugar (dark or light, whatever you have) good shake of cayenne pepper - to your heat tolerance white vinegar to taste - I start with a couple of tablespoons salt and pepper Cook the bacon in a medium sized, heavy bottomed pot till crispy, remove and set aside to cool, then break into pieces. Cook onions in pot until translucent over medium heat, add the garlic for a minute or so, then add the whole bottle of beer. Add cayenne, S&P, molasses or brown sugar, and vinegar, stir. Once starting to boil start adding the collards a good handful at a time, pressing down and mixing up as they start to soften. Throw in some of the bacon pieces here and there as you do this. Cover and let cook until your desired doneness. Adding water if all the liquid evaporates and they still need to cook longer. I cook them until they are totally soft as that's the way Craig likes them. Usually takes the better part of an hour. We grow collards too like the other person in the dinner thread. A few plants can grow a lot of collards and where we live it's tough to give them away as most people here associate them with bad cafeteria food from school. So, we had to find other uses. BTW, they do freeze well if you blanch them but generally fall apart once they've been in the freezer. I much prefer the ones we've grown to what we get from the grocery so I don't mind freezing them. Creamed collards - just like creamed spinach but they take a little longer to cook. Collard Rolls - Blanch them, cut out the center vein where it starts to get big and roll up just like you would for cabbage rolls. We like to use dirty rice for this. Funny thing, when I posted this on the dinner forum the first year we grew collards, my idea showed up on a Food Network program a couple of months later. You can't blanch and freeze the whole leaves, they just tear apart - yep, learned from experience. Whose up next? 3 stars 1 reviews
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