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Old 07-05-2018, 07:22 PM   #1
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Irradiated mung bean sprouts?

I miss bean sprouts that I used to put on my avocado and cheddar cheese sandwiches. I've not bought any in quite awhile since outbreaks of E-coli were reported. I'm thinking of buying them again. I certainly won't buy mung bean sprouts that you fill a bag with using plastic tongs. However, I read that bagged bean sprouts from certified growers and that have been irradiated pose the least risk to my health. Here's a quick blurb about it.

"A study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of ionizing radiation in eliminating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on commercial ready-to-eat radish and mung bean sprouts and to assess the chemical and physical quality of these sprouts. The use of ionizing radiation was investigated as a means of reducing or totally inactivating these pathogens, if present, on the sprouts. Treatment of mung bean and radish sprouts with a dose of 1.5 and 2.0 kGy, respectively, significantly reduced E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella to nondetectable limits".

I've also read of studies that say irradiating won't help. If I do buy a bag, it will be from certified growers. I've not bought any yet. Has anyone bought a bag of bean sprouts where they state on the bag that they've been irradiated? I'm not afraid of irradiated products like some people are.

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Old 07-05-2018, 07:25 PM   #2
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What about growing your own. It's easy.
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:05 PM   #3
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What about growing your own. It's easy.
I have a mason jar and mesh lid. I've grown alfalfa sprouts. However, growing bean sprouts at home can also lead to growth of bacteria and isn't really considered any safer. Also, I don't think a bean sprout crop grows as well in a mason jar as it does in trays, which I don't really want to invest in at this time.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:25 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I have a mason jar and mesh lid. I've grown alfalfa sprouts. However, growing bean sprouts at home can also lead to growth of bacteria and isn't really considered any safer. Also, I don't think a bean sprout crop grows as well in a mason jar as it does in trays, which I don't really want to invest in at this time.
I would have thought that it could be safer because you can be extra cautious and there aren't a bunch of different people handling them or as many opportunities for contamination. If Escherichia coli is the concern, isn't that the poop bacteria? Doesn't that usually get into food from hands that weren't washed well enough or from animal feces in farm fields? I'm not an expert, so I might be wrong.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:48 AM   #5
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I would have thought that it could be safer because you can be extra cautious and there aren't a bunch of different people handling them or as many opportunities for contamination. If Escherichia coli is the concern, isn't that the poop bacteria? Doesn't that usually get into food from hands that weren't washed well enough or from animal feces in farm fields? I'm not an expert, so I might be wrong.
E. coli is not the only pathogen that can infect sprouts and the warm, moist growing conditions are perfect for promoting bacteria growth.

"Do sprouts carry a risk of illness? Like any fresh produce that is consumed raw or lightly cooked, sprouts carry a risk of foodborne illness. Unlike other fresh produce, seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to sprout and grow. These conditions are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli."

https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/type...s/sprouts.html
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Old 07-06-2018, 04:29 PM   #6
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E. coli is not the only pathogen that can infect sprouts and the warm, moist growing conditions are perfect for promoting bacteria growth.

"Do sprouts carry a risk of illness? Like any fresh produce that is consumed raw or lightly cooked, sprouts carry a risk of foodborne illness. Unlike other fresh produce, seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to sprout and grow. These conditions are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli."

https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/type...s/sprouts.html
Which was why I wrote, "If Escherichia coli is the concern ..."

Of course, in a public forum like this, it's a good idea to remind people that there can be other types of pathogens on sprouts.
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Old 07-06-2018, 04:37 PM   #7
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Which was why I wrote, "If Escherichia coli is the concern ..."

Of course, in a public forum like this, it's a good idea to remind people that there can be other types of pathogens on sprouts.
There's no reason why E. coli would be the only concern, which is why I responded. Even if the people growing sprouts at home wash their hands meticulously, there can be other problems. Since I'm immuno-compromised, as much as I love sprouts, I will not eat them, no matter who grows them.
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Old 07-07-2018, 03:17 AM   #8
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Such a shame. Fresh bean sprouts and sharp cheddar cheese and avocado on bread.
Walmart and Kroger have stopped selling bean sprouts.

I'm remembering how good a simple avocado and cheddar cheese sandwich was, with bean sprouts.

I'm gonna take a chance and buy a bag. They don't stay fresh for long. so what?
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Old 07-07-2018, 01:44 PM   #9
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Heh, I just bought a bag of bean sprouts. At the bottom of the bag is says to heat or stir fry the sprouts before serving. Non GMO.

If sprouts beans are irradiated, does that mean they are genitally modified? GMO?

I'm going to make maybe two or three sandwiches with these sprouts and take my chances, then toss them before they start to get slimy. So far, no major recall notice. Then again, by that time...

I have a craving for a simple avocado, with sharp cheddar cheese and bean sprouts sandwich. 30 years ago I never heard of outbreaks of sicknesses with sprouts. Probably because there wasn't that much data back then being publicized.
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Old 07-07-2018, 02:16 PM   #10
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Heh, I just bought a bag of bean sprouts. At the bottom of the bag is says to heat or stir fry the sprouts before serving. Non GMO.

If sprouts beans are irradiated, does that mean they are genitally modified? GMO?
No. The non-GMO thing is a marketing gimmick.
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