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Old 01-16-2014, 12:58 PM   #1
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Collard greens can be really yummy

Okay, I'll take the advice from yesterday's dinner thread and start a recipe thread for collards. This is not really my recipe but one I've stolen from Emeril and I just kind of adapt to what I have in the pantry.

Bag of collards or a big bunch of collards - washed and picked thru (even if it's bagged cause I've found bugs before)

A good sized onion, chopped

2 good size garlic cloves, chopped

4-6 pieces of bacon - I've even just used bacon grease if didn't have any bacon and it tasted the same, just didn't have the bacon bits in it

Bottle of plain old beer - you can use chicken broth or even water if you don't want to use beer but beer just makes it better.

1 tablespoon of molasses or 2 tablespoons of brown sugar (dark or light, whatever you have)

good shake of cayenne pepper - to your heat tolerance

white vinegar to taste - I start with a couple of tablespoons

salt and pepper

Cook the bacon in a medium sized, heavy bottomed pot till crispy, remove and set aside to cool, then break into pieces.

Cook onions in pot until translucent over medium heat, add the garlic for a minute or so, then add the whole bottle of beer. Add cayenne, S&P, molasses or brown sugar, and vinegar, stir. Once starting to boil start adding the collards a good handful at a time, pressing down and mixing up as they start to soften. Throw in some of the bacon pieces here and there as you do this. Cover and let cook until your desired doneness. Adding water if all the liquid evaporates and they still need to cook longer.

I cook them until they are totally soft as that's the way Craig likes them. Usually takes the better part of an hour.

We grow collards too like the other person in the dinner thread. A few plants can grow a lot of collards and where we live it's tough to give them away as most people here associate them with bad cafeteria food from school. So, we had to find other uses. BTW, they do freeze well if you blanch them but generally fall apart once they've been in the freezer. I much prefer the ones we've grown to what we get from the grocery so I don't mind freezing them.

Creamed collards - just like creamed spinach but they take a little longer to cook.

Collard Rolls - Blanch them, cut out the center vein where it starts to get big and roll up just like you would for cabbage rolls. We like to use dirty rice for this. Funny thing, when I posted this on the dinner forum the first year we grew collards, my idea showed up on a Food Network program a couple of months later. You can't blanch and freeze the whole leaves, they just tear apart - yep, learned from experience.

Whose up next?

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Old 01-16-2014, 01:48 PM   #2
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Those sound great MT.

Here's what went on at last night's dinner thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle
I bought a bag of shredded collard greens at Trader Joe's and my experience with them is practically nill. I'm planning on cooking up some diced panchetta, (also TJ's) and onion with some of my home made chicken stock. If that doesn't sound right, please speak up fast. I guess I need to make cornbread too?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea
I'm with you so far, I also like to add fresh chopped garlic and red pepper flakes to mine.
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They turned out well last night with the addition of garlic and red pepper flakes, as prescribed by Bea.
Since we are notorious meat eaters, I nestled some large pieces of smoked sausages among the greens. A pan of cornbread made it complete. Yumm Yumm, I think I did my southern Mama proud.

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Old 01-16-2014, 02:00 PM   #3
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I love collard greens----- and they're one of the veggies that can tolerate really cool weather so it was a star in my winter garden (in California).

I like to cook it more or less the ways posted here------ but I add a lot more hot chilies or red pepper flakes.

Here are three different ways to cook collards the Ethiopian way.

Ethiopian collard greens three ways - Atlanta Ethnic foods | Examiner.com

Niter kibbe is:

Recipe: Ethiopian Spiced Clarified Butter (Niter Kibbeh) Recipes from The Kitchn | The Kitchn

I haven't made niter kibbe but I certainly will do so in the near future. Sounds great, for my tastes.
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Old 01-16-2014, 02:17 PM   #4
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I eat greens just about every day. I just chop them and clean them, then mix them with sauteed onion, garlic and mushrooms, put them in a big frying pan with a small amount of chicken broth, put the lid on and let them just steam over a very low heat for about an hour, stirring occasionally, making sure the broth doesn't cook away. I love them, and they are the most nutritious vegetable there is, I believe.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:13 PM   #5
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Can you eat these plain?
They sound like they need a lot of doctoring up to make them palatable.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Can you eat these plain?
They sound like they need a lot of doctoring up to make them palatable.
I thought that too.

The length of cooking seems a bit extreme. Collard greens are in the brassica (cabbage) family? Right? None of the cabbage family are improved by long cooking.

