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Old 08-04-2005, 07:24 PM   #11
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I just got a new cookbook today and was reading an aside, from the recipes, regarding the salting of eggplants. Anyhow, there was mention of it's purpose being to remove bitterness (she does say that it's the large eggplants that can more likely be bitter), but this chef says she always salts to sweat the eggplant prior to cooking because she has found that this helps to lessen the absorption of cooking oils. Thought that was a pretty good reason to do the salt thing.
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Old 08-04-2005, 10:51 PM   #12
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No self-respecting Sicilian would ever peel a melagnone.

Purging by salt is only necessary with larger eggplants, but I do it with all sizes because I am anal retentive (is "anal retentive" supposed to be hyphenated?)
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Old 08-05-2005, 01:49 AM   #13
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Generally the only time I see eggplant peeled is generally when the flesh is being reduced to a puree or mash. This is generally when the eggplants are cut in half, roasted, then the flesh scooped out, discarding the skin.

A number of people believe that salting them helps draw out some of the bitterness that is present in the liquid contained within the eggplant. However I have also heard that the current eggplant varieties have generally had the bitterness bred out of them.

In short I think you should continue doing what you have always done because you know it works for you.
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Old 08-05-2005, 02:12 AM   #14
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I always peeled them because I thought you had to (all the recipes I read said to). Now that I know that you don't have to, I will try it without peeling it.

Barbara
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Old 08-05-2005, 03:29 AM   #15
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Barbara - if I'm grilling, bbq-ing or roasting slices of aubergine, I find that the skin helps it keep its shape - it also looks nice in home-made ratatouille as another colour in the mixture!
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Old 08-06-2005, 01:29 AM   #16
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I almost always leave the 'skin' on when grilling or baking, say for baba ganouche, or Claire's famous ratatoulle then scoop out the flesh. The skin protects the flesh from too much exposure to the flame.
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Old 08-06-2005, 10:11 AM   #17
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it depends on the fruit and the recipe. a slow cook I would leave it on. "Parmesian style", leave it on. a caponata, I may skin it, especially if it is an older fruit. Again the salting depends on the age and recipe. Whenever possible I like to leave skins on for the vitamins etc.
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Old 08-06-2005, 01:59 PM   #18
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I have never even thought of peeling aubergines (I'm with you Ishbel!) they're too pretty to peel. I used to sweat them, until I read somewhere that if they don't have black seeds (are fairly young) they are not bitter and it's not necessary.
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Old 08-13-2005, 07:35 PM   #19
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I dont peel or sweat either and its not necessary when grilling or roasting.They are quite delicious cooked that way.

Also did you know they have a tiny amount of natural occurring nicotine in them?
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Old 08-15-2005, 12:20 AM   #20
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I love to say aubergine and courgette. Ok, I'm a francophile of sorts. But don't they sound prettier than eggplant and summer squash?
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