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Old 06-10-2015, 11:29 AM   #41
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It's only partially cooked and is still pretty firm. It's just a partial cook to keep the eggplant from soaking up so much oil when you fry. The slices I cut for moussaka are about 1/2 thick, though some were a little thinner or thicker for the last cuts. Out of 6 of varying sizes (poor selection at market that day to get all same size), 2 were fairly small and they did get kind of soft compared to the others to slice as easily (although they still sliced cleanly), that's why I suggested less time if they are small eggplants. The larger ones I probably could have peeled whole after baking but I didn't want to take the chance on them falling apart while frying since they go in "nude," so I just sliced off the skin after. I was using a fork to turn them and lift out of pan so even after frying they were still fairly firm.
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Old 06-10-2015, 09:20 PM   #42
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I hate soggy eggplant parm casserole!! Here is my take on Eggplant Parm.
Unpeeled, sliced, breaded, fried, single layer, topped with sauce, grated romano, parmesan and mozzarella cheeses, browned under the broiler.

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Old 06-11-2015, 06:16 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
It's only partially cooked and is still pretty firm. It's just a partial cook to keep the eggplant from soaking up so much oil when you fry. The slices I cut for moussaka are about 1/2 thick, though some were a little thinner or thicker for the last cuts. Out of 6 of varying sizes (poor selection at market that day to get all same size), 2 were fairly small and they did get kind of soft compared to the others to slice as easily (although they still sliced cleanly), that's why I suggested less time if they are small eggplants. The larger ones I probably could have peeled whole after baking but I didn't want to take the chance on them falling apart while frying since they go in "nude," so I just sliced off the skin after. I was using a fork to turn them and lift out of pan so even after frying they were still fairly firm.
Thanks!
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Old 06-12-2015, 09:09 AM   #44
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Zhizara--always pick the smallest eggplant available. The smaller the eggplant, the fewer the seeds. It is the seeds that makes eggplant bitter. I don't salt and rest small eggplant. But then, I pick them when they are the size of a large egg....
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:10 PM   #45
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Zhizara--always pick the smallest eggplant available. The smaller the eggplant, the fewer the seeds. It is the seeds that makes eggplant bitter. I don't salt and rest small eggplant. But then, I pick them when they are the size of a large egg....
And it is my understanding that the female one has the most seeds. The female has the bigger rounded bottom. Just like a woman.

And then there are the really skinny Japanese ones. I don't know how you can tell the sex on them. And they cost as a rule twice as much as the Italian ones.
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:56 PM   #46
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And it is my understanding that the female one has the most seeds. The female has the bigger rounded bottom. Just like a woman.

And then there are the really skinny Japanese ones. I don't know how you can tell the sex on them. And they cost as a rule twice as much as the Italian ones.
Sorry, this is an old wives' tale that is not true. Botanically, eggplants are fruits and have no gender. Their female flower parts are fertilized by male pollen, which then become fruits.
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Old 06-12-2015, 08:11 PM   #47
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Zhizara--always pick the smallest eggplant available. The smaller the eggplant, the fewer the seeds. It is the seeds that makes eggplant bitter. I don't salt and rest small eggplant. But then, I pick them when they are the size of a large egg....
Thanks, CWS. I always choose the smallest eggplant because I only use it for lasagna, and even a small one leaves several slices left over. I also never salt eggplant. My ankles let me know when I eat the smallest amount.

I use so many ingredients in most of my dishes that many of the canned goods are not available in low or no salt. I'm glad to see that there are more and more coming into the market, but I need more.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:37 PM   #48
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I hate soggy eggplant parm casserole!! Here is my take on Eggplant Parm.
Unpeeled, sliced, breaded, fried, single layer, topped with sauce, grated romano, parmesan and mozzarella cheeses, browned under the broiler.

That looks fabulous, MsM. I love the look of that caramelized broiled cheese.
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Old 06-13-2015, 09:03 AM   #49
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I use aubergines a lot. To do them in a lasagna type dish, slice them about 1/4inch thick, dredge them with salt, lay them out on a piece of kitchen paper, which you will have put on a cake rack. Let the juices run out for about an hour, dry them, flour them lightly, and fry quickly each side. I use olive oil. You can use them for your lasagne, for aubergines alla parmigiana. for moussaka, for spiced mince meat rolls, or for anything else that calls for aubergines done this way! They are delicious on their own as a side dish.

Hope this reply will do!

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