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Old 08-02-2009, 05:22 PM   #31
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Here's one more BIG favorite for good measure. I love to make this in the early spring when young tender kale is one of the first greens to harvest, & also in the fall & winter when frost-kissed kale is at its best. I've always used the blue curly varieties for this dish. (Obviously for vegetarian purposes you'd use water or vegetable broth for the liquid instead of chicken broth.)

BREEZY GREEK PENNE PASTA WITH KALE AND FETA

1 pound penne pasta (Barilla is my favorite brand), cooked according to package directions & drained
1 block/container of Feta cheese, chopped/crumbled
Approx. 24 Kalamata olives, pitted, & roughly chopped **
Approx. 1 pound Kale, rinsed, stems removed & discarded, & leaves roughly sliced/chopped
1 red onion, peeled & chopped
A few dollops of extra virgin olive oil for sauteeing
Dash or so of chicken broth, vegetable broth, or water
Dash of crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

While the cooked pasta is draining in a colander, heat the olive oil & saute the onion until soft but not brown in the pot the pasta was cooked in. Add the kale, stir a bit, & add a dash or 2 of chicken broth or water to prevent burning. Add chopped olives & stir until kale has wilted down. Add cooked pasta, feta cheese, & crushed red pepper & stir again until pasta is heated through. Serve hot or at room temperature.

** While jarred pitted Kalamata olives are now frequently available, pitting the olives is accomplished easily by simply placing your broad kitchen knife (sharp side away from you) over each olive & briskly hitting down on the knife with your hand. Olive will break open & pit will be easy to remove.
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Old 08-02-2009, 05:31 PM   #32
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I did a mushroom/walnut pate in cooking school. Not sure where the recipe is now, I found it online. You could do a google and find one. It was served with a roasted red pepper coulis.
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Old 08-02-2009, 06:37 PM   #33
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When I was the special diets cook at a camp a few summers ago, one day I was in a rush and had to throw together a vegetarian dish quick! I was trying to think of what they had had already and nothing left was fast. So, I looked on my cooler shelf and found some brown rice, black beans, tofu and mushrooms.

I chopped some red and white onion, minced garlic, thin sliced carrots, red and green peppers and the mushrooms, and sauted them. I added some of the cooked brown rice, black beans and cubed tofu. For seasonings I threw in some soy sauce, Italian dried herbs, vegetable broth (I did my own) and salt and pepper. I stir fried it all together and served it. They loved it and it became one of the regular items I served.

I also quite enjoyed it. I am a former vegetarian who reluctantly reverted back to red meat (only once a week, I have chicken often) because even though I ate a responsible vegetarian diet, my body needs meat protein and I went dangerously anemic.
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Old 08-02-2009, 06:42 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
I use both Patak & Trader Joe's sauces for quicky-but-good Indian fare - Tandoori, Vindaloo, Korma, etc. They work well with meat/poultry/seafood, tofu, & veggies just as well, & are easy to "tweak" to your personal taste.
Read the directions well in advance! I was all set to use one and it turned out to be a marinade of the Patak and yogurt well in advance. I scrapped that idea and went to another with the ingredients at hand.
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Old 08-02-2009, 07:26 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by bigdaddy3k View Post
Read the directions well in advance! I was all set to use one and it turned out to be a marinade of the Patak and yogurt well in advance. I scrapped that idea and went to another with the ingredients at hand.
Well yes, I'd assume folks would take the time to read the directions first. But that said, if you're adventurous, you can still use the products to make a very nice impromptu "simmer" sauce. Just add judiciously to broth &/or yogurt & your meat & veggies until it's reached the flavor/spiciness you want.
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Old 08-02-2009, 07:57 PM   #36
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I hardly know where to start.... I went vege because I don't like how meat gets to my table.

We eat as much of a varied diet as I can provide for my kids, since I am making them eat this way as well. That said, it has to be kid friendly. LOL
I like the Morningstar farms stuff, like the chik'n patties, but you have to watch out for fat and stuff like that on some of those, so I don't eat them that often. Some of their other patties lend themselves well to other recipes, like the sundried tomato and basil "pizza" burgers. I own a Vita-Mix so I always make my own tomato sauces, so a pizza sauce is usually quick and easy, and the patties are served open-face on those new thin sandwich buns, with some sauce and a sprinkle of mozz. The kids love it!
I also marinate tofu and saute it till the outsides are crispy...the Newman's own LF sesame ginger works really well.
My boy is really picky, so it's got to have visual appeal as well as some kind of commercial appeal for him to eat it.

I also just bought "Passionate Vegetarian" by Crescent Dragonwagon (yes, that's her name)and I love it! "How to cook Everything Vegetarian" by Mark Bittman has some good ideas, too.
I love vegetables so much that I can't nail down a favorite dish.....
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Old 08-02-2009, 11:05 PM   #37
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We aren't vegetarians, but we like to cook vegetarian dishes once a week or more. We have several excellent vegetarian cookbooks that I can recommend to you:

By Jeanne Lemlin (most in paperback -- all filled with excellent recipes):
Vegetarian Pleasures
Simple Vegetarian Pleasures
Quick Vegetarian Pleasures
Main-Course Vegetarian Pleasures
Vegetarian Dishes from Around the World by Rose Elliot (paperback)
The Occasional Vegetarian by Karen Lee
World Vegetarian by Madhur Jaffrey (James Beard Foundation Award winner)
Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison
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Old 08-04-2009, 06:43 PM   #38
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From what I can get around here, the Patak's are sauces and condiments, not complete meals, so I do read the sauce instructions, then wing it (not always following exactly). The Kitchens of India can be complete OR you can add favorite vegetables, serve over rice or noodles, or if you have a die-hard carnivore at the table, saute a side of meat. I find some of the Patak sauces to be a little oily, and have been known to drain oil from the top of the jar upon opening. BUT I love, absollutely love, their hot lime pickle/relish. Not for the faint of heart, though.
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Old 08-04-2009, 07:02 PM   #39
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While the oils do separate in Patak products, I consider them part of the product. They enable me to not have to use/add additional oil to the dish. All I do is use a long-handled spoon (like an iced tea spoon) to stir the oil back into the rest of the jar before I use it. Just like I do with natural nut butters.
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