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Old 03-27-2009, 11:27 AM   #1
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How do I make collard greens?

hello,

i'm going to make a southern dinner tonight and i'd like to throw in some collard greens. i'm not sure if my store would carry them but i never looked before. do you think every store should carry them? please tell me how i make collard greens. thanks.

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Old 03-27-2009, 11:43 AM   #2
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If it's too late for the hocks, use the last recipe, it's with bacon
LT

Collard Greens and Ham Hocks

1/2 pound smoked meat ham hocks
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 tablespoon seasoned salt
1 tablespoon hot red pepper sauce
1 large bunch collard greens
1 tablespoon butter

In a large pot, bring 3 quarts of water to a boil and add smoked meat, seasonings and hot sauce. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 1 hour.
Wash the collard greens thoroughly. Remove the stems that run down the center by holding the leaf in your left hand and stripping the leaf down with your right hand. The tender young leaves in the heart of the collards don't need to be stripped. Stack 6 to 8 leaves on top of one another, roll up, and slice into 1/2 to 1-ince thick slices. Place greens in pot with meat and add butter. Cook for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring occasionally.
When done taste and adjust seasoning.

Granny's Collard Greens with Ham Hocks
1 large bunch (about 3 pounds) of collard greens
1 smoked ham hock
1 onion, chopped
2 teaspoons of minced fresh garlic
3 teaspoons of cider vinegar
3 teaspoons of dark corn syrup
1 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon of black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of red pepper
1/2 teaspoon of white pepper
A few dashes hot pepper sauce
Cut off and discard base of stems on the greens, then coarsely chop the upper stems and
leaves. Wash several times in cold water and drain thoroughly. Place 1 packed cup of greens in
a blender or food processor and puree and set aside. Place the remaining greens and hamhock
in a large pot and cover with water. Bring greens to a rolling boil and add the onions, garlic,
vinegar, corn syrup and seasonings to taste, reduce heat to medium. Add the pureed collards.
Cover and cook for 2 hours or until cooked down and tender.


Collards with bacon
Ingredients
2 pounds of collard greens
6 slices of cooked bacon
1 medium onion, sliced or chopped
1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper
2 to 3 teaspoons Kosher salt
Procedure
Clean and wash greens well; remove tough stems and ribs. Cut them up and
place in a
deep pot; add onion and bacon to the pot. Add red pepper and
salt. Add
enough water to cover greens and cook until tender, about 1 hour. Taste and
adjust
seasonings. Serve with sliced tomato and corn bread.
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:11 PM   #3
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luckytrim covered most of the bases ... but for the flavoring "meat" - you can also use a hunk of salt pork, or if you want to use bacon it doesn't have to be cooked ... just cut the salt pork into cubes - slice the strips of bacon into about 1-inch pieces. But I agree - smoked ham hock is king!
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:31 PM   #4
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I do a little cheating with mine, but, they are still good.

Cut the thick part of the stem out then cut the leaves in wide ribbons. Wash in a big bowl of water letting the grit drop to the bottom.

Add about an inch or two of beef stock. Beef base and water is what I use. That way I can make it a bit stronger. Throw in your greens on top and drizzle with a couple/three tablespoons of olive oil. Toss to coat everything. Keep on a medium heat, covered, tossing occasionally. The greens will shrink WAY down. I like mine still on the aldente side so check them after about 30 minutes. Mine usually cook for somewhere between 30 and 45 minutes. Toss with kosher salt to taste. Taste first as the stock may flavor it enough.

For a variation I will saute some cubed pancetta and then add the stock and proceed with recipe. Then at the end toss in a handful of toasted pine nuts.
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:55 PM   #5
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If you want canned, "Glory" brand seasoned collards are pretty decent.
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Old 03-27-2009, 02:03 PM   #6
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Here in the mid Atlantic our stores have been carrying organic collards for several years now. These are fairly young and tender greens, and very inexpensive. I do not pretend to be southern but I have been shown how to do up a mess of greens in Alabama, Mississippi, and North Carolina.

Pork is the meat flavoring of choice but if you can't do that a smoked turkey wing will work ok. Bacon (preferably jowl bacon) and even pancetta works well.

Broth if you have some and are not making your own with the ham hock.

sliced or chopped Onion, and garlic too if you'd like, red pepper flakes.

Strip the leaves off the stalks all the way up. I like to blanch my greens in boiling salted water for a minute then a quick plunge into cold iced water to set the color. Then I will cut them into manageable size and cook them in the broth and meat. (Salt and pepper to taste and adjust for any preseasoned broth or salty meat product)

These young ones will be cooked in 20-30 minutes at a light simmer. Older greens which may also need a good washing can take over an hour to become tender.

Collards are full of great flavor and nutrition and go with so many meals. They can be a country staple or a high end side.

The pot liquor (left over cooking liquid) is full of nutrition and should be used in a soup or stew or eaten and a broth for corn bread!
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Old 03-27-2009, 02:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
The pot liquor (left over cooking liquid) is full of nutrition and should be used in a soup or stew or eaten and a broth for corn bread!
I gaaaroooontee Uncle Bob heard you typing this.
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Old 03-27-2009, 03:28 PM   #8
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I gaaaroooontee Uncle Bob heard you typing this.

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Old 03-27-2009, 04:40 PM   #9
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sorry, my typing was really off! should have proof read.
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Old 03-30-2009, 11:59 AM   #10
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here is what i did, thanks
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