"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Vegetables
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-04-2010, 04:36 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 39
Grated potatoes question (i.e. latkes or hash browns)


We've made latkes from scratch and would like to make hash browns also. My BF was complaining about having to remove the excess moisture from grated potatoes. It is a pain.

We discussed one possible alternative: using a potato ricer with a cheesecloth. Then I decided to come on here. Are there techniques to make removing the moisture easier? Any tips?

Thanks for any advice!


jamoehope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 07:34 AM   #2
Master Chef
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,034
The only way I know is to put the shredded potatoes in the middle a tea towel, gather up the corners and twist and squeeze until you wring out all the moisture.

DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 07:50 AM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
Andy M.'s Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,103
If you want to try the ricer, I think it would work. That's how I get the water out of frozen spinach after I thaw it. I don't think you need a towel if you use a ricer.
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 09:00 AM   #4
Alix's Avatar
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Don't think you'd need a cheesecloth if you used the ricer. That sounds like an excellent tip, I might try that myself. Thanks!
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 12:04 PM   #5
Master Chef
CharlieD's Avatar
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,318
Depending on how you grated the potato.

First, if you used the big hole greater then all you need is a colander, I'm assuming that is what you are talking about, since you are planning to make hash browns.
If, not then:
Second, if you used the small holes and using it for latkes you do not need to bother with removing the juice. It is a myth that the latkes will taste better, or that it would not work. All you need is an extra spoon of flour and everything will be fine.
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 03:07 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 39
Thank you for all the replies! I may try a ricer also since there seems to be a consensus on it.
jamoehope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2010, 03:28 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 39
I looked up potato ricers and found this website: Potato Ricer Reviews & Recommendations. Buy Online! . It lists uses for the potato ricer, and all of them good! Such as:
  • "Use your Potato Ricer to make ‘restaurant quality’ creamed potatos or Croquettes.
  • Make fruit purees, or coulis (ideal for freshly made baby food)
  • Juice oranges and lemons quickly by hand (cut them into quarters first)
  • Need a giant garlic press? – put the fine diskin your potato ricer and puree a large quantity of garlic in one go
  • Make crispier fried vegetables and hash browns by squeezing the water out before frying. This technique is used when making Rosties
  • Squeeze the water from cooked greens such as spinach when using as a filling in recipes like quiche, stuffed pasta, lasagne, crepes etc.
  • Press liver or eggs through your potato ricer rather than chopping them
  • Mash sweet potato, carrots, parsnip, turnips, yams, or anything else you fancy
  • Make some traditional dished such as:Lefse (a dish from Norway), Spätzle (North German noodles) and Rosties (Swiss fried potatoes),
  • Buying a new potato ricer? Give the kids your old one and let them play with Play Doh or Fimo -It makes great hair!"

jamoehope is offline   Reply With Quote


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities

Copyright 2002-2015 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:22 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.