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Old 01-22-2008, 08:08 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
For 2 cups of liquid, I usually use 3 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons flour. Melt butter, stir in flour and cook, constantly stirring, until the butter and flour are incorporated. Add liquid gradually, stirring constantly, until all liquid is added. Now, continue stirring with a whisk until the mixture comes to a boil. That's when you will have the full thickness of your mixture.
Even better, Katie. (You know me well, huh. I'm one who needs the exact measurements or it scares the heck out of me!) Thanks so much for this.
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:16 PM   #12
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For Chicken fried Steak/Chicken etc. Look for this product. Pioneer Brand. Simple to make and you can "Jazz" it up to make you happy!!

Enjoy!
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:28 PM   #13
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For Chicken fried Steak/Chicken etc. Look for this product. Pioneer Brand. Simple to make and you can "Jazz" it up to make you happy!!

Enjoy!
For real, Uncle Bob? Can I use this and it wouldn't be a total travesty??? Because if you say it's OK, I'm going for it. A true southern gentleman like yourself would never lead a lady astray when it comes to gravy, right?
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:39 PM   #14
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For real, Uncle Bob? Can I use this and it wouldn't be a total travesty??? Because if you say it's OK, I'm going for it. A true southern gentleman like yourself would never lead a lady astray when it comes to gravy, right?
I promise you as an Officer & Gentleman you can do this. Three simple steps, and it's good! They also make a Sausage Gravy Mix. Add some fried sausage patties, break them into small pieces, add to the Gravy mix. Serve over hot biscuits. Shake a few drops of Tabasco on and you'll having them shouting with joy!!!


Only stipulation is...Ya got invite me over!!!
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:46 PM   #15
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This is awesome. I actually make wonderful biscuits (from scratch, even) and I think being able to serve real biscuits and gravy would be great! The Tabasco tip is much appreciated, too. My family adores hot sauces but I would never think to put some in gravy. WooHoo! And you have a standing invitation anytime you wander down this way.
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:53 PM   #16
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Make your fabulous home made biscuits...break them open...cover with Sausage gravy. Serve the Tabasco/Louisiana hot sauce at the table so everyone can add as much as they like....or none at all. Hot coffee is a must!! Eggs & Grits..optional!!

Have Fun!!!
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Old 01-22-2008, 09:04 PM   #17
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Oh yes, always steaming hot coffee to go with or after every meal. I may be an "uncertain" cook, but I serve up a mighty good cup of coffee.
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Old 01-22-2008, 09:30 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
For 2 cups of liquid, I usually use 3 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons flour. Melt butter, stir in flour and cook, constantly stirring, until the butter and flour are incorporated. Add liquid gradually, stirring constantly, until all liquid is added. Now, continue stirring with a whisk until the mixture comes to a boil. That's when you will have the full thickness of your mixture.

Thanks for this guideline. I never know how much roux to make up for how much liquid I want to thicken. I never pay attention when following a recipe. This will help.
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Old 01-22-2008, 10:59 PM   #19
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UncleBob; Do you add your roux straight into the liquid? I've never done it quite that way as I would be afraid of creating a lumpy gravy. I have always added liquid to the roux, in small amounts, stirring in each addition of liquid until the roux has become a medium-thick paste. I then add that to the cream, milk, stock, or whatever. This assures me that I will have a silky-smooth gravy or sauce.

Also, when making soups where the solids tend to settle to the bottom, as in split pea soup, or bean soup, make a blonde roux, and add some of the soup broth until a medium paste is formed. Then, add the paste to the remaining soup. This is called "binding" the soup and keeps the solids suspended evenly from top to bottom of the pot. It can even be used in chili (but I wouldn't use it in my chili).

Also use the roux as a starter for many gumbos, gravies, Veloute, Bechemel sauce, and small or derivative sauces such as Alfredo Sauce, or Mornay sauce, and for making choux paste for eclairs and puff pastries.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-23-2008, 07:56 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
UncleBob; Do you add your roux straight into the liquid?
Sometimes yes...Sometimes no...If I am making (chicken) gravy in a skillet then I add liquid to the roux. I control the thickness of the gravy by the volume of liquid that is added to the set amount of roux. In the case of the OP question, where I have a set amount of liquid, I control the thickness by either adding the roux straight to the (small amounts) of liquid to control thickness, or sometimes the "binding" method you mentioned for larger amounts of liquid. At other times, a flour "slurry" added to the pot liquid in small amounts works well to achieve desired thickness. By whichever method... I find a a wire whisk used briskly invaluable.
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