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Old 08-15-2005, 01:01 AM   #21
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Australians go the italian road, its zucchini (isntead of courgettes/summer squash) for us.
Really want to go get some eggplant, but my fridge is chock full with other vegetables which I need to devour first.
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Old 08-15-2005, 02:48 AM   #22
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Eggplant/Zucchini

The British also say "aubergine" for eggplant.

They also say "courgette" for "zucchini".

I prefer courgette because it describes a particular kind of squash. Admittedly, "zucchini squash" (taken from the Italian" is just as explicit, but people rarely put the two words together.

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Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 03:30 AM   #23
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AlexR - I use the word aubergine because I'm British! I use the word courgette - ditto.... And we never refer to it as a courgette squash - as it is a type of what we call a MARROW!

The close historical relationship between Scotland and France, known as the Auld Alliance means that we use many, many French words for our foodstuffs and cooking methods. Indeed, in Scotland, the butchery of lamb, beef etc, follows the French style rather than the English - although English cuts of meat have become more commonly seen in our supermarkets - presumably because the meat is cut at a central distribution point and delivered all over the British Isles!
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Old 08-15-2005, 05:31 AM   #24
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Squash/Marrow

Ishbel,

I saw the message in my "in box" without seeing who it was from - which is why I mentioned the British connection.

I do not believe that marrow is the equivalent of squash. It can be, but the US term of squash is all-encompassing, which I believe the British one is not. A quick Web search shows that marrow in UK English describes a squash with dark green skin and whitish flesh.

The North American family of squash is ginormous, with the most amazing variety of shapes and colors.

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Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 05:58 AM   #25
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I can assure you, as a UK national that when you leave a courgette to grow - it becomes what we call a marrow. I've done it myself, too many times, not to recognise or indeed cook with the marrows that result from that moment's indecision of 'shall I pick or leave a few days?'


By the way - you called it a zucchini squash, not I ....

And you're right - we differentiate between marrows and squashes - although both are sold readily here - everything from pattypan to butternut to jewel squashes.
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Old 08-15-2005, 06:15 AM   #26
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Cross purposes...

Hi Ishbel,

I agree with everything you say, but we seem to be talking over each other's heads!

A courgette is a type of marrow in BE and, unless I am mistaken, it is not transformed from the former into the latter simply by attaining a certain size.

I never said that you called it zucchini squash... In the separate paragraph, I was referring to the US - and as I see just above - the Australian way of referring to this vegetable.

I was unaware that you can find a large variety of marrows (squashes) in the UK. Things have certainly changed there in recent years!
In America, the brightly colored and sometimes oddly shaped squash are used for decorative purposes in the fall.

The dictionaries I looked at also used the word "gourd," but I have rarely ever heard this.

Best regards,
Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 06:16 AM   #27
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Spelling?

Or is squash one of those invariable plurals?

Alex
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Old 08-15-2005, 07:34 AM   #28
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We just call it plain old zucchini, not zucchini squash.

What I find interesting is how in Australia, for example, we call it a butternut pumpkin, as opposed to the UK/US which call it butternut squash. Never understood why, the only thing we refer to as a 'squash' is (as far as foodsubs.com goes) what you guys call a pattypan/scalloped/custard squash.
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Old 08-15-2005, 08:06 AM   #29
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Courgette/Marrow

Ishbel,

Yikes, my message got lost in cypberspace....

I think there's a little talking at cross purposes here....

My only mention of zucchini squash in a previous post referred only to the American - and as I see above, Australian - description.

As to the British words, courgette and marrow, I am in doubt as to the fact that size alone is a factor. In other words, you imply that a large courgette becomes a marrow. While this is undoubteldy true, can we not agree that a courgette is a member of the marrow family, whatever its size?

Finally, I see that the word "gourd" is used as well. I've rarely ever heard it, and for some reason I tend to associate it with sperical squash with hooked tops!

I am glad to see that you can now find a large variety of squash, marrow, whatever you want to call it, in the UK, where the food scene is much improved from when I first went there in the 70s.

Best regards,
Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 08:22 AM   #30
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But..... the 70s was a LOOONG time ago!

All those foods have been available from the earliest days.... but you just had to seek out suppliers.

I've been able to get various types of squash or pumpkin from a local greengrocer since the 60s....

Our local farmers' market is an amazing sight - almost up to French market standards - and in some cases, the produce is superior - especially our soft fruits, potatoes, carrots etc.
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