Incidentally, did you know that you have to be careful about your consumption of members of the brassica family if you are taking blood thinning medicine (for example Warfarin and similar drugs)
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:20 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Can you eat these plain?
They sound like they need a lot of doctoring up to make them palatable.
I don't think anybody would want to eat them raw, maybe zapped in a blender for a "health" drink but even then I'm not so sure. They are kind of tough and fibrous, especially the homegrown ones. Don't know what is grown commercially but there's a world of difference between what I grow and what I get bagged in the grocery. Greens pack a lot of nutrition plus fiber though and really aren't that much trouble. Once you get them started, it's just an occasional stir. You don't have to add all the other stuff, just makes it taste better. The lunch ladies from school certainly didn't add all the doctoring. Just greens, water, S&P and vinegar, which is why most of the kids, including myself, wouldn't touch them with a 10' pole. Honestly, I've never tried them that way as an adult. I reluctantly agreed to try Emeril's recipe since Craig likes even the "lunch ladies" greens preparation, though he much prefers Emeril's.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:25 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I thought that too.

The length of cooking seems a bit extreme. Collard greens are in the brassica (cabbage) family? Right? None of the cabbage family are improved by long cooking.

Incidentally, did you know that you have to be careful about your consumption of members of the brassica family if you are taking blood thinning medicine (for example Warfarin and similar drugs)
MC---- I'm sorry but I have to disagree with you a bit. Collards are improved by long(er) cooking, just like kale, unless you want a really chewy veggie.

Cabbage doesn't need long cooking, for my tastes. I never liked cooked cabbage because my mother always cooked it to a greenish-grey substance.
It was only after I started cooking for myself that cabbage cooked in a little butter or chicken fat for a short time was delicious!

And as a person who will be warfarin for the rest of my life I knew that about brassicas. It's really heartbreaking for me since I just love all that family and now I can only eat it in small portions or when my INR gets a little too high.
Sigh.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I thought that too.

The length of cooking seems a bit extreme. Collard greens are in the brassica (cabbage) family? Right? None of the cabbage family are improved by long cooking.

Incidentally, did you know that you have to be careful about your consumption of members of the brassica family if you are taking blood thinning medicine (for example Warfarin and similar drugs)
You have to be careful with any kind of greens when taking Warfarin, Coumadin, etc., even salad greens. Patients are warned about that when they are started on the medications.

Perhaps you should look up some other recipes before making a blanket statement about length of cooking times and/or cook some yourself. Some people cook even longer. Some people a little shorter. Depends on the texture you like. It also depends on whether you are using brand new leaves or full-size leaves. I use full-size leaves for my traditional type preparation, which is the only kind I've ever seen available commercially.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:39 PM   #10
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I would think apple cider vinegar would be better than the harsh white vinegar. Or even rice vinegar. I love collard greens and cabbage, cauliflower, etc.
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greens bacon onion beer, recipe

Collard greens can be really yummy Okay, I'll take the advice from yesterday's dinner thread and start a recipe thread for collards. This is not really my recipe but one I've stolen from Emeril and I just kind of adapt to what I have in the pantry. Bag of collards or a big bunch of collards - washed and picked thru (even if it's bagged cause I've found bugs before) A good sized onion, chopped 2 good size garlic cloves, chopped 4-6 pieces of bacon - I've even just used bacon grease if didn't have any bacon and it tasted the same, just didn't have the bacon bits in it Bottle of plain old beer - you can use chicken broth or even water if you don't want to use beer but beer just makes it better. 1 tablespoon of molasses or 2 tablespoons of brown sugar (dark or light, whatever you have) good shake of cayenne pepper - to your heat tolerance white vinegar to taste - I start with a couple of tablespoons salt and pepper Cook the bacon in a medium sized, heavy bottomed pot till crispy, remove and set aside to cool, then break into pieces. Cook onions in pot until translucent over medium heat, add the garlic for a minute or so, then add the whole bottle of beer. Add cayenne, S&P, molasses or brown sugar, and vinegar, stir. Once starting to boil start adding the collards a good handful at a time, pressing down and mixing up as they start to soften. Throw in some of the bacon pieces here and there as you do this. Cover and let cook until your desired doneness. Adding water if all the liquid evaporates and they still need to cook longer. I cook them until they are totally soft as that's the way Craig likes them. Usually takes the better part of an hour. We grow collards too like the other person in the dinner thread. A few plants can grow a lot of collards and where we live it's tough to give them away as most people here associate them with bad cafeteria food from school. So, we had to find other uses. BTW, they do freeze well if you blanch them but generally fall apart once they've been in the freezer. I much prefer the ones we've grown to what we get from the grocery so I don't mind freezing them. Creamed collards - just like creamed spinach but they take a little longer to cook. Collard Rolls - Blanch them, cut out the center vein where it starts to get big and roll up just like you would for cabbage rolls. We like to use dirty rice for this. Funny thing, when I posted this on the dinner forum the first year we grew collards, my idea showed up on a Food Network program a couple of months later. You can't blanch and freeze the whole leaves, they just tear apart - yep, learned from experience. Whose up next? 3 stars 1 reviews
